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Mount Everest & The Gas Laws

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by

Amanda Orsillo

on 14 March 2013

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Transcript of Mount Everest & The Gas Laws

CLIMBING MOUNT EVEREST
& THE GAS LAWS HOW THE LUNGS WORK CLIMBING MOUNT EVEREST APPLICATION TO THE GAS LAWS KINETIC MOLECULAR THEORY How do climbers train for Mount Everest?

How do higher altitudes affect the respiratory system of a human?

How does a "rebreather" help a climber reach the top of Mt. Everest? higher the altitude the thinner the air
body must work harder to pass more air through lungs
body adapts to lower oxygen levels by increasing production of red blood cells
----red blood cells carry oxygen throughout -----the body pressure of a gas is caused by the collision of molecules within the walls of the container
gas particles move in straight paths
they collide with walls of container
FACTS 4,000 people attempted to climb 660 were successful 212 died trying to climb ? ? ? at 26,000 ft ("Death Zone"), climbers must use breathing apparatus by using a "rebreather" pure oxygen = an elevated partial pressure of oxygen in the blood
climber breathing pure oxygen at summit of Mt. Everest = greater oxygen partial pressure than breathing air at sea level
= being able to exert greater physical effort at altitude BOYLE'S LAW inhale = diaphragm and ribcage enlarge
thoracic cavity volume increases
when volume increases, pressure decreases
exhale= diaphragm and ribcage return to previous volume
volume of thoracic cavity decreases, pressure inside lung increases PV=k Graham's Law of Diffusion can be used to determine the safety of certain altitudes
speed of molecules = atmospheric pressure
low air pressure = stoppage of vital functions Dalton's Law of Partial Pressure respiration: breathe in oxygen and breathe out carbon dioxide
partial pressure of a gas= pressure of oxygen that determines how much oxygen is absorbed by the lungs of the climber
humans function best breathing 159.6 torr of partial pressure of oxygen
at higher elevations, partial pressure of oxygen is lower
on top of Mt. Everest= partial pressure of oxygen is 56.7 torr (1/3 of normal) Altitude Sickness caused by acute exposure to low partial pressure of oxygen at high altitude
commonly occurs above 2,400 meters
air density (number of molecules of oxygen per given volume decreases as altitude increases)
usually occurs following rapid ascent (500 meters) Symptoms:
difficulty sleeping
fatigue
dizziness
headache
rapid pulse
vomiting
shortness of breath summit temperature never rises above 0 degrees Celsius The Himalayan Jumping Spider can live up to 22,000 feet (6,700 meters) on Mount Everest. On the way to the summit, a climber will pass over 200 bodies of previous climbers. world's tallest mountain (29,029 ft)
3,000 individual have reached summit
every year Mt. Everest rises a few millimeters due to natural geological forces highest known permanent resident on Earth. $10,000 fee to Nepalese government
over the last 6 decades, about 210 individuals have died in attempt to climb
can affect pilots in unpressurized aircrafts, as well as climbers
can lead to heart attack
Advanced-In Flight Rebreather Impact on Society pressure inside climber's lungs is increased there are more frequent collisions of oxygen molecules How to Train swimming
running
biking
weight lifting
climbing gain weight
gain stamina
gain endurance Only about 1 in 4 people will succeed in the climb formed about 60 million years ago
named after Sir George Everest in 1865
first oxygenless ascent was done by Reinhold Messner
1993 was the worst year (129 died)
most die from avalanches (about 1 in 2)
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