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Analysis of "In Flanders Fields" by John McCrae

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by

Forrest Walker

on 4 March 2014

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Transcript of Analysis of "In Flanders Fields" by John McCrae

Sentence Structure in Theme
The author uses enjambment to emphasize the theme:
"To you from failing hands we throw The torch"(11-12).
The author writes the poem in a rondeau to emphasize that they were dying in a foreign land but that the others should keep on fighting:
"In Flanders fields"(9,15)
The author uses juxtapostion to show the silent good in war:
"The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below"(4-5).
Sentence Structure In Theme: The Because
In the first quote of the previous slide, the author uses enjambment to emphasize the theme by continuing the thought of carrying on the torch-or the battle-even after he and others have died.
In the second quote of the previous slide, the author writes the poem in a perfect rondeau to emphasis the placement of the war. Flanders was a medieval country where much of World War 1's western front was fought. It shows the theme by saying that even though they are fighting and dying on foreign land, the fight is still worth fighting.
In the third quote of the previous slide, the author shows us that there is a silent good in war through juxtaposition. While the guns are going off below, the larks still sing a song of happiness.
Works Cited:
Theme:
The theme of "In Flanders fields" by John McCrae is that even though your friends might die, you must fight on and make sure that their fight for their country is not in vein.
In Flanders fields
by John McCrae
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing ands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
Analysis of "In Flanders Fields" by John McCrae
The Because:
The author tells the readers that even though the loss of lives is great, we must make sacrifices if we are to protect our country:
"Between the crosses, row on row"(2).
We are the Dead... Take up our quarrel with the foe"(6,10).
Figurative Language in Theme: The Because
In the first quote of the previous frame, the author insinuated that the poppies were the good between the bad like the life after the fire by painting a picture with imagery.
In the second quote of the previous frame, the author uses flashback to show how war can take lives very quickly. Your friends might be there one day, and they don't exist the next.
In the third quote of the previous frame, the author uses foreshadowing to imply consequences of not continuing the fight of the war's predecessors.
Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com, n.d.
Web. 02 Mar. 2014.
Thesaurus.com. Thesaurus.com,
n.d. Web. 02 Mar. 2014.
"The Free Automatic Bibliography
and Citation Generator." EasyBib. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Feb. 2014.
"The Soldier by Rupert Brooke."
Prezi.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Mar. 2014.
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place
And in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie,
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing ands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
Figurative Language in Theme
The author uses imagery to emphasize the theme:
"...the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row"(1-2).
The author uses flashback to show the beauty in war:
"We are the Dead. Short days ago we lived, felt dawn, saw sunsets glow, loved and were loved"(6-8).
The author uses foreshadowing to show consequences:
If ye break faith with us who die we shall not sleep"(13-14).
In Conclusion: WAR IS WORTH THE COST!!!
"In Flanders fields" by John McCrae induces that war is worth the cost for everyone alike. If you are dead and you are still telling those around you to keep on fighting, then it is implyed that you would willingly die for the same cause several times again. This is evident when John McCrae says, "Take up our quarrel with the foe"(10). If you are telling your nearest and dearest friends to go get themselves killed in a war, then you are saying that war is worth fighting. He then ends the poem with one very strong note, "If ye break faith with us who die / We shall not sleep, though poppies grow / In Flanders fields"(13-15). This shows that it would be un-honorible to stop fighting and that war truely is worth fighting when the cause is just.
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