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Romeo and Juliet Introduction

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by

Valerie White

on 23 February 2012

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Transcript of Romeo and Juliet Introduction

SHAKESPEARE Romeo
and
Juliet "All the world's a stage,
and all the men and women merely players:
they have their exits and their entrances;
and one man in his time plays many parts..." Stratford-upon-Avon William Shakespeare's
birthplace in England. 1564-1616
Lived 52 years Shakespeare's Family Wife- Anne Hathaway 3 children- Susanna
Hamnet
Judith Tragedies:
Antony and Cleopatra
Coriolanus
Hamlet
Julius Caesar
King Lear
Macbeth
Othello
Romeo and Juliet
Timon of Athens
Titus Andronicus
Troilus and Cressida

Shakespeare's Many Texts Histories:
Cymbeline
Henry IV, Part I
Henry IV, Part II
Henry V
Henry VI, Part I
Henry VI, Part II
Henry VI, Part III
Henry VIII
King John
Pericles
Richard II
Richard III

Comedies:
All's Well That Ends Well
As You Like It
Comedy of Errors
Love's Labour's Lost
Measure for Measure
Merchant of Venice
Merry Wives of Windsor
Midsummer Night's Dream
Much Ado about Nothing
Taming of the Shrew
Tempest
Twelfth Night
Two Gentlemen of Verona
Winter's Tale

Shakespeare was not just a playwright
but also wrote sonnets and poems. Sonnet #18:

Shall I compare the to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rought winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed,
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:
But they eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
The Globe Theater Built in 1598
London, England Built in an octagonal shape.
3 stories high
100 feet diameter Stage:
43 feet wide
23 feet deep 1500 people could sit
comfortably inside the
Globe Theater. Prologue:
Two households, both alike in dignity,
In fair Verona, where we lay our scene,
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,
Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life;
Whose misadventured piteous overthrows
Do with their death bury their parents' strife.
The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love,
And the continuance of their parents' rage,
Which, but their children's end, nought could remove,
Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage;
The which if you with patient ears attend,
What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend. Juliet's Balcony Verona, Italy Famous Lines "A plague on both your houses."
Romeo and Juliet, Act III, scene i "All the world's a stage."
As You Like It, Act II, scene vii "What a piece of work is a man."
Hamlet, Act II, scene ii "Et tu Brute?"
Julius Caesar, Act III, scene i The Ballet The Movies Visual Performance Modern Twists Leonardo DiCaprio
Claire Danes
1996 Romeo and Juliet Leonard Whiting
Olivia Hussey
1968 Shakespeare In Love Elizabethan Period Clothing/Dress Music Class System Royalty Not so Royal
aka Peasants Nobility Gentry Yeomanry Poor Lived luxurious lives Inherited Kings Ran the country Knights Squires Gentlemen They did not have to work
with their hands for money. Gentlewomen Farmers Tradesmen Craftsmen Lived simple lives Ususally had land or a shop in town Peasants Servants Sick or Disabled Orphans Beggars Vagabonds Most work hard for little
payment or recognition. Some just give up Lute Fife Viol All of the actors were men.

Many died from lead poisoning in the make up. Who is on whose' side? Capulets Montagues Lord Montague Lady Montague Romeo Benvolio cousins Balthasar Servant Abram Servant Lord Capulet Lady Capulet Juliet Tybalt Nurse Peter cousins Nurse servant Sampson Gregory servants Other Tragic Lovers http://www.shakespearesglobe.com/about-us/virtual-tour
Queens
Full transcript