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"Death, be not proud" - John Donne

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Samie Chiriso

on 1 June 2016

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Transcript of "Death, be not proud" - John Donne


Literary Canon
"Death, be
not proud"
John Donne
Metaphysical Poetry
" The intellectual abstract analysis that focuses on things beyond our physical surroundings "
Metaphysical Poetry Uses
- Conceits
- Subtle argument
-Complex concept rather than language
- Paradox

Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow
Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee do go,
Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.
Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well
And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?
One short sleep past, we wake eternally
And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.
Death, be not proud
John Donne
Structure
Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
A
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;
B
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow
B

Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
A
From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
A
Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,
B
And soonest our best men with thee do go,
B
Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.
A
Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
C
And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
D
And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well
D
And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?
C
One short sleep past, we wake
eternally

E
And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt
die.

E
"From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,"
"To be or not to be"
"...To die: to sleep..."
"Thou art slave..."
"We are the slave to death"
"Thou art salve to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men.
And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell.
And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well,"
"...poppy or charms..."
"
Death,
be not proud, though some have called thee Might and mighty and dreadful..."



"Die not, poor
Death
, nor yet canst thou kill me."



"And death shall be no more;
Death,
thou shalt die."
"...soul's delivery.'
"One short sleep past, we wake eternally
And death shall be no more; Death thou shalt die"
Style
- Conversational



- Argumentative
Conversational Element:

"
Death
, be not proud, though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful... "
"... we wake eternally ...[while]... Death, tho shalt die."
Argumentative Element:
"...Why swell'st thou then?"
Simple language...
Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow
Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee do go,
Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.
Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well
And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?
One short sleep past, we wake eternally
And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.
...Complex Concepts:
"..Death, thou shalt die."
Plague

John Donne
Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;
For those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow
Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
Much pleasure; then from thee much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee do go,
Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery.
Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
And poppy or charms can make us sleep as well
And better than thy stroke; why swell'st thou then?
One short sleep past, we wake eternally
And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.
"Death, be not proud"
John Donne
Bibliography
Encyclopedia Britannica. (2016). Metaphysical poet | English literature. [online] Available at: http://www.britannica.com/art/Metaphysical-poets [Accessed 16 May 2016].

G.Pinka, P. (2014). John Donne | English poet. [online] Encyclopedia Britannica. Available at: http://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Donne [Accessed 22 May 2016].

Infoplease.com. (2016). metaphysical poets. [online] Available at: http://www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/entertainment/metaphysical-poets.html [Accessed 16 May 2016].

Kiephaan, (2013). Metaphysical Poetry 2. [online] YouTube. Available at: [Accessed 22 May 2016].

Luminarium.org. (2016). Jokinen. A Quick and Rough Explication of Donne's Holy Sonnet 10: Death Be Not Proud.. [online] Available at: http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/deathbenotexpl.htm [Accessed 22 May 2016].

Philosophybasics.com. (2016). Metaphysics - By Branch / Doctrine - The Basics of Philosophy. [online] Available at: http://www.philosophybasics.com/branch_metaphysics.html [Accessed 17 May 2016].

Poetryfoundation.org. (2016). Holy Sonnets: Death, be not proud. [online] Available at: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/44107 [Accessed 16 May 2016].

Poets.org. (2016). Hamlet, Act III, Scene I [To be, or not to be] | Academy of American Poets. [online] Available at: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/hamlet-act-iii-scene-i-be-or-not-be [Accessed 21 May 2016].

Shmoop.com. (2016). Death, be not proud (Holy Sonnet 10): Section I (lines 1-6) Summary. [online] Available at: http://www.shmoop.com/death-be-not-proud-holy-sonnet-10/section-1-lines-1-6-summary.html [Accessed 12 May 2016].

Sparknotes.com. (2016). SparkNotes: Donne’s Poetry: Divine Meditation 10. [online] Available at: http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/donne/section6.rhtml [Accessed 16 May 2016].

vangoghfan, (2012). How might one explain, line-by-line, the meanings of the first eight lines of John Donne's sonnet beginning "Death be not proud"? | eNotes. [online] eNotes. Available at: http://www.enotes.com/homework-help/please-explain-these-lines-from-poem-death-not-330560 [Accessed 22 May 2016].
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