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BIOLOGY PROJECT

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Kimtrang Nguyen

on 26 January 2014

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Transcript of BIOLOGY PROJECT

BIOLOGY PROJECT
Kimtrang Nguyen
Mosses & Ferns
Conifers
japanese red pine
Flowering plants
THE SENSITIVE PLANT
luminous MOSS
bLUE MORPHO
BUTTERFLY
Invertebrates
cANE TOAD
Amphibians
Birds
Reptiles
Fish
Montremes & Marsupials
Placental Mammals
Hedgehog
PLATYPUS
BLUE tang
CAPE DWARF
CHAMELEON
Striated Pardalote
Kingdom – Plantae
Phylum – Bryophyta
Class – Bryopsida
Order – Schistostegiales
Family – Schistostegaceae
Genus – Schistostega
Species – Schistostega pennata
Kingdom – Plantae
Phylum – Tracheophyta
Class – Pinopsida
Order – Pinales
Family – Pinaceae
Genus – Pinus
Species – Pinus Densiflora
Kingdom – Plantae
Phylum – Magnoliophyta
Class – eudicots
Order – Fabales
Family – Fabaceae
Genus – Mimosa
Species – Mimosa pudica
Kingdom – Animalia
Phylum – Arthropoda
Class – Insecta
Order – Lepidoptera
Family – Nymphalidae
Genus – Morpho
Species – Menelaus

Kingdom – Animalia
Phylum – Amphibia
Class – Amphibia
Order – Anura
Family – Bufonidae
Genus – Rhinella
Species – Rhinella marina
Kingdom – Animalia
Phylum – Chordata
Class – Aves
Order – Passeriformes
Family – Pardalotidae
Genus – Pardalotus
Species – Pardalotus striatus

Kingdom – Animalia
Phylum – Chordata
Class – Reptilia
Order – Squamata
Family – Chamaeleonidae
Genus – Bradypodion
Species – Bradypodion pumilum
Kingdom – Animalia
Phylum – Chordata
Class – Actinopterygii
Order – Perciformes
Family – Acanthuridae
Genus – Paracanthurus
Species – Paracanthurus hepatus
Kingdom – Animalia
Phylum – Chordata
Class – Mammalia
Order – Monotremata
Family – Ornithorhynchidae
Genus – Ornithorhynchus
Species – Ornithorhynchus anatinus
Kingdom – Animalia
Phylum – Chordata
Class – Mammalia
Order – Erinaceomorpha
Family – Erinaceidae
Genus – Erinaceus
Species – Erinaceus europaeus
The luminous moss is also known as goblin's gold or luminescent moss and looks like green glowing mats in caves, cavities between rocks or under tree roots. The plant is approximately 1 cm tall, an eukaryotic and ectothermic organism. The glowing affect of this plant occurs due to small cell which are able to reflect light called protonema. The chlorplasts in the plant is what gives the glowing light it's green colour. The reflected light can not only attract animals but fend off any animals which may damage the plant.
The plant survives in high humidity, shady and cool areas. It is only in places with high humidity or standing water where this plant can reproduce. The plant can be mainly found in the northern hemisphere. The plant can be found in areas such as North America, Japan and Europe.
The plant obtains its nutrients through the process of photosynthesis meaning that the plant is an autotroph.
The glowing light that it produces attracts animals such as spiders, birds and mice which help spread the reproductive spores to other areas. The male reproductive organ is a bud and the female reproductive organ is a spore case.
The luminous moss is now considered to be a rare species due to the logging and development of houses is areas which have luminous moss colonies. The destruction of the area causes the lighting or humidity to change, making it difficult for the plant to survive. The plant itself is also very fragile, making it very easy to be destroyed.
general information
classification
habitat
reproduction
human impact
diet
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact
classification
general information
habitat
diet
reproduction
human impact

