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QR Codes:

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by

Jesse Huseth

on 11 April 2014

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Transcript of QR Codes:

QR Codes:
What are they?

QR codes are essentially a modified barcode designed to handle information, called upon and used by an optical scanner instead of the laser-type scanner needed for tools such as the original barcode. These nifty tools have had their usage expanded in the modern day, gaining such usage as advertisement, shipping, security, and, yes, even education!

QR Codes have produced an array of uses inside the classroom in order to encourage learning and involvement with the content.

Want to know more about QR Codes? Have some information!

More Tech!
Integration! Integration! Integration!

It is the rallying cry of educational specialists, teachers, parents, and students alike! With the evolution of technology, not only has information become more easily accessible to the average student, but the rate at which this information can be accessed has kept pace! Former means of linking students with information, the URL, is even fallen by the wayside. Enter the QR Code! QR Code integration into the classroom has opened many doors for different educators at different levels. In this presentation, we will go over some of those doors, and how the QR code affects them.
Differentiation
In today's classrooms, differentiation is a pillar of education. Educators need to employ different methods in order to reach different students on different level of content mastery and intellectual prowess. QR Codes can serve in two different fashions.
Method 1: Content
Using QR Codes can insert a fun and different way to get students to interact with varying forms of content. Educators can use QR Codes to both aid the students in content retrieval as well as make content discovery different and fun!

Need an example? Using QR Codes, we can link students to both articles concerning topics and helpful videos for those learners that are more audio and visual.
Method 2:Pride Preservation
As a new teacher, I've had a few struggles concerning differentiation with my lower students. Even if a student is academically struggling, they tend to be rather clever. When a student is handed lower work or told to go to a site that tends to be “simpler” than others, there can be an adverse reaction, specifically having to do with motivation. QR Codes give to the ability to prevent that kind of overt ostracization that can come with passing out lower level work. Keep shifting around how you present QR Codes, and educators can preserve a student's dignity while at the same time issuing level appropriate work!
Interaction
In the modern day classroom, issuing out papers, instructions, and educational assets can get clunky. There is a lot to keep up with in a classroom, and email can make things more difficult. QR Codes can take some of that burden away from teachers and students and make things a bit simpler and require dramatically less time. Not only that, but interaction with QR Codes can be used as an encouragement to intellectual curiosity.
Method 1: Handout, Exercised, Etc.
As an educator, it is very likely that you make hundreds of copies a day, issuing all of these papers to students in hopes that they don't lose them, in hopes that these papers come back to you, and then in hopes that you can re-issue grades back to them. QR codes can save a lot of headache here. In the modern educational system, it makes sense for educators to create and maintain personal websites in order to organize classes and make assets available to students. Want to give a lesson on Chapter 2 with a related handout? Giving out a QR Code not only saves you time in printing, but it also removes the likely-hood of a student losing it as well. The same goes for in class exercises! Classrooms become less busy with papers everywhere, thus saving time and money.
Method 2:
Cumbersome URLs
Passing on interesting or pertinent articles to students is best done through an electronic medium. Time and resources can't be spent printing out a multiple page article for 100+ students. However, linking students to helpful sites can be made cumbersome still by lengthy, randomized URLs. Have something in the dropbox that they can access, or how about a youtube video that aids in understanding? Don't have students try and make sense of inane numbers and letters when with a click of their phone or iPad, they have it located, saved, and ready to go!
Interaction
In the modern day classroom, issuing out papers, instructions, and educational assets can get clunky. There is a lot to keep up with in a classroom, and email can make things more difficult. QR Codes can take some of that burden away from teachers and students and make things a bit simpler and require dramatically less time. Not only that, but interaction with QR Codes can be used as an encouragement to intellectual curiosity.
Method 1: Hands on Experience
There are many different ways that a student can take advantage of a QR Code inside the classroom or concerning classroom activities. Perhaps have the students use simple sites like goo.gl to convert complicated URLs into QR Codes, then using said codes to give presentations. Perhaps turn the tables and have students store assignments in dropboxes or on other websites and have them turn in a QR Code? Save everyone some time and teach students a skill!
Method 2: Further Exploration
Students are becoming more and more adapted to technology. Everyday, there are new apps out there at the fingertips of these learners, but it seems like an insurmountable task to get them in contact with ones that can enhance their education. QR Codes are simple enough to master within a few minutes, but time saving enough that they can serve as an encouragement to explore other means to simplify or expand a student's learning/work processes! QR Codes can serve as a catalyst for technological integration not only for educators but for students as well.
Conclusion
QR Codes may have emerged as a way to streamline the transportation of thousands of tiny working parts, but the usage for these tools has evolved dramatically. Beyond being used for trendy advertising, QR Codes can serve as a stepping stone for students and educators alike towards a more integrated classroom. They serve multiple needs beyond mere convenience, making them a flexible and powerful tool within the educational system.
Works Cited
Burns, Monica. “Five Reasons I Love Using QR Codes in My Classroom.” Edutopia. 23 January, 2013. Web. 8 April, 2014. <http://www.edutopia.org/blog/using-qr-codes-in-classroom-monica-burns>

Burns, Monica. “Using QR Codes to Differentiate Instruction.” Edutopia. 25 September, 2013. Web. 8 April, 2014. <http://www.edutopia.org/blog/qr-codes-to-differentiate-instruction-monica- burns>

Burns, Monica. “Introducing Mobile Technology Into Your Classroom: Structures and Routines.” Edutopia. 10 April, 2013. Web. 8 April, 2014. <http://www.edutopia.org/blog/introducing- mobile-tech-structures-routines-monica-burns>

Lampinen, Michelle. “Interactive Rubrics as Assessment for Learning.” Edutopia. 3 December, 2013. Web. 8 April, 2014.<http://www.edutopia.org/blog/interactive-rubrics-assessment-for-learning- michelle-lampinen>

Miller, Andrew. “Twelve Ideas for Teaching with QR Codes.” Edutopia. 5 December, 2011. Web. 8 April, 2014. <http://www.edutopia.org/blog/QR-codes-teaching-andrew-miller>
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