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1.7 Tone in "Cathedral"

Tone & Core Model
by

Jason Eiben

on 19 September 2013

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Transcript of 1.7 Tone in "Cathedral"

Practice:





1) What words seem to convey a tone?
2) What connotations do these words have?
3) What attitude do these connotations suggest for the author or character?
Practice:





1) What words seem to convey a tone?
2) What connotations do these words have?
3) What attitude do these connotations suggest for the author or character?
Independent & Silent Reading:

Read and analyze at least two of the passages.

1) What words seem to be examples of diction?
2) What connotations do these words have?
3) What connections or relationships do these connotations help you to notice?
Silently read and
annotate the story.

After you have finished reading and annotating, you will discuss the reading with a partner.
I. Aim & HW


II. Course Breakdown


III. Partner Grading


IV. "Why You Want..."


V. Diagnostic Feedback


VI. Homework Intro

Do Now:
Pick up all documents from the front. Find a seat where you can be productive.

Read the "Reading =/= reading" and "Subtext > Text" sections of the course guide. On your own paper, write a 1 sentence summary of the main idea of each section in your own words.
AIM: SWBAT identify the course-wide goals, procedures, and expectations for English III.
HW: Read and annotate the introduction of How to Read Literature Like a Professor.

Honors: Also read Chapter 1 of Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction
HW: Read the introduction to
How to Read Literature Like a Professor

Annotate following the guide in your resources.


Honors: Also read the introduction to
Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction
Thesis
Claim 1
Claim 2
Claim 3
Transition
(in Justification)

Transition
(in Justification)

Conclusion
- restate conflict of text
- restate thesis
- explain how claims 1-3 prove thesis
- "so what?" or advice to readers
Speaking of grading...

Working with a partner, read the student information for your assigned sample essay (Selection 1 or Selection 2). Read the essay together, then give it a grade 1 - 100.

Be prepared to explain why you think the essay deserves the grade that you gave it!
Share out - what scores did we give to...

Selection 1 - "Overprotected"


Selection 2 - "Social Dangers"


Why did we give different scores to these essays?
SAT Critical Reading Scores:
2012 National Average: 496
White: 528
Black: 428
Hispanic: 451

1 = 280
2 = 310
3 = 330
4 = 360
5 = 380
6 = 400
7 = 410
8 = 420
9 = 440
10 = 460
11 = 470
12 = 480
13 = 500
14 = 510
15 = 520
16 = 540
17 = 550
18 = 570
19 = 580
20 = 590
21 = 610
22 = 620
23 = 640
24 = 650
25 = 670
26 = 690
27 = 720
28 = 740
29 = 790
30 = 800
Diagnostic Scores
Income Ranges
0-20k: 441
20-40k: 466
40-60k: 487
60-80k: 501
80-100k: 515
100-120k: 527
120-140k: 531
140-160k: 540
160-200k: 545
200k+: 576
China: 300 million English “learners”

India: 125 million proficient speakers (10% of population)

USA: 316 million total population

Average Undergraduate Reading Load: 250-300 pgs/week

14-week semesters (two weeks midterms and finals) x 250-300 =

3500 – 4300 pgs/semester x2 =
7000 – 8600 pgs/year
If you lose these documents, you can find them on the shared folder in Google Drive!
I. Aim & HW


II. HW Reflection


III. Annotation


IV. The Story of the Three Bears


V. The Core Model


VI. Exit Ticket

Do Now:
Take out your reading homework.

On your notes for today, explain at least two key ideas that the reading contained. For each idea, identify a quote or line number that you feel contains this key idea.

If you did not read, START READING IMMEDIATELY! Sad face.
AIM: SWBAT identify the components of the “Core Model” in order to analyze the differences between shallow and deep interpretation of a text.
HW: Read and annotate Chapter 1 of How to Read Literature Like a Professor.

**Bring your copy of the summer reading stories to class on Monday!**
HW: Read chapter 1 of
How to Read Literature Like a Professor
**Bring summer reading stories to class on Monday!**
If you lose any documents, you can find them on the shared folder in Google Drive!
Lesson 1.2
Lesson 1.3
Independently complete a "Core Model" organizer for the following quote:
“…whether she broke her neck in the fall; or ran into the wood and was lost there; or found her way out of the wood, and was taken up by the constable and sent to the House of Correction for a vagrant as she was, I cannot tell.”
Key Idea
Quote
HtRLLaP Introduction
Key Idea
Quote
Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction
Key Concepts:
What is this story about?

