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Solar System

This Prezi was by my partner, Juan Castro and myself, Bruce Lopez.
by

Bruce Lopez

on 22 May 2013

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Transcript of Solar System


Comets are cosmic snowballs of frozen gases, rock and dust roughly the size of a small town. When a comet's orbit brings it close to the sun, it heats up and spews dust and gases into a giant glowing head larger than most planets. The dust and gases form a tail that stretches away from the sun for millions of kilometers. The Solar System is a very large and spectacular thing to talk about and you will find it very interesting to learn about it. It is made out of stars, ice, rocks, dust, planets and many more substances. There are about a billion stars in the system, more stars than there are sand grains on earth. There are 5 types of stars A red dwarf star, yellow star, blue giant star, Giant star Supergiant star. And it happens to be there aren’t as many planets. There are only eight planets in our solar system. There are also only two types of planets in our solar system . There are terrestrial planets and gas giant planets. The four Terrestrial planets are Earth,Venus,Mars, Mercury. The gas giants we have are Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune, Uranus. Who discovered the Solar System? There are several different scientist that contributed all their lives to science. But what we do know for sure is that Galileo discovered something big. He Discovered that Earth was not the center of the solar system , Jupiter Has four moons and Venus has a face like a moon!! He also discovered the rings of Saturn. Earth is the third planet from the Sun, and the densest and fifth-largest of the eight planets in the Solar System. It is also the largest of the Solar System's four terrestrial planets. It is sometimes referred to as the world, the Blue Planet, or by its Latin name, Terra. Earth formed approximately 4.54 billion years ago, and life appeared on its surface within one billion years. s. Jupiter, the most massive planet in our solar system -- with dozens of moons and an enormous magnetic field -- forms a kind of miniature solar system. Jupiter does resemble a star in composition, but it did not grow big enough to ignite. The planet's swirling cloud stripes are punctuated by massive storms such as the Great Red Spot, which has raged for hundreds of years.
Dark, cold and whipped by supersonic winds, Neptune is the last of the hydrogen and helium gas giants in our solar system. More than 30 times as far from the sun as Earth, the planet takes almost 165 Earth years to orbit our sun. In 2011 Neptune completed its first orbit since its discovery in 1846. Uranus is the only giant planet whose equator is nearly at right angles to its orbit. A collision with an Earth-sized object may explain Uranus' unique tilt. Nearly a twin in size to Neptune, Uranus has more methane in its mainly hydrogen and helium atmosphere than Jupiter or Saturn. Methane gives Uranus its blue tint.

. Little chunks of rock and debris in space are called meteoroids. They become meteors - or shooting stars - when they fall through a planet's atmosphere; leaving a bright trail as they are heated to incandescence by the friction of the atmosphere. Pieces that survive the journey and hit the ground are called meteorites.

The Kuiper Belt is a disc-shaped region of icy objects beyond the orbit of Neptune -- billions of kilometers from our sun. Pluto and Eris are the best known of these icy worlds. There may be hundreds more of these ice dwarfs out there. Not counting transient events such as gamma-ray bursts, the brightest object in the gamma-ray sky is the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This glow results from a vast sea of cosmic-ray particles slamming into interstellar gas and dust, generating gamma rays. When we leave the solar system, we find our star and its planets are just one small part of the Milky Way galaxy. The Milky Way is a huge city of stars, so big that even at the speed of light, it would take 100,000 years to travel across it. All the stars in the night sky, including our Sun, are just some of the residents of this galaxy, along with millions of other stars too faint to be seen.

Beyond our own galaxy lies a vast expanse of galaxies. The deeper we see into space, the more galaxies we discover. There are billions of galaxies, the most distant of which are so far away that the light arriving from them on Earth today set out from the galaxies billions of years ago. So we see them not as they are today, but as they looked long before there was any life on Earth.
Mercury is the innermost planet in the Solar System. It is also the smallest, and its orbit is the most eccentric of the eight planets. It orbits the Sun once in about 88 Earth days, completing three rotations about its axis for every two orbits.Sun-scorched Mercury is only slightly larger than Earth's Moon. People dedicate their lives to learning everything there is to know about about it. And we are going to teach you a thing or two right now. In fact, 75% of the gamma rays in our galaxy come from these cosmic-ray interactions. This bright gamma-ray glow gives the GLAST science team a golden opportunity to study the structure, composition, and dynamics of the interstellar material that pervades our home galaxy. The Kuiper Belt and even more distant Oort Cloud are believed to be the home of comets that orbit our sun. The reason the Moon doesn't hit the Earth (and the Earth and other planets don't hit the Sun) is that the Moon is moving fast enough to miss the Earth. Like the Moon, Mercury has very little atmosphere to stop impacts, and it is covered with craters. Mercury's dayside is superheated by the sun, but at night temperatures drop hundreds of degrees below freezing. Ice may even exist in craters. Jupiter's appearance is a tapestry of beautiful colors and atmospheric features. Most visible clouds are composed of ammonia. Water vapor exists deep below and can sometimes be seen through clear spots in the clouds. The planet's "stripes" are dark belts and light zones created by strong east-west winds in Jupiter's upper atmosphere. Earth's biosphere then significantly altered the atmospheric and other basic physical conditions, which enabled the proliferation of organisms as well as the formation of the ozone layer, which together with Earth's magnetic field blocks harmful solar radiation, and permitted formerly ocean-confined life to move safely to land. The physical properties of the Earth, as well as its geological history and orbit, have allowed life to persist. Estimates on how much longer the planet will be able to continue to support life range from 500 million years, to as long as 2.3 billion year The Solar System
By Bruce Lopez
Haven’t you ever wondered how in the world the planets stay in place? Gravity from the Sun is what keeps the planets in orbit around the Sun, just as gravity from the Earth is what keeps the Moon and satellites and the space shuttle in orbit around the Earth. Who discovered the Solar System? There are only eight planets in our solar system. There are also only two types of planets in our solar system . There are terrestrial planets and gas giant planets. The four Terrestrial planets are Earth,Venus,Mars, Mercury. The gas giants we have are jupiter, saturn, neptune, Uranus. Not counting transient events such as gamma-ray bursts, the brightest object in the gamma-ray sky is the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. This glow results from a vast sea of cosmic-ray particles slamming into interstellar gas and dust, generating gamma rays. In fact, 75% of the gamma rays in our galaxy come from these cosmic-ray interactions. This bright gamma-ray glow gives the GLAST science team a golden opportunity to study the structure, composition, and dynamics of the interstellar material that pervades our home galaxy.
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