The Straited Pardalote is native to Australia and can live in almost environment as long as there are trees. However, it prefers eucalyptic forests and woodlands.
The bird's diet consists of a variety of insects and its larvae. This means that the bird is a heterotroph and is an insectivore.
The Striated Pardalote, also known as the Pickwick, Wittachew or Chip-Chip, is a small brightly coloured bird. It is approximately 9 to 12 cm in length and has a yellow face & throat, grey back and a red or yellow spot on the wide of its wings. The bird is a eukaryotic and endothermic organism.
The birds mate between June and January, where they form pairs or or a group of 6. Three to five white eggs are laid in a nest is usually close to the ground in a tree hollow or tree tunnel and are guarded against any predators. Both the male and female incubate and care for the young.
The Striated Pardalote is not an endangered species.
The cane toad, also known as the marine toad or giant neotropical toad, is a reddish-brown toad which is approximately 15 to 23 cm long and can weigh up to 1.8 kg. The toad is able to survive both on land and in the water and is adaptable to a range of climates and environments. It also has a gland is secretes a deadly venom
The cane toad is native to central and South America. However, the toad was introduced into Australia in 1935. They can be found in almost any kind of environment.
The toad will eat anything that it can catch and swallow. It's diet consists of mainly insects such as ants, crickets, spiders and beetles. The cane toad is a heterotroph and an omnivore.
The cane toad can reproduce up to twice at any time of the year but they prefer to mate during the wet season of North Australia. The female can lay from 8000 to 35000 eggs at once time in still or slow moving freshwater.
The cane toad is considered to be a pest in Australia due to its largely increasing population and the fact that it has very few predators due to its venom. There are group around Australia which catch as many cane toads as they can and then kill them humanely.
The Japanese Red Pine is a tree which is known to have orange-brown bark and is green all year round. However, the older bark turns into a silver-grey colour. The tree has been known to grow up to 35 metres, however generally only grows to 20 metres. The tree is a eukaryotic and ectothermic organism.
This pine tree gets its nutrients from photosynthesis and is an autotroph.
The hedgehog's diet consists of insects such as worms, centipedes, snails and some other larger animals such as mice, snakes and frogs. They are heterotrophs and carnivores.
The hedgehog is an eukaryotic and endotermic organism. The mammal has a thick coat made of sharp quills and is able to curl into a ball, extending its quills. Hedgehogs are usually brown, however, they can also be black, cream or gray. These nocturnal creatures hibernate when the weather is cold and sleep when the weather is hot or when there is a drought but can also remain active throughout the year if the weather conditions are moderate.
Hedgehogs are not an threatened species
Hedgehogs can be found in Africa, Asia and Europe. They prefer to live in forests, hedgerows, woodlands and meadows.
The hedgehogs pair together only for mating. They produce a litter ranging from one to eleven. The young stays with its mother for four to seven weeks.
The blue tang, also known as the regal tang or the indo-pacific tang, is eukaryotic and ectothermic organisms. They have a flat blue body with black markings and a yellow tail. They also have a blade on each side of their caudal peduncle and venomous fin spines. They are able to grow up to 30 cm long.
The the blue tang is still young, they eat mainly plankton only. However, when they reach adulthood, the Blue Tang is able to eat plankton, algae and some other fishes. This means that the Blue Tang is an omnivore and a heterotoph.
This fish prefers habitats such as coastal waters, coral reefs and inshore rock or grassy areas. The Blue Tang can be found in reefs around the world such as East Africa, Japan, Samoa, New Caledonia and the Great Barrier Reef.
The Blue Tang spawn during late afternoon and evening. Both the female and male fishes swim upwards to the surface of the water for the sperm and egg to be released. The egg is then fertilised in the water
The Blue Tang is often captured for aquarium trade, to be marketed and used as bait but is not considered to be vulnerable.
The platypus is a montremes, meaning that is is a mammal which lays eggs instead of giving birth to a live young. They have webbed feet, a thick furry coat, a tail which is approximately 10 to 15 cm long and a bill, which is used to turn mud to find insects. The male platypus has a deadly spur measuring to 1.5 cm inside both its hind legs. The spur is connected to a gland which secretes venom. The platypus is a eukaryotic and endothermic organism.
The platypus is native to Australia and can be found in Eastern Australia. They live in freshwater lakes and rivers and are able to create burrows for shelter and protection.
The platypus is a carnivore and heterotroph. Its diet consists of insect larvae, worms and freshwater insects.
The platypus mates once a year between June and October. The female lays two to four eggs and incubates them for 2 weeks.
The platypus was once hunted for its fur, however, they are now protected. The platypus is not considered to be endangered.
The Cape Dwarf Chameleon is a eukaryotic and ectothermic organism. Although this lizard has camouflaging abilities, it is leaf-green with orange markings on both side of its body and on its head. The chameleon is able to grow up to 17 cm long. Its awkward and irregular movements are part of its camouflage act as it tried to imitate foliage being blown in the breeze. The lizard uses its camouflaging abilities to stalk its prey without being noticed or to hide from its predators. It also has a tongue, which is more than twice the size of its body length, used to catch its prey.
The female gives birth to live young which are covered in a sticky bag. It takes a couple of minutes for the young to wriggle out of the bad. The females usually gives birth to a litter ranging from five to twelve young, which immediately become independent after coming out of the sticky bag.
The Cape Dwarf Chameleon can only be found in a small area of South-West Africa. The lizard prefers to live in small bushes, reeds and open or scrub covered country.
The chameleon is an insectivore and a heterotroph. Its mainly eats flying insects such as small grasshoppers and crickets.
The Cape Dwarf Chameleon is not considered to be an endangered species.
The Blue Morpho Butterfly can be found in some parts of Mexico and in Central and South America. The butterfly prefers to live in rainforests.
The Blue Morpho Butterfly is able to grow up to 15 cm wide making them one of the largest butterflies. Although their wings may seem blue to the human eye, the wing is actually covered in scales which reflect blue light only. However, the underwing of the butterfly is a brown with eyespots. This can be used as camouflage against predators when its wings are closed. Due to the contrasting colours of the wings and underwings, its creates an illusion of disappearing and appearing when in flight.
The butterfly is a herbivore and heterotroph. As a caterpillar, it chew on leaves, but as a butterfly, it uses its proboscis to suck tree sap, the juices from rotten fruit, fungi and mud.
The butterfly lays eggs onto leave, which then hatch into caterpillars.
The butterfly is currently severely threatened due to the deforestation of its natural habitat. Not only this, but due to its beauty, they are caught for display. There are several butterfly houses in North America which are trying to conserve this butterfly.
The sensitive plant is a herb which is also known as the touch-me-not and sleeping plant. It is a eukaryotic and ectothermic organism. It is able to grow from 15 to 45 cm high and has side stalks which are able to have 12 to 20 pairs of green oval leaves. Each leaf measure 1 or less cm. The plant also has flowers which looks like lilac or pink fluffy balls and reddish brown or purple steams which pricks. The plant is called "the sensitive plant" because when touched, the leaves will close.
This plant is native to tropical America and now can be found in Singapore and north-east of Australia. The herb's prefers to live in open waste grounds in tropical vegetation.
Since the touch-me-not is a plant, this means that it obtains nutrients from photosynthesis and is an autotroph.
The plant's seed cling onto people and animals.
This species is not considered to be threatened.
The Japanese Red Pine is native to Japan, but can also be found in Korea. The preferred habitat of this pine tree are in areas with acidic soil or a place where there has been a fire or a disturbance.
Both the pollen and seed cones appear in early Spring. The male pollen cone is an orange-yellow colour. The female seed cone is a yellow to purple colour and fall from the tree when they are mature. They are usually 6cm long and the winged seeds inside the cone are 1.5 cm long.
The Japanese Red Pine tree is no threatened but there are several of these pine tree in protected areas.
bibliography
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Cane Toad - Department of Environment and Primary Industries. 2014. Cane Toad - Department of Environment and Primary Industries. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.dpi.vic.gov.au/agriculture/pests-diseases-and-weeds/pest-animals/a-z-of-pest-animals/cane-toad. [Accessed 26 January 2014].