(Hint: not the plot! What is the author trying to express?
1) Texts have a deeper meaning than the plot

2) College-level thinking asks for the deeper meaning

3) You can practice skills (memory, symbol, pattern) to get better at finding deeper meaning
Key Concepts:
1) "Theory" is...


2) Theory is used to...


3) Examples:
Foucault -

Derrida -
“She could not have been a good, honest old Woman; for first she looked in at the window, and then she peeped in at the keyhole; and seeing nobody in the house, she lifted the latch.”
“The door was not fastened, because the Bears were good Bears, who did nobody any harm, and never suspected that anybody would harm them.”
I. Aim & Work


Agenda


II. HW Reflection


III. Weekly Schedule


IV. Vocabulary List 1A


V. Unit Goals


VI. Feedback & Goals



VII. Exit Ticket

Do Now:
Take out your reading homework.

On your notes for today, explain at least two key ideas that the reading contained. For each idea, identify a quote or line number that you feel contains this key idea.

If you did not read, START READING IMMEDIATELY! Sad face.
AIM: SWBAT define unit vocabulary and identify the key skills that will be tested on the Unit 1 Test.
Work: Re-read "The Fat Girl" through the perspective of HtRLLaP Chapter 1.

Honors: Begin reading "Rip Van Winkle" (finish by Friday)
Work: Read chapter 2 of How to Read Literature Like a Professor

Honors: Start reading "Rip Van Winkle"
If you lose any documents, you can find them on the shared folder in Google Drive!
Lesson 1.4
Key Idea
Quote
HtRLLaP Introduction
Key Idea
Quote
Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction
Key Concept:
Key Concepts:
1) "Theory" is...


2) Theory is used to...


3) Examples:
Foucault -

Derrida -
I. Do Now [5]
II. Weekly Schedule [ ]
III. Reading HW Reflection [5]
IV. Vocabulary List 1A [15]
V. Unit Goals [5]
VI. Feedback & Goal Setting [20]

Mondays – Vocabulary, Feedback & Goal Setting

Tuesdays – Mini-Lesson, Seminar

Wednesdays – Peer Review, Reading

Thursdays – Mini-Lesson, Seminar

Fridays – Quiz, Writing Workshop

intercede

hackneyed

approbation

innuendo

coalition
Vocab List 1A:
elicit

hiatus

assuage

decadence

expostulate
Each week we will focus on 8-10 vocabulary words. On the last day of the week, you will take a short quiz on this vocabulary, and on the basic concepts covered in the week's reading assignments.

Vocabulary quizzes will be multiple choice, and will require you to write a short rationale of why you believe each word is the correct answer.
http://www.vocabtest.com/high_school/junior.php
(verb) To act or interpose on behalf of someone in difficulty or trouble, as by pleading or petition.
(adjective) Lacking in freshness or originality; Made commonplace, trite, or stale.
(noun) Praise or approval; The act of approving.
(noun) An expression with an indirect, subtle, or implied meaning.
(noun) A pact or treaty among individuals or groups, during which they will cooperate or join forces, each in their own self-interest.
(verb) To draw out of bring out; To evoke.
(noun) A break or interruption in space, time, or continuity.
(verb) To lessen the intensity of something; To make milder or less severe;
(noun) Having the quality of being decadent (over-indulgent, luxurious, excessively rich, lacking morality).
(verb) To discuss or examine a subject; To reason earnestly with a person in order to convince them of something.
Unit 1 – Boot Camp: Paragraphs
(3 weeks; September 11 – September 26)

Core Text(s): “Cathedral”; “The Fat Girl”; “Emergency”; "WAYGWHYB"
Wrap-Around Text(s): How to Read Literature Like a Professor

Major Assessments: 1 Quiz (vocabulary, 1 analytical paragraph); 1 Test (Write 3 analytical, evidence-based paragraphs about selected passage)

Honors: “Rip Van Winkle”, full in-class essay on test
Skills
Summer Reading
Strengths
Weaknesses
1) Complete the Unit 1 Personal Goals sheet

