Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Exploring Identity through Art

No description
by

David Lackner

on 4 December 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Exploring Identity through Art

Anticipatory Set

Influences on Identity
(Lesson 1)
Create a Self Portrait Representing One’s Identity
(Lesson 2)

In this lesson, students will create a self portrait which explores personal identity.
Students will reference self-portraits from art history.
Students will explore the methods in which formal elements of art can be used to express identity.
Personal Identity
Identity as an Enduring Idea
Studying what makes one’s identity is part of every person’s process of coming of age. Students will be asked to consider concepts such as: what makes a person an individual, why a person acts a certain way, what a person believes (spiritually, ideologically, politically, socially, etc.), what a person feels and thinks, and so on. Students investigating the makeup of their identity through art will have the opportunity for self-discovery and self-expression which will combine all of their previous experiences into a unit of artworks
Evidence of Student Understanding
• Student work will reflect a working understanding of who they are at this point in their lives.
• Students will refer to historical techniques and examples of self-portraiture throughout art history.
• Students work will reflect empathy and understanding for the group which they will represent through a work of art.

Exploring Identity through Art
Representing the Identity of a Group or Culture through Art
(Lesson 3)
In this lesson students will complete a work of art which communicates the identity of a group or culture.
Students will explore the effectiveness of symbolism.
Students will compare and contrast the expression of individual identity and the expression of a group's identity.
Guiding questions
What makes up my identity?
What factors influence my identity?
What/who might cause me to suppress my identity?
How do I express my identity?

Students will write their responses on a 3x5 note card and teacher will guide discussion.
This lesson will integrate PA English Standards.
Students will write an essay exposing parallels between the identity of a cultural group to factors contributing to their own sense of identity.
Identity of a Group
Excerpts from the film "Baraka"
Guiding Questions
What forms the identity of a group?
Why might a group hide or suppress their identity?
How is identity expressed as a group?
How does a group mentality differ from an individual’s?

Students will write their responses on a 3x5 note card and teacher will guide discussion


Research and Writing
Students will choose one group who's identity they will research.
Students will write a 300 word essay detailing the aspects of their chosen group.
Students will draw parallels between how that group expresses their identity and how they express their individual identity.
Objectives and Standards
Objective 1:
Students will collect their responses to questions regarding individual identity and group identity on a 3x5 notecard.
English Standard:
1.5.8.B. Develop content appropriate for the topic.

Objective 2:
Students will compose their essay in a manner which conveys a clear topic or message.
English Standard:
1.5.8.A. Write with a clear focus, identifying topic, task, and audience and establishing a single point of view.

Objective 3:
Students will compose an essay investigating personal identity and group identity as expressed through artworks.
Art Standard:
9.4.8.A. Compare and contrast examples of
group and individual philosophical meanings of works in the arts and humanities.

Anticipatory set
Viewing Portraits from Art History
Lecture on Historical Portraiture and Style
Teacher will provide information on several methods which have been used by artists in portraiture.
Students will take notes on 3x5 cards based on the following guiding questions:

How does this artwork affect the viewer?
What message is intended?
How are the formal elements working to achieve an overall effect?
Brainstorming and Creation of Self-Portrait
Students will refer back to the note cards which were used in the first lesson detailing aspects that contribute to personal identity
Students will use a mirror or photograph to use as a subject reference.
Teacher will demonstrate various drawing techniques.
Students will use pencil to sketch and colored pencils to render their portrait.
Discussion and Critique
How does this image portray an individual?
What style(s) from art history are present?
How are the formal elements used in this portrait?
How does this image portray the intended feelings of the student/artist?
Student works will be hung up in the front of the classroom.
Students will critique the works using the following guiding questions:
Objectives and Standards
Objective 1:
Students will analyze formal elements present in portraiture from history.
Art Standard:
9.3.8.A. Know and use the critical process of the examination of works in the arts and humanities.

Objective 2:
Students will create a self-portrait which is representative of their identity.
Art Standard:
9.1.8.E. Communicate a unifying theme or point of view through the production of works in the arts.

Objective 3:
Students will analyze varied styles of portraiture from history.
Art Standard:
9.2.8.D. Analyze a work of art from its historical and cultural perspective.

Anticipatory Set
"Identity" (Short Film)
Viewing Art which Represents Various Cultures
Discussion
Students will respond to the following questions on a 3x5 note card:
How should the individuals themselves be represented?
Is it more or less effective to include figures/portraits within a work representing a group identity? Why?
How might an image representing a group’s identity include or exclude renderings of the human figure?
What role does symbolism play in representing the identity of a group?
What items or objects can be used as symbols in a work reflecting the identity of a group?

Teacher will guide class discussion based on student responses.
Brainstorming and Demonstration
Students will choose a group that they will represent in an image.
Students may choose either the group they researched in the first lesson, or choose a new group to represent.
Teacher will demonstrate the usage and effectiveness of thumbnail sketches.
Students will complete several thumbnail sketches to help in the layout of their composition.
Creation of Group Identity Artwork
Students will complete several thumbnail sketches.
Composition will be approved by teacher.
Students will use pencil to sketch and colored pencils to complete their group identity artwork.
Discussion and Critique
What imagery is present?
How does this imagery express the identity of the chosen subject matter?
Are there symbolic images present? What do you think they represent/are intended to represent?
How does this imagery relate to the chosen group, organization, or culture?
How do the formal elements of the piece relate to the identity they are intended to express/represent?
Student artworks will be posted in the front of the classroom, and the teacher will guide discussion and critique of the works using the following guiding questions:
Objectives and Standards
Objective 1:
Students will compare and contrast the expression of individual and group identities in artworks.
Art Standard:
9.4.8. A. Compare and contrast examples of group and individual philosophical meanings of works in the arts and humanities.

Objective 2:
Students will create a work of art which represents the identity of a group of people.
Art Standard:
9.1.5.E. Communicate a unifying theme or point of view through the production of works in the arts.

Objective 3:
Students will evaluate the finished artworks of their classmates.
English Standard: 1.6.8.A.
Listen critically and respond to others in small and large group situations.
•Respond with grade level appropriate questions, ideas, information, or opinions.

Assessment
This unit will be assessed using a rubric which will focus on the following areas:
Identity Essay:
Connections, mechanics, and format
Identity Self Portrait:
Personal representation, references from art history
Group Identity Artwork:
Communication of group identity, use of formal elements
Discussion:
Active participation, thoughtful responses, respect for peers
Notes/sketches:
Active involvement, willingness to explore

Key Concepts:
Identity is expressed in numerous self-portraits by artists throughout history.
The methods for expressing identity through art are vast and limitless.
Some art expresses not only the identity of the artist, but of a group of people which they represent/are representing.
Essential Questions
How can identity be altered by influences outside one’s-self.
When is identity suppressed?
How do your beliefs affect you identity?
Unit Objectives
Students will take time for discovery and in-depth thought in regards to their identity: what makes them the way they are and why.
Students will express their identity through the creation of a self-portrait.
Students will represent the identity of a group of people through a work of art.


About this Unit:
Full transcript