Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Overview of Grade 6 Social Studies Curriculum

Ontario Curriculum SS Gr.6
by

Cindyl Arnold

on 8 May 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Overview of Grade 6 Social Studies Curriculum

Concepts 1. Systems and structures
2. Interactions and interdependence
3. Environment
4. Change and continuity
5. Culture
6. Power and governance Goals • Understand the basic concepts of social studies, history, and geography
• Develop the skills, strategies, and habits of mind required for effective inquiry and communication, and for the application of the basic concepts of social studies, history, and geography
to a variety of learning tasks
• Relate and apply the knowledge acquired through social studies and the study of history and
geography to the world outside the classroom Grade 6
Social Studies
Curriculum Teachers Roles
Teachers are responsible for developing appropriate instructional strategies and methods for assessing and evaluating student learning. Using a variety of instructional, assessment, and evaluation strategies, teachers provide numerous opportunities for students to develop skills of inquiry and communication and acquire map, globe, and graphic representation skills while discovering and learning fundamental concepts.
The activities offered should enable students to relate and apply these concepts to the societal, environmental, and economic conditions and concerns of the world in which they live. Opportunities to relate knowledge and skills to these wider contexts will motivate students to learn in a meaningful way and to become lifelong learners. Specific Expectations 1. Knowledge and Understanding
2. Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills
3. Application
*4. Map, Globe, and Graphic Skills Gr 6 S.S Curriculum at a Glance Systems & Structures: The ways humans and nature are organized. Humans have created systems and structures to allow societies to function; natural systems and structures have developed in response to a variety of natural factors. Interactions & Interdependence: The influences shaping relationships within and among human and natural systems and structures. Human and natural processes and components connect with, adapt to, and have an impact on one another. Environment: The natural and built elements of which the earth is composed, and the complex web they form. Change and Continuity: The fundamental criteria for assessing the development of human and natural systems and structures. Change is manifested by differences over time, and is recognized by comparing phenomena and contexts as they exist at different times. Continuity represents consistency and connectedness over time, and is recognized by exploring the forces within nature and human societies that create stability and link the past with the present. Culture: Expressions of humanity learned and shared within a specified population, influenced by the physical environment. Culture provides a conceptual framework for interpreting the world, and influences the perception of time, place, identity, significance, and change. Power and Governance: The means and supporting structures whereby laws and rules are enforced in a society and in the global community. Expectations: 1. Heritage and Citizenship - Grade 6: First Nation Peoples and European Explorers

2. Canada and World Connections - Grade 6: Canada’s Links to the World Made up of specific knowledge and skills that students are expected to acquire, demonstrate, and apply in their class work and investigations, on tests, and in various other activities on which their achievement is assessed and evaluated. Achievement Chart The achievement chart identifies four categories of knowledge and skills in social studies (knowledge and understanding, thinking, communication and application). It enables teachers to make judgements about student work that are based on clear performance standards and on a body of evidence collected over time.
The Achievement chart uses Criteria, Descriptors and Qualifiers to help teachers develop & organize judgements on the four categories of knowledge and skills. The 4 categories under knowledge and skills are:
1. Knowledge & Understanding
2. Thinking
3. Communication
4. Application Criteria Qualifiers
Level 1- "Limited"
Level 2 - "Some"
Level 3 -"Considerable"
Level 4 - "Thorough" Criteria: Within each category in the achievement chart, criteria are provided, which are subsets of the knowledge and skills that define each category. The criteria identify the aspects of student performance that are assessed and/or evaluated, and serve as guides to what to look for. Descriptors: They indicates the characteristic of the student’s performance, with respect to a particular criterion, on which assessment or evaluation is focused.Help teachers to focus their assessment and evaluation on specific knowledge and skills for each category and criterion, and help students to better understand exactly what is being assessed and evaluated. Qualifier: A specific “qualifier” is used to define each of the four levels of achievement –that is,limited for level 1,some for level 2,considerable for level 3, and a high degree or thorough for level 4. A qualifier is used along with a descriptor to produce a description of performance at a particular level. Descriptor By the end of Grade 6, students will:

1. Describe characteristics of pre-contact First Nation cultures across Canada, including their
close relationships with the natural environment; the motivations and attitudes of the
European explorers; and the effects of contact on both the receiving and the incoming
groups.

2. Use a variety of resources and tools to investigate different historical points of view about the
positive and negative effects of early contact between First Nation peoples and European
explorers.

3. Analyse examples of interaction between First Nation peoples and European explorers to
identify and report on the effects of cooperation and the reasons for disagreements between
the two groups. Canada's Links to the World Overall Expectations First Nation Peoples and European Explorer By the end of Grade 6, students will:
1. Identify and describe Canada’s economic, political, social, and physical links with the United States and other regions of the world.
2. Use a variety of resources and tools to gather, process, and communicate information about the domestic and international effects of Canada’s links with the United States and other areas of the world.
3. Explain the relevance to Canada of current global issues and influences. Specific Expectations 1. Knowledge and Understanding:
2. Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills
3. Application
*4. Map, Globe, and Graphic Skills 1. Knowledge and Understanding: 1. Identify some countries with which Canada has links (e.g., in Europe, the Pacific Rim, the Americas,Asia, the Middle East,Africa).