2) Start learning/reviewing this week's vocab

3) Begin tonight's reading work
THIS TIME IS DESIGNED FOR YOU TO START REACHING YOUR GOALS. THIS IS NOT AN INVITATION FOR CONVERSATIONS.
15 minutes IP
15 minutes IP
15 minutes IP
15 minutes IP
30 minutes IP
- Generally followed CCEAJ paragraph structure

- Good focus on the prompt (author's attitude)
- Claims were too general ("The author has an attitude...") or too obvious ("Society prefers skinny people")

- Implied analysis instead of explicated analysis
I. Aim & Work


Agenda


II. HW Reflection


III. Lecture: Diction


IV. Silent Re-Read


V. Seminar


VI. Work / Exit Ticket

Do Now:
Read both sides of the sample
student work from yesterday's lesson.

On this sheet, identify two things that you think each student did well. In addition, write at least two sentences comparing the work that you did to the work that you see on the page.
AIM: SWBAT identify instances of intentional diction and analyze the impact of this diction on the meaning of a passage.
Work: Read Chapter 2 of HtRLLaP ("Nice to Eat With You: Acts of Communion")

Honors: Continue reading "Rip Van Winkle"
(finish by Friday)
Lesson 1.5
Key Idea
Quote
HtRLLaP Introduction
Key Idea
Quote
Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction
Key Concept:
Key Concepts:
1) "Theory" is...


2) Theory is used to...


3) Examples:
Foucault -

Derrida -
I. Do Now [5]
II. Lecture: Diction [10]
III. Silent Re-Read [5]
IV. Seminar [15]
V. Work / Exit Ticket [15]
1) On your own sheet of paper, create a Core Model chart and complete an analysis of the quote below:
THIS TIME IS DESIGNED FOR YOU TO PRACTICE SKILLS.
THIS IS NOT AN INVITATION FOR CONVERSATIONS.
When an author makes use of intentional diction, they often choose words that have an intentional connotation.
Examples:
- Youthful vs. Juvenile (young)

- Laid-back vs. Careless (relaxed)

- Social vs. Chatty (talkative)

- “peeped” in “The Story of the Three Bears”

“Once when she was sixteen a boy kissed her at a barbecue; he was drunk and he jammed his tongue into her mouth and ran his hands up and down her hips.”
Subtext > Text
Diction: (noun)
The choice and use of words and phrases in speech or writing.
Connotation: (noun)
An idea or feeling that a word elicits in addition to its literal or primary meaning.
Key Idea: There are no such things as true synonyms! All words have connotations that make them different from other words.
"kissed"
"boy"
"jammed"
1) A college seminar is a discussion in which students try to contribute an analysis of the text.

2) One student should be speaking at a time, and other should be taking notes to track the conversation.

3) Unless there is a clear error or a complete lack of ideas being shared, your teacher will not participate in the conversation.

4) Opinions are not valid forms of participation in a seminar discussion. Arguments (theories with supporting evidence) will earn credit.

5) Remember that there is no correct way to analyze a text, so we are not debating. We are presenting evidence to identify possible interpretations of the text.
Seminar Expectations:
In what ways is "The Fat Girl" an example of a "quest"?

***Try to include analysis of diction in your arguments!***
Focus on the subtext - what "quest" has Louise gone on, and what is the effect of this quest on our understanding of the story?

STUDENTS WHO ARE NOT SPEAKING SHOULD BE TAKING NOTES ON THE DISCUSSION!
“She knows he will leave soon. It has been in his eyes all summer. She stands, using one hand to pull herself out of the chair. She carries the boy to his crib, feels him against her large breasts, feels that his sleeping body touches her soul.”
Claim: Dubus' diction suggests that Louise may have been the victim of sexual assault in the past, and that this trauma could be the source of her poor self-image.
(pg 159) "...they were fat because they chose to be. And she was certain of something else too: she could see it in their faces: they did not eat secretly. Which she did: her creeping to the kitchen when she was nine became, in high school, a ritual of deceit and pleasure."
(pg 164) "That was her ritual and her diet for the rest of the year, Carrie alternating fish and chicken breasts with the steaks for dinner, and every day was nearly as bad as the first. In the
evenings she was irritable. In all her life she had never been afflicted by ill temper and she looked upon it now as a demon which, along with hunger, was taking possession of her soul."
(pg 166) "She looked down at the earth far below, and it seemed to her that her soul, like her body aboard the plane, was in some rootless flight. She neither knew its destination nor where it had departed from; it was on some passage she could not even define."
Denotation: (noun)

The literal or primary meaning of a word or phrase.
Independent & Silent Reading:
Today you will have 30 minutes to work.
Work. Not talk. WORK.

