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Trigonometry in Aviation

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matthew smith

on 4 April 2014

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Transcript of Trigonometry in Aviation

About Aviation
Aviation has existed for over 2000 years, from the first kites in China to jets flying at supersonic speeds.

The Wright brothers were the first to ever design and build a plane that flew with a powered engine, not just gliding with the wind

The years between WWI and WWII are what saw great advancements in aircraft technology and design, going from biplanes made of wood and fabric to monoplanes made of aluminum.

The last quarter of the 20th century saw a change in emphasis, instead of
progress in flight speeds, distance, and materials technology, they
looked towards the digital revolution both in flight avionics and in
aircraft design/manufacturing techniques.

Right Triangle (sine, cosine, tangent)
If the pilot planned the approach to begin 5nm from the end of the runway you can find the altitude the aircraft is when intercepting the final approach.

1nm = 6,076.1 feet
5nm = 6076.1 x 5 = 30,380.5 feet
30,380.5 x 3 tan = 1,592 feet


Trigonometry in Aviation
By Alicia Kilgore & Matthew Smith
If a glider is going a steady speed, it will lose altitude as it travels. The red line in the picture shows the glider decreasing at an angle and by using sine and tangent, they take the other two sides and put them in the equations to figure out that angle.
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