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THE TIME MACHINE

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Rose Jajarmi

on 11 June 2014

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Transcript of THE TIME MACHINE

THE TIME MACHINE
THESIS
WORKS CITED LIST
CONCLUDING STATEMENT
STRUGGLE
SEPARATION
RETURN
Hero with a Thousand Faces
ENGLISH CULMINATING ACTIVITY
FACTS ABOUT THE TIME MACHINE
The protagonist, the Time Traveller, lives in the 1890s in London, England
Is a scientist who is living quite comfortably in a large house with servants
invites a group of intellectuals in the beginning to explain how he is able to move across the fourth dimension-time
Creates a Time Machine in order to explore time
Travels into the future to the year 802, 701 CE.
FACTS ABOUT THE TIME MACHINE C'td
While in the future he meets two races who have descended from humans; the flesh-eating Morlocks and the effete and childlike Eloi
The Morlocks steal his Time Machine away
He stays with the Eloi in the future for a week and befriends an Eloi called Weena
Comes across a museum in a state of decay
Weena disappears- we do not find out her fate
The Time Traveller is eventually reclaims his machine and decides to travel farther into the future, until the Earth dies
Comes back to his original time and tells his tale, and then the next day goes back on his Time Machine and is not seen again
Call to Adventure: The Time Traveller begins the novel very eager to explore time in the Time Machine he created-- he appears unsatisfied with his current life
Quote:““Upon that machine,” said the Time Traveller, holding the lamp aloft, “I intend to explore time. Is that plain? I was never more serious in my life.” (Wells,10)

Refusal of the Call: While in the midst of travelling through time, he begins to feel frightened that he may not survive the landing and refuses to stop the machine
Quote:“The peculiar risk lay in the possibility of my finding some substance in space in which I, or the machine, occupied…to come to a stop involved the jamming of myself, molecule by molecule, into whatever lay my way…Now the risk was inevitable, I no longer saw it in the same cheerful light.”” (Wells, 21)

Crossing the First Threshold: When he first steps foot in the future, he willingly follows the Eloi as they lead him to their home
Quote:““…and so I was [willingly] led past the sphinx of white marble [by the Eloi]…towards a vast grey edifice of fretted stone.”’ (Wells, 27)

Belly of the Whale: Almost immediately after meeting the Eloi, he begins to live with them and learn their ways
Quote: " [...]and so we entered, I, dressed in dingy nineteenth-century graments, looking grotesque enough, garlanded with flowers, and surrounded by an eddying mass of bright, soft-coloured robes and shining white limbs, in a melodious whirl of laughter and laughing speech. (Wells, 28)
Road of Trials: Shortly after his arrival into the future, the Time Traveller discovers that his Time Machine has been stolen by the man/Eloi-eating Morlocks and is thus stranded.
Quote:“Can you imagine what I felt as this conviction came home to me? The Time Machine was gone!” (Wells 37).

Woman as Temptress: While stranded, he decides to befriend an Eloi called Weena. He becomes emotionally attached to her which serves as a distraction on his quest to reclaim his machine
Quote: “… I had as much trouble as comfort from her devotion… Nor until it was too late did I clearly understand what she was to me…the little doll of a creature presently gave my return to the neighbourhood of the White Sphinx almost the feeling of coming home.” (Wells 47).

Meeting with the Goddess: While the Time Traveller is exploring the future, he comes across a museum that is in the midst of decay.
Quote: "I found the Palace of Green Porcelain [also known as a museum], when we approached it about noon, deserted and falling into ruin." (Wells, 70)

Ultimate Boon: Eventually, by physically fighting the Morlocks off, he is able to reclaim the Time Machine and immediately escapes from the current time period
Quote: “The [Morlocks’] clinging hands slipped from me. The darkness presently fell from my eyes. I found myself in the same grey light and tumult I have already described [as I travelled into the future].” (Wells 89).
Refusal of Return: Instead of returning back to his own time and share his newfound knowledge, he decides to travel
farther
into the future
Quote: “Now, instead of reversing the levers [after I had finally gained back my Time Machine], I had pulled them over so as to go forward with them…into futurity” (Wells 90)

Magic Flight: After deciding he's had enough when he witnesses the end of Earth, he goes back to his own time with the Time Machine
Quote: “So I came back [in my Time Machine… to the starting-point” (Wells 96)

Master of Two Worlds: The Time Traveller comes back long enough to share with his guests (whom he had invited them over before he left) what he has learned, the leaves on the Time Machine the next day, and has not been heard from since.
Quote:“One cannot choose but wonder. Will he ever return? It may be that he swept back into the past…Or did he go forward…” (Wells 102)
Wells, H. G. The Time Machine. New York: Heritage, 1964. Print.
Even in the future, when humanity is a shell of what it once was, humans still contain within them the potential to show love and affection.
Weena, the Time Traveller's one friend in the future, was able to befriend the Time Traveller and she and the Time Traveller were able to create a genuine bond which he relies on in order to stay sane.
She gives him a flower that he carries with him to the present which comes to represent hope for mankind.
Therefore, the protagonist of this novel, the Time Traveller, clearly displays many of the events within the Monomyth journey. He undergoes a separation from his normal life, then faces many struggles, and is eventually able to become a master of two worlds. In the end, it is seen how he understands the importance of his friendship with Weena through his narration of his tale. He comes to learn and understand about the human connection.
This is a picture I made of some key figures or items in the novel (which is also my creative component)
Entropy- defined as lack of order of predictability; gradual decline into disorder.
This is seen in the novel as the human civilization, once ordered and intelligent, begins to become disorganized and useless, as shown by the Eloi.
Class distinction is a also a theme in the novel-- one could see the Morlocks and Eloi as an allegory for the upper and the lower class.
THEMES
SYMBOLS
One symbol in the novel is the Time Machine, which represents scientific inquiry, since it is a device used by the Time Traveller in order to satisfy his intellectual curiousity.
Another symbol would be the White Sphinx, which is a construction in the future. It has a direct connection with the Time Traveller's plight since it contains the stolen Time Machine within thus making it a barrier between him and escaping. It also is symbolic of mankind's future because the sphinx is known for it's worship of the Egyptian sun god, Ra. The Time Traveller needs to break the Sphinx in order to retrieve the Time Machine. This can be seen as the Time Traveller breaking tradition and superstition and embracing rational thinking to travel back in time.
The Time Traveller, comes accross a museum in the future that has been abandoned, which can represent the loss of knoweledge.
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