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Big Picture Africa Honors

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by

Alex Stewart

on 3 November 2014

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Transcript of Big Picture Africa Honors

Big Picture Africa Honors
Aksum
Great Zimbabwe
Why it should be preserved
It should be preserved because of its history of successful trade and cultures. If we start to preserve our history now, we may benefit from it in the future. Their history may have secrets that we need for our future.
Tombs of Buganda Kings
19th century

The Kasubi Tombs in Kampala, Uganda, is the site of the burial grounds for four kabakas, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. On 16 March 2010, some of the major buildings there were almost completely destroyed by a fire, the cause of which is under investigation. The Buganda Kingdom has vowed to rebuild the tombs of their kings and President Museveni said the national government of Uganda would assist in the restoration of the site.
(Axum)
1st-13th centuries BCE
The Kingdom of Aksum or Axum, also known as the Aksumite Empire, was a trading nation in the area of Eritrea and northern Ethiopia, which existed from approximately 100–940 AD. It grew from the proto-Aksumite Iron Age period c. 4th century BC to achieve prominence by the 1st century AD, and was a major player in the commerce between the Roman Empire and Ancient India. The Aksumite rulers facilitated trade by minting their own currency, the state established its hegemony over the declining Kingdom of Kush and regularly entered the politics of the kingdoms on the Arabian peninsula, eventually extending its rule over the region with the conquest of the Himyarite Kingdom.
Detailed Map
Great Zimbabwe is a ruined city in the southeastern hills of Zimbabwe near Lake Mutirikwe and the town of Masvingo. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe during the country's Late Iron Age. Construction on the monument by ancestors of the Shona people began in the 11th century and continued until the 14th century,[1][2] spanning an area of 722 hectares (1,780 acres) which, at its peak, could have housed up to 18,000 people. It is recognised as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.
1100–1450 CE
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