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STEMbots

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Troy Durk

on 6 November 2016

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Transcript of STEMbots

STEMbots
Angela, Nairy, Troy

Chapter 4 CGI
Multiplication & Division
Planning the Details

ASSESSMENT
Chapter 7 CGI
Children's Strategies for Solving Multidigit Problems
Chapter 6 CGI
Base-Ten Number Concepts
Managing Student Teams
1. Provide them with tools such as forms, templates, rubrics and other self-assessment guidelines.
2. coach students by modeling behaviors for them, talking with them as they work, and giving feedback.
Presentations
1. Make sure students are fully prepared to present (maybe provide planning form)
2. During presentations, make sure audience is quiet and shows respect to others
3. When presentations are done, take time to reflect and have students reflect
individual journal entry
think-pair-share
small group discussion
fishbowl discussion
4. Celebrate the projects/presentations
5. Gather feedback for future improvement
6. Save student work as examples for following years
Teaching Student Centered Mathematics
Collaborating with Families, Community, and Principals
Formative Assessment
Guide Students in Self-Assessment
At the end of projects, provide students with an opprtunity to assess their work's quality
Daily Teaching and Learning Tasks
Forming Teams
Tools for Planning and Managing a Project
Direct Modeling
Chapter 8 CGI
Problem Solving as Modeling
Incorporating Literacy and Technology
Model the use of literacy, explicitly teach strategies, SCAFFOLD, use literature circles
Creating a Culture of Inquiry
Ask self questions to determine if you're providing opportunities for inquiry:
Allowing for student generated research?
Letting students know the project is open-ended? There are no right or wrong ways to research
Coaching in using many method of investigation and sources of info? Encourage creativity and critical thinking
Letting students wonder, research, and share? Broaden thinking by listening to others, especially peers
Homework Practices and Parent Coaching
Students need Parents' Participation
Homework Support: Mimic lesson model, distribute content, ask-before-tell, provide good questing prompts.
Resources for Families: Figurethis.com, NCTM, MathForum.com, NLVM
GO BEYOND HOMEWORK: SEE MATH AT HOME
Involve ALL families: Honor different strategies, communicate, gather, family homework, translate, use social media
Launching the Project
Grouping - using groups of counters, tally marks, or other representations and counting the total number of objects.
Measurement Division - Construct a giving number of sets, each containing the specified number of objects.
Partitive Division - Construct groups of objects. Finding the number of objects in the groups rather than finding the number of groups.
Counting Strategies
Children typically do not use this strategy for multiplication and division because it is more difficult.
Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (2015). Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. pp. 56-60
Number Facts
Students use facts they know from memory to derive other facts.
Central principle is for students to understand you count collections of 10 just like you count individual units.
Both Multiplication and Measurement Division problems provide context for introducing base-ten concepts.
Collections more than 100 objects - allows more sophisticated reasoning.
Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (2015). Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. pp. 84-95

Invented Algorithms - students collectively or individually invent algorithms for addition and subtraction.
When children use their own invented algorithms they usually avoid some if the more serious misconceptions that someone else shows them.
Children's invented algorithms can build on their Direct Modeling with tens strategies and their knowledge of multidigit addition.
Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (2015). Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. pp. 49-75

Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (2015). Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. pg. 61
Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (2015). Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. pp. 96-128
Children naturally attempt to model the action or relationship in problems.
The primary goal of CGI - to help children build upon and extend the intuitive modeling skills.
Children have difficulty with problems when they cannot figure out how to model it.
Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (2015). Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. pp. 128-133
Have students use their Project Work Plans to note their progress on completing project tasks
Coach students during projects in order to help them improve upon their critical thinking skills
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pgs. 93-103
Steps to Guide Students in Self-Assessment
1. Review the criteria for evaluating a product or presentation (on a rubric)
2. Use an example to show them how to apply the criteria to the product or presentation
3. Ask them to write on the rubric their reasoning and judgement for the end result
4. Provide students with feedback on their self-assessment
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pgs. 104-108
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pgs. 109-125
All sorts of necessary forms available for teacher use:
Project planning calendar
Project Team Contract
Project Overview Design
Presentation Day Checklist
Audience Feedback form/Individual Feedback form/Teacher's Post Project Review form
Presentation Rubric
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pgs. 126-153
Parental and Community Support for Mathematics
Parent Communication is KEY
Communicating Mathematical Goals
Take early action when communicating with parents
Family and Community Math Nights
Pedagogy, Role of the Teacher
Cooperative Groups=share include, send letters home, math activity, invite parents home
Use of Technology
Practice and Problem Solving
Mathematics Content & Student Achievement
Principal Engagement and Support
Contrast old and new curriculum, discuss responses, experience, discuss emerging issues.
Communicate with Stakeholders

Van de Walle, J. A., Lovin, L. H., Karp, K. K., & Bay-Williams, J. M. (2014). Teaching student-centered mathematics (Vol. 2). Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.


Van de Walle, J. A., Lovin, L. H., Karp, K. K., & Bay-Williams, J. M. (2014). Teaching student-centered mathematics (Vol. 2). Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.


Van de Walle, J. A., Lovin, L. H., Karp, K. K., & Bay-Williams, J. M. (2014). Teaching student-centered mathematics (Vol. 2). Boston: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

PBL
Communicating with Parents
Assess Content Area Knowledge, Skills, and Conceptual Understanding
Assess Success Skills: Clear Learning Goals and Clear Demonstration of Skill
Create and Use Rubrics: Each product needs rubric, not a checklist, student-friendly language, formative assessment tool
Prevent Rubric Fatigue: Do not overwhelm by writing multiple rubrics
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pgs. 45-52
Technology is not necessary but useless
Criteria for selecting: 1) easy to use 2) will it last? 3) is it cost effective?
Use websites to conduct inquiry, manage work through use of technology (Google Docs), Create products and presentations
Collect work through technology (Dropbox, etc.)
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pg. 53-58.
Entry Event can take many forms:
Discussions
Field Trip
Conduct a demonstration or activity,
Give Students correspondence presenting challenge
Visit websites
Show a video or scene from film
Read a provocative piece of text
Present puzzlement
Use art
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pgs. 59-62
Plan backwards to anticipate unforeseen problems
Project Calendar to keep on task

Send letters home, post on class website, send email! Remind them of importance of parent involvment.
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pgs. 63-69
Decide if project needs teams or whole group
Who places students on the teams? Peers, teacher, etc
What is the ideal number of team members? consider the project
How will you decide who should be on the teams?
Hallerman, S., Lamer, J., PBL in the Elementary Grades. (2011). Buck Institute for Education. pg. 86
Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (2015). Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Carpenter, T. P., Fennema, E., Franke, M. L., Levi, L., & Empson, S. B. (2015). Children's Mathematics: Cognitively Guided Instruction (2nd ed.). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
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