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NATURE

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by

Lauren Valla

on 3 October 2013

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Transcript of NATURE

NATURE
Nature in Huck Finn
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn takes place mainly in and around the nature surrounding the Mississippi River. This novel wouldn't be the same without the particular setting of the Mississippi River Region in the mid 1800s. Nature is a large part of who the main characters are and also who they grow to be throughout the book.
The Mississippi River
By: Lauren Valla
Frances Wood
Amanda Wade
Jackson McDonough
Peter Welch
Katrina Uy
Regina Valencia
Huck and Jim are extremely comfortable in nature.
Nature supplies protection and supplies for Huck and Jim.
Mark Twain uses Nature in many literary devices throughout the novel.
Huck is knowledgeable about the nature that surrounds him.
''My souls, how the wind did scream along! (pg130)''
''He was well born, as the saying is, and that's worth as much in a man as it is in a horse. (pg 107)''
THEN
NOW
VS
''He used to always whale on me when he was sober and could get his hands on me; though I used to take to the woods most of the time when he was around. (pg 13)''
''I was powerful lazy and comfortable. (pg. 39)''

History of Mississippi River:
• Became property of the US in 1803
• 2,340 miles long / 7 miles wide
• Flows through ten states
• From Native American tribes through European explorers, the American Civil War, Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, and its modern commercial uses

Mississippi River then:
• First steamboat plied river in 1811
• Invasion route for Union Armies
• Agriculture has been dominant in the Mississippi basin for 200 years
• Supports wide array of fish and wildlife
• Carried goods/people in early years
• Pivotal role as a route for trade/travel

Mark Twain & the Mississippi River:
• Mississippi River means "father of waters"
• Mark Twain means "Mark Number Two"
• Twain becomes a "cub" steamboat pilot at age 21
• Hometown in Hannibal, Missouri
• Visited several times / wrote "Life on the Mississippi"
• Shaped American Literature with famous stories about the river lifestyle

Mississippi River Today
ships 500 million tons
provides water for consumption and agriculture
suffers pollution
home to hundreds of species of animal life
"When the first streak of day began to show we tied up to a towhead in a big bend on the Illinois side, and hacked off cottonwood branches with the hatchet, and covered up the raft with them so she looked like there had been a cave-in in the bank there...We had mountains on the Missouri shore and heavy timber on the Illinois side, and the channel was down the Missouri shore at that place, so we warn't afraid of anybody running across us (pg. 63)."
"I landed... and hid my bundle in the woods, and then filled up the canoe with water, and loaded rocks into her and sunk her where I could find her again when I wanted her (pg. 214)."
"We was down south in the warm weather now, and a mighty long ways from home. We begun to come to trees with Spanish moss on them, hanging down from limbs like long, gray beards (pgs. 208-209)."
"I lit out and shook the reefs out of my hind legs, and spun down the river road like a deer (pg. 210)."
Nature in the World
Nature is everything
All around you
Oxford :The phenomena of the physical world collectively, including plants, animals, the landscape, and other features and products of the earth, as opposed to humans or human creations
Nature is important to all of life and is heavily used for resources
In the novel Huck Finn, nature is a huge part of the story
Mississippi River is key
Huck heavily relies on nature for food and resources (fishing, firewood, food)
New developments occur because of old mistakes
Deforestation, pollution, smog, invasive species
life very different than Huck Finn
What we missed
- Mr. Smith Carlile is pessimistic about our future
- Veganism, bike-riding, and electric cars are helpful, but not helpful enough
- Mr. Smith Carlile really likes platypuses
What was said
- Population is the world's biggest enemy
- Fertile lands will be flooded, and soon
Interview with Mr. Smith Carlile
Deforestation
Water Pollution
Asian Carp in the Mississippi
Dead Zone in Gulf of Mexico
Naturalism
The belief that only natural laws and forces operate the world; the idea or belief that nothing exists beyond the natural world
Part of irreligon series
began in 12th century
National Park System
Began in Yellowstone
450 Natural, Historical, Recreational and Cultural areas
Began in 1864
Parks, monuments, springs, memorials
Global Issues
Work being done all over globe
many organizations restoring habitats like The Nature Conservancy
Going into oceans and maintaining coral reefs
planting trees after deforestation
"Every man is in his own person the whole human race, with not a detail lacking. I am the whole human race without a detail lacking; I have studied the human race with diligence and strong interest all these years in my own person; in myself I find in big or little proportion every quality and every defect that is findable in the mass of the race. I knew I should not find in any philosophy a single thought which had not passed through my own head, nor a single thought which had not passed through the heads of millions and millions of men before I was born… The human race is a race of cowards; and I am not only marching in that procession but carrying a banner."
- Mark Twain, Mark Twain in Eruption
Human Nature to Mark Twain:
"Every man is in his own person the whole human race, with not a detail lacking. I am the whole human race without a detail lacking; I have studied the human race with diligence and strong interest all these years in my own person; in myself I find in big or little proportion every quality and every defect that is findable in the mass of the race. I knew I should not find in any philosophy a single thought which had not passed through my own head, nor a single thought which had not passed through the heads of millions and millions of men before I was born… The human race is a race of cowards; and I am not only marching in that procession but carrying a banner."

- Mark Twain, Mark Twain in Eruption
"Doesn't make any difference who we are or what we are, there's always somebody to look down on."
- Mark Twain, 3,000 Years Among the Microbes

Human Nature:
• Twain studied human nature with the same devoted attention as environmental nature
• He was an avid student of science and human behavior
• Twain characterizes his writing by the uncanny ability to see the world through eyes of the "other"
• Ex: Corn Pone Opinions
• Refers to members of his own species, "the damned human race"
Human Nature in HuckFinn:
• Huck witnesses Jim's distress while thinking of his family, and concludes, "I do believe he cared just as much for his people as white folks does for their'n." (166)
• Huck is an example of Twain's transforming power to adopt another's perspective
• Huck has the aspect of a "deformed conscience" - mind that is influenced by the only ideas and concepts its been exposed to
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