Parks & Wildlife Service - Striated Pardalote. 2014. Parks & Wildlife Service - Striated Pardalote. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/indeX.aspX?base=13132. [Accessed 26 January 2014].
. 2014. . [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.kew.org/plants-fungi/Mimosa-pudica.htm. [Accessed 26 January 2014].


Blue Morpho Butterfly. 2014. Blue Morpho Butterfly. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.rainforestanimals.net/rainforestanimal/morphobutterfly.html. [Accessed 26 January 2014].
Animal A Day!: Cape Dwarf Chameleon. 2014. Animal A Day!: Cape Dwarf Chameleon. [ONLINE] Available at: http://animaladay.blogspot.com.au/2011/04/cape-dwarf-chameleon.html. [Accessed 26 January 2014].

Life of Blue Tang | Life of Sea. 2014. Life of Blue Tang | Life of Sea. [ONLINE] Available at: http://life-sea.blogspot.com.au/2011/11/life-of-blue-tang.html. [Accessed 26 January 2014].

Platypus Information. 2014. Platypus Information. [ONLINE] Available at: http://www.australianfauna.com/platypus.php. [Accessed 26 January 2014].

Hedgehogs, Hedgehog Pictures, Hedgehog Facts - National Geographic. 2014. Hedgehogs, Hedgehog Pictures, Hedgehog Facts - National Geographic. [ONLINE] Available at: http://animals.nationalgeographic.com.au/animals/mammals/hedgehog/. [Accessed 26 January 2014].

Pinus densiflora, the Japanese red pine. 2014. Pinus densiflora, the Japanese red pine. [ONLINE] Available at: http://botanyboy.org/pinus-densiflora-the-japanese-red-pine/. [Accessed 26 January 2014].
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