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LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

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on 28 January 2014

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Transcript of LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY
TIPS FOR LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY
SOME EXAMPLE OF LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY
MARTOGRAFI - HUNTING SARANGAN - 2014
Ir. AHENDRA
1. Maximize your Depth of Field
The simplest way to do this is to choose a small Aperture setting (a large number) as the smaller your aperture the greater the depth of field in your shots
2. Use a Tripod
As a result of the longer shutter speed that you may need to select to compensate for a small aperture you will need to find a way of ensuring your camera is completely still during the exposure
3. Look for a Focal Point
Focal points can take many forms in landscapes and could range from a building or structure,
a striking tree, a boulder or rock formation, a silhouette etc.
Think not only about what the focal point is but where you place it.
The rule of thirds might be useful here.
4. Think Foregrounds
One element that can set apart your landscape shots is to think carefully about the foreground of your shots and by placing points of interest in them. When you do this you give those viewing the shot a way into the image as well as creating a sense of depth in your shot.
5. Consider the Sky
Most landscapes will either have a dominant foreground or sky – unless you have one or the other your shot can end up being fairly boring.
If you have a bland, boring sky – don’t let it dominate your shot and place the horizon in the upper third of your shot (however you’ll want to make sure your foreground is interesting). However if the sky is filled with drama and interesting cloud formations and colors – let it shine by placing the horizon lower.
6. Lines
Lines give an image depth, scale and can be a point of interest in
and of themselves by creating patterns in your shot.
7. Capture Movement
wind in trees, waves on a beach, water flowing over a waterfall, birds flying over head, moving clouds
8. Work with the Weather
Many beginner photographers see a sunny day and think that it’s the best time to go out with their camera – however an overcast day that is threatening to rain might present you with a much better opportunity to create an image with real mood and ominous overtones.
Look for storms, wind, mist, dramatic clouds, sun shining through dark skies, rainbows, sunsets and sunrises etc and work with these variations in the weather rather than just waiting for the next sunny blue sky day.
9. Work the Golden Hours
shooting times are around dawn and dusk – because that’s when the light is best and he find that landscapes come alive.
These ‘golden’ hours are great for landscapes for a number of reasons – none the least of which is the ‘golden’ light that it often presents us with. The other reason that I love these times is the angle of the light and how it can impact a scene – creating interesting patterns, dimensions and textures.
10. Think about Horizons
It’s an old tip but a good one – before you take a landscape shot
always consider the horizon on two fronts.
11. Change your Point of View
Take a little more time with your shots – particularly in finding a more interesting point of view to shoot from. This might start with finding a different spot to shoot from than the scenic look out (wander down paths, look for new angles etc), could mean getting down onto the ground to shot from down low or finding a higher up vantage point to shoot from.
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