- Finish reading Chapter 2 of HtRLLaP

-Re-read and annotate "Cathedral" by Raymond Carver

- Review vocab for Friday's quiz!
Do Now:
Read both sides of the sample
student work from yesterday's lesson.

On this sheet, identify two things that you think each student did well. In addition, write at least two sentences comparing the work that you did to the work that you see on the page.
AIM: SWBAT reflect on successful and unsuccessful interpretations of diction, and practice annotation strategies through independent reading.
Work: Re-read "Cathedral" by Raymond Carver, keeping in mind Chapter 2 of HtRLLaP.

Honors: Continue reading "Rip Van Winkle"
(finish by Friday)
Lesson 1.6
Key Idea
Quote
HtRLLaP Introduction
Key Idea
Quote
Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction
Key Concept:
Key Concepts:
1) "Theory" is...


2) Theory is used to...


3) Examples:
Foucault -

Derrida -
I. Do Now [5]
II. Exit Ticket Reflection [5]
III. Reading Expectations [5]
IV. Independent Reading [30]
1) On your own sheet of paper, create a Core Model chart and complete an analysis of the diction in the quote below:
THIS TIME IS DESIGNED FOR YOU TO PRACTICE SKILLS.
THIS IS NOT AN INVITATION FOR CONVERSATIONS.
1) A college seminar is a discussion in which students try to contribute an analysis of the text.

2) One student should be speaking at a time, and other should be taking notes to track the conversation.

3) Unless there is a clear error or a complete lack of ideas being shared, your teacher will not participate in the conversation.

4) Opinions are not valid forms of participation in a seminar discussion. Arguments (theories with supporting evidence) will earn credit.

5) Remember that there is no correct way to analyze a text, so we are not debating. We are presenting evidence to identify possible interpretations of the text.
Seminar Expectations:
In what ways is "The Fat Girl" an example of a "quest"?

***Try to include analysis of diction in your arguments!***
Focus on the subtext - what "quest" has Louise gone on, and what is the effect of this quest on our understanding of the story?

STUDENTS WHO ARE NOT SPEAKING SHOULD BE TAKING NOTES ON THE DISCUSSION!
“She knows he will leave soon. It has been in his eyes all summer. She stands, using one hand to pull herself out of the chair. She carries the boy to his crib, feels him against her large breasts, feels that his sleeping body touches her soul.”
+
- Most responses included all components of the Core Model

- Clear understanding of the text in this assigned quote
- Lacking analysis of DICTION, or connection between diction and claim

- No explanation for how or why the connotations show deeper meaning
I. Aim & Work


Agenda


II. HW Reflection


III. Exit Tickets


IV. Expectations


V. Seminar


VI. Work / Exit Ticket

Creative Project Guidelines
Practice:





1) What words seem to convey a tone?
2) What connotations do these words have?
3) What attitude do these connotations suggest for the author or character?
Do Now:
On your notes for today, write a brief (2-sentence) explanation for the main ideas in Chapter 2 of HtRLLaP.

Additionally, write a 2-sentence summary of the plot of "Cathedral" by Raymond Carver.
AIM: SWBAT identify the relationship between diction and tone, through an analysis of "Cathedral" by Raymond Carver.
Work: Review this week's vocabulary and notes for tomorrow's quiz.

Honors: Continue reading "Rip Van Winkle"
(finish by Friday)
Lesson 1.7
Key Idea
Quote
HtRLLaP Ch. 2
Key Idea
Quote
Literary Theory: A Very Short Introduction
Key Concept:
Key Concepts:
1) "Theory" is...


2) Theory is used to...


3) Examples:
Foucault -

Derrida -
I. Do Now [5]
II. Lecture: Tone [10]
III. Reading [5]
IV. Partners / Seminar [15]
V. Work / Exit Ticket [15]
1) On your own sheet of paper, create a Core Model chart and complete an analysis of tones in the quote below:
THIS TIME IS DESIGNED FOR YOU TO PRACTICE SKILLS.
THIS IS NOT AN INVITATION FOR CONVERSATIONS.
“He didn’t have any money, either. But she was in love with the guy, and he was in love with her, etc. She’d seen something in the paper: HELP WANTED – Reading to Blind Man, and a telephone number. She phoned and went over, was hired on the spot. She read stuff to him, case studies, reports, that sort of thing. She helped him organize his little office in the county social-service department.”
Subtext > Text
Tone: (noun)
Key Idea: Tones are usually created through diction, so you need to consider the connotations of important words/phrases!