2. Describe some of the connections Canada shares with the rest of the world (e.g., trade, history, geography, tourism, economic assistance, immigration, indigenous peoples,peacekeeping, media, culture).

3. Identify products that Canada imports and exports.

4. Identify the countries to which Canada exports goods.

5. Identify the countries from which Canada imports goods.

6. Identify some important international organizations/agreements in which Canada participates and describe their purpose.

7. Identify Canada’s connections with the United States through the media, trade, immigration, culture, technology, tourism, history, and geography .

8. Describe distinguishing characteristics of a country in another region with which Canada has links (e.g., climate, physical features, political system, economic activities, international influence, celebrations). 2. Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills: 3. Applications *4. Map, Globe, and Graphic Skills: 1. Formulate questions to develop research plans with a statement of purpose.

2. Analyse, classify, and interpret information about the United States and at least one other country from another region of the world.

3. Use and construct a variety of graphic organizers and graphs to sort, classify, connect, and interpret information.

4. Observing bibliographic conventions, use media works, oral presentations, written descriptions, illustrations, tables, charts, maps, and graphs to communicate main ideas, with supporting evidence, about the various regions of the United States and about one other country from another region of the world.

5. Use appropriate vocabulary (e.g.,technology, culture, immigration, tourism, physical features, indigenous peoples, export, import, parallels, meridians, Pacific Rim, economics, media) to describe their inquiries and observations. 1. Use base maps and a variety of information sources to sketch the relative position of places.

2. Create maps using shading/colour to show details of the physical characteristics of regions.

3. Use information about time zones to identify time differences among regions of the world.

4. Use special-purpose maps (e.g., contour maps, climatic maps, physical-features maps) to find specific geographic information.

5. use latitude and longitude coordinates to locate some major cities and countries of the world.

6. Compare various map projections of the world (e.g., Mercator, Peters, Mollweide, Atlantic-centred and Pacific-centred), and analyse their differences to determine the particular bias of each. 1. Use an appropriate presentation format to show how the contributions of an outstanding Canadian are recognized in the global community as well as in Canada (e.g., in dance, music, art, technology, etc).

2. Describe some ways in which Canada has influenced other countries.

3. Describe some influences of other countries on contemporary Canadian society and the lifestyles of Canadians.

4. Describe Canada’s participation in international efforts to address current global issues (e.g., peacekeeping, environmental initiatives, world health initiatives, disaster relief, regulation of child labour, human rights violations, acceptance of refugees). 1. Knowledge and Understanding: 1. Examine various theories about the origins of First Nation and Inuit peoples in North America.

2. Describe the attitude to the environment of various First Nation groups.

3. Compare key social and cultural characteristics of Algonquian and Iroquoian groups.

4. Identify the Viking, French, and English explorers who first came to and explored Canada, and explain the reasons for their journeys.

5. Identify technological developments and cultural factors that assisted and promoted the exploration of North America.

6. Describe the expansion of European influence through the founding of the first trading posts and explain how the fur trade served the interests of both the Europeans and the First Nation peoples.

7. Identify the results of contact for both the Europeans and the First Nation peoples (e.g: sharing of beliefs, knowledge, and skills; intermarriage; trading alliances and conflicts; impact of European diseases on First Nation peoples; impact of fur trade on natural resources such as beaver populations). 2. Inquiry/Research and Communication Skills: 1. Formulate questions with a statement of purpose to develop research plans.

2. Select relevant resources and identify their point of view.

3. Identify and explain differing opinions about the positive and negative effects of early contact between European and First Nation peoples .

4. Use and construct a variety of graphic organizers to clarify and interpret information.

5. Read, interpret, and compare historical and modern maps of an area to determine accuracy.

6. Build models or draw and label various forms of maps, using cartographic symbols and a legend.

7. observing bibliographic conventions, use media works, oral presentations, written notes and reports, drawings, tables, charts, and graphs to communicate the results of inquiries about the effects of early contact between First Nation peoples and early European explorers. 3. Applications 1. Explain how cooperation between First Nation groups and early European explorers benefited both groups.

2. Explain how differences between First Nation peoples and early European explorers led to conflicts between the two groups.

3. Express their personal viewpoints, based on historical evidence, about the outcomes of early contact between First Nation peoples and early European explorers.

4. Identify some present-day issues concerning First Nation peoples that relate to results of early contact.

5. Identify achievements and contributions of Aboriginal people in present-day Canada. KNOWLEDGE & UNDERSTANDING: Subject-specific content acquired in each grade (knowledge), and the comprehension of its meaning and significance (understanding).
THINKING: The use of critical and creative thinking skills and/or processes, as follows:
– planning skills (e.g., focusing research, gathering information, organizing an inquiry)
– processing skills (e.g., analysing, evaluating, synthesizing)
– critical/creative thinking processes (e.g., inquiry, problem solving, decision making, research)
COMMUNICATION: The conveying of meaning through various forms, as follows:
– oral (e.g., story, role play, song, debate)
– written (e.g., report, letter, diary)
– visual (e.g., model, map, chart, movement, video, computer graphics)
APPLICATION:. The use of knowledge and skills to make connections within and between various contexts 4 Categories of Knowledge and Skills Overall Expectations Specific Expectations First Nation Peoples
& European Explorer Specific Expectations for
Canada's Links to the World
Full transcript