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Features and Benefits

Most people are great at rattling off a list of features but struggle at describing how that feature actually benefits the customer.
by

Gwendolyn Hensley

on 26 April 2011

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Transcript of Features and Benefits

FEATURES AND BENEFITS Do you know the difference between
a feature and a benefit for your product? Feature – A factual statement about the product or service being promoted. Actual characteristics of the product or service.
Example the features of a pencil: Slender stick, comprised of graphite enclosed in wood or metal. Benefit – What the feature of the product or service
means to the customer. A benefit answers the questions:
"What's in it for me?"
"What does that mean to me?"
Now lets look at the benefits of a pencil... Since pencils are long and slender (feature) you can plug a hole with them.
In a bind (benefit) you can uses a pencil to fill a countersunk screw hole when a dowel isn't handy. A pencil has a graphite tip (feature). Graphite, a main ingredient in pencil lead, is an excellent dry lubricant (benefit). Rub graphite shavings onto a key's jag­ged edge so it will slip easily into a fussy lock. Most people are great at rattling off a list
of features but struggle at describing how
that feature actually benefits the customer. We assume that customers will understand why they should buy
our product or service just because they've been told about it.
Many times we only communicate the features
of our product or service to customers and neglect
to mention the benefits.
But features aren't what entice customers to buy.
A customer's perception of each feature's results is
what attracts him or her to a particular product or service. When you try to sell the features of
your product or service, you're making
the customer do all the work to figure
out why they want the feature.
It's in your best interest to
draw the connection for them.
But to do that, you have to know
the benefits yourself.
Create a list of as many features as you can think of for your product or service. Match that list of features to a
benefit that makes your product
or service worth buying. Practice this list until it become second nature.
You however, being the stellar sales person you are will go one step further and give the WIIFM (What’s In It For Me). This is the statement that matches up your feature with their need thus establishing benefit.
You however, being the stellar sales person you are will go one step further
and give the WIIFM (What’s In It For Me). This is the statement that matches
up your feature with their need thus establishing benefit.
The easiest way to start a benefit statement is to begin with:
"What this means to you, is…"

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