Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Types of Weather

10 different types of weather and how they form.
by

Anna Bourne

on 10 November 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Types of Weather

Thunderstorms
Thunderstorms are produced by cumulonimbus clouds. There needs to be moisture, warm unstable air and lift (fronts, sea breezes) in order for a thunderstorm to occur.
Hail
Hail form when thunderstorm updrafts are strong enough to water droplets well above the freezing level. This freezing process forms a hailstone, which falls from the sky as precipitation.
Blizzards
Cold air below freezing is needed to make snow. Then moisture and warm, rising air is needed to form clouds and precipitation. When enough snow falls rapidly and violently, it forms a blizzard.
Water Spouts
A waterspout is a column of rotating, cloud-filled wind. A waterspout descends from a cumulus cloud to an ocean or a lake. The water inside a waterspout is formed by condensation in the cloud.
Freezing Rain
Freezing Rain happens when precipitation falls in liquid form as raindrops and immediately freezes as it hits most any surface. This can happen when the temperature is very low.
Dust Storms
The erosion of soil in one area and deposition of it in another is what causes dust storms. When dry, warm winds blow across the soil, it is carried away and collects in a dust storm.
Hurricanes
Hurricanes form over warm water and are fueled by evaporation from sea water. The atmosphere must cool off very quickly in order for one to form. Winds flow outward above the storm allowing the air below to rise.
Snow
Snow is formed when temperatures are low and there is moisture - in the form of tiny ice crystals - in the atmosphere. When these tiny ice crystals collide they stick together in clouds to become snowflakes. If enough ice crystals stick together, they'll become heavy enough to fall to the ground.
Types of Weather
Tornadoes
Most tornadoes form from thunderstorms. You need warm, moist air from the Gulf of Mexico and cool, dry air from Canada. A change in wind direction and an increase in wind speed with increasing height creates an invisible, horizontal spinning effect in the lower atmosphere.
Fog
Fog forms when cool air passes over a warm body of water or moist land. In general we see that fog is formed whenever there is a temperature difference between the ground and the air. When the humidity is high enough and there is enough moisture, we see fog.
Bibliography/URLs
http://www.weatherwizkids.com/
https://eo.ucar.edu/kids/dangerwx/blizzard3.htm
http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/encyclopedia/waterspout/?ar_a=1
http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/snow/how-is-snow-formed
http://weather.about.com/od/winterweather/f/FreezingRain.htm
http://www.universetoday.com/85349/how-does-fog-form/

Tornado
http://lostandtwentysomething.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/tornado.png
Thunderstorm
http://media.harnesslink.mycms.co.nz/files/w400h320/66773/Thunderstorm.png
Freezing Rain
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-fUkuCH3Tctc/UPvMwXYUttI/AAAAAAAAQe8/_Bg4MhgWYfg/s1600/011813+-+Result+of+Freezing+Rain+Before+The+Fast+&+Furious+Snow+-+Norton+Area+-+Roddy+Addington+PNG.png
Water Spout
http://images.sodahead.com/polls/003334229/Waterspout-at-Batemans-Bay-93296800535_xlarge.png
Fog
http://www.dougblackie.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/fog.jpg
Images

Dust Storm
http://www.vizrt.com/news/30629/sandstorm.png/alternates/w940up/sandstorm.png
Hurricane
http://weblogs.sun-sentinel.com/news/weather/hurricane/blog/hurricanewater-thumb.png
Snow
http://www.oliec.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Snowscape.png
Full transcript