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Pronouns Level 2

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by

Ami-lyn Ward

on 30 September 2014

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Transcript of Pronouns Level 2

Pronouns
The Magic Lens Vol. 2
Pronouns are used instead of repeating an antecedent.
ANTECEDENT= the noun to which the pronoun refers
Pronouns = refer to nouns
Hamlet went to New York where Hamlet went to the opera.
By avoiding monotonous repetition of lengthy or compound nouns, pronouns make language fast.
Do not have antecedents:
ANYONE who is registered may vote.
SOMEONE left her paper on the desk.
Indefinite Pronouns
A subject is a subject,
and an object is an object.
Pronoun Rule:
I
you
he
she
it
we
you
they
Subject Pronouns
me
you
him
her
it
us
you
them
Object Pronouns
Shows possession:
mine
yours
his
hers
its
their
Possessive Pronouns
Used to interrogate:
who
whose
whom
which
what
Interrogative pronouns
Used to demonstrate
this
that
these
those
Demonstrative Pronouns
That cat shredded the leather couch.
Relates an adjective clause to a main clause
who
whose
whom
which
that
Same words as the interrogative pronouns!
Relative pronouns
The man
who followed you
turned left.
Who or Whom?
Who is a SUBJECT
Whom is an OBJECT
The composer who wrote the concerto.
You asked whom?
Reflects back on a noun or pronoun used previously in the sentence:
"I am almost mad
myself
."
Reflexive Pronouns
Intensive Pronouns
Used to intensify the emphasis on a noun or pronoun (same words as reflexive pronouns):
I
myself
agree with that idea.
Indefinite pronouns ending in --one or --body are SINGULAR:
Someone lost her pen.
It is incorrect to say: Someone lost THEIR pen.
(Still not sure? Use the article escape:
Someone lost A pen.)
Pronoun Agreement
_____ went to the store.
I laughed at _____.
They look similar to possessive pronouns but have a different function.

Possessive adjective:
His
coat is warmest.
Possessive pronoun:
His
is the warmest.
Why are there two "you" words listed?
One is singular, and one is plural.
Use this sentence to help you remember the subject pronouns.
Use this sentence to help you remember the object pronouns.
A possessive adjective is followed by a NOUN
Beware of Possessive Adjectives!
Beware of
demonstrative adjectives
(used to modify a noun):
adjective modifying cat
That is exactly what happened.
pronoun
Because there is not a specific person/thing the pronouns are replacing
Remember the Unified Pronoun Rule?
Two singular antecedents joined by OR require a singular pronoun
Using AND to join any antecedents automatically requires a PLURAL pronoun
If Hemingway and Fitzgerald are here, let
them
in.
If Hemingway or Fitzgerald is here, let
him
in.
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