Missing a tone can cause you to drastically misread the text.
Tone: 1) What attitude does the narrator have toward the relationship between his wife and the blind man, and how can we tell?
1) A college seminar is a discussion in which students try to contribute an analysis of the text.

2) One student should be speaking at a time, and other should be taking notes to track the conversation.

3) Unless there is a clear error or a complete lack of ideas being shared, your teacher will not participate in the conversation.

4) Opinions are not valid forms of participation in a seminar discussion. Arguments (theories with supporting evidence) will earn credit.

5) Remember that there is no correct way to analyze a text, so we are not debating. We are presenting evidence to identify possible interpretations of the text.
Seminar Expectations:
In what ways is "The Fat Girl" an example of a "quest"?

***Try to include analysis of diction in your arguments!***
Focus on the subtext - what "quest" has Louise gone on, and what is the effect of this quest on our understanding of the story?

STUDENTS WHO ARE NOT SPEAKING SHOULD BE TAKING NOTES ON THE DISCUSSION!
(pg 123-124) [the drawing scene] "So we kept on with it. His fingers rode my fingers as my hand went over the paper. It was like nothing else in my life up to now.
Then he said, 'I think that's it, I think you got it,' he said. 'Take a look. What do you think?'
But I had my eyes closed. I thought I'd keep them that way for a little while longer. I thought it was something I ought to do.
'Well?' he said. 'Are you looking?'
My eyes were still closed. I was in my house. I knew that. But I didn't feel like I was inside anything.
'It's really something,' I said.
Claim: Carver's diction helps to reveal the narrator's condescending tone toward the relationship between Robert (the blind man) and the narrator's wife.
The apparent attitude of an author or speaker toward a subject or audience.
Authors and characters can express tones (which can be different)
“Atticus was feeble: he was nearly 50.”
– Scout in To Kill a Mockingbird
“Look at you," he said. "Lasagna, for God's sake. When are you going to start? It's not simply that you haven't- lost any weight. You're gaining. I can see it. I can feel it when you get in bed. Pretty soon you'll weigh more than I do and I'll be sleeping on a trampoline."
–Richard in “The Fat Girl”
“All morons hate it when you call them a moron.”
– Holden Caulfield in The Catcher in the Rye
Character's attitude toward another character
Character's attitude toward a general topic or idea
Author's attitude toward a topic, shown through the character's attitude toward a topic
Tone is created through…
- Performance (the way that a line is said)
- Diction

2) How does the author seem to feel about this character's attitude?
"etc." connotations:
- being bored
- not important
- repeating yourself
"little" office connotations:
- not successful
- embarrassing
- childish
The narrator seems to have a condescending tone toward their relationship.
"she read stuff to him"
connotations:
- ignorance
- lack of interest
The author seems to characterize the narrator negatively, so he does not agree with the narrator's attitude toward the blind man.
(pg 113) “He also had this full beard. But he didn’t use a cane and he didn’t wear dark glasses. I’d always thought dark glasses were a must for the blind. Fact was, I wished he had a pair. At first glance, his eyes looked like anyone else’s eyes. But if you looked close, there was something different about them.”
(pg 115) “We dug in. We ate everything there was to eat on the table. We ate like there was no tomorrow. We didn’t talk. We ate. We scarfed. We grazed the table. We were into serious eating. The blind man had right away located his foods, he knew just where everything was on his plate. I watched with admiration as he used his knife and fork on the meat.”
(pg 121) [Robert is talking] “I’m just curious and there’s no offense. You’re my host. But let me ask if you are in any way religious? You don’t mind my asking?”
I shook my head. He couldn’t see that, though. A wink is the same as a nod to a blind man. “I guess I don’t believe in it. In anything. Sometimes it’s hard. You know what I’m saying?”
I. Aim & Work


Agenda


II. HW Reflection


III. Lecture: Tone


IV. Silent Reading


V. Seminar


VI. Work / Exit Ticket
Full transcript