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Vocabulary

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Amber Russell

on 4 June 2014

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Transcript of Vocabulary

vo·cab·u·lary (noun)
\vō-ˈka-byə-ˌler-ē, və-\

: the words that make up a language

: all of the words known and used by a person

: words that are related to a particular subject
Vocabulary -
"students' understanding
of oral and print words,"
Vocabulary
Strategy 2: Interactive Word Wall
Students post unfamiliar words on the word wall before, during, or after reading
Class works on word wall to define, share and interact with new terms
Strategy 3: Vocabulary Journals
Used during guided reading lessons, independent reading, and during reading across the content areas
Students log new words that they have learned from reading literature or textbooks
Journals then used to explore the words' meanings make connections between new words and their own experiences and ideas they already know, and produce rich definitions
Strategy 1: Graphic Morphemic Analysis
Teaching Vocabulary
5 Strategies



All About Adolescent Literacy. (n.d.). Key Literacy Component: Morphology. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.adlit.org/article/27876/

Antonacci, P., & Callaghan, C. M. (2012). Promoting literacy development 50 research-based strategies for K-8 learners. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, Inc.

Biology project. (n.d.). The University of Arizona . Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/biology/biocon.html

Bone, B. (2000). Lessons from a Vocabulary Journal. Voices From the Middle, 7(4), 17–23.

Brummitt-Yale, J. (n.d.). 10 great word wall strategies for classrooms. K12 Reader. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.k12reader.com/10-great-word-wall-strategies-for-classrooms/

Bryant, P., Nunes, T., & Barros, R. (2014). The connection between children's knowledge and use of grapho-phonic and morphemic units in written text and their learning at school. British Journal Of Educational Psychology, 84(2), 211-225. doi:10.1111/bjep.12030

Building Science Vocabulary. (n.d.). Teaching Channel. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/strategy-to-build-student-vocabulary

Caramagno, S. [Sophia Caramagno]. (2012, August 29). Vocabulary word map lesson. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipqmdH-LxU.

Chick, J. [Fairywalker12]. (2012, November 19). Morphemic analysis. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wK3UCJbClA

Corbin, P. (2005, January 1). Developing vocabulary through self-selected text. Reading curriculum vocabulary unit. Center for Adult Learning and Literacy a th University of Maine, Orono. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://www.maine.gov/doe/adulted/admin/curriculum/vocabulary.pdf

Cronsberry, J. (2004). Word Walls: A support for literacy in secondary school classrooms. Curriculum.org. Curriculum Services Canada. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://curriculum.orgstorage/258/1334340769World_Walls__A_Support_for_Literacy_in_Secondary_School_Classrooms.pdf

Ellery, V., & Rosenboom, J.L. (2011). Sustaining strategic readers: Techniques for supporting content literacy in grades 6-12. Newark, DE: International Reading Asssociation.

Graves, M. F. (2006). The vocabulary book: Learning and instruction. New York: Teachers College Press.

Graves, M. F. (2008). Instruction on individual words: One size does not fit all. In A. E. Farstrup & S. J. Samuels (Eds.), What research has to say about vocabulary instruction (pp. 56–79). Newark, DE: International Reading Association.

Grisham, D. L. (2013, October 23). Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy Plus (VSS+). literacy beat. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://literacybeat.com/2013/10/23/vocabulary-self-selection-strategy-plus-vss/

(Antonacci & Callaghan, 2012).
Breaks down the word into meaningful parts
Looks at the root words, affixes, prefixes, and/or suffixes to decipher the meaning of a word
Graphically allows students to visualize the construction of the word
Figure 1. Example of graphic morphemic analysis using the term immigrants. Reprinted from Antonacci, P., & Callaghan, C. M. (2012).
Promoting literacy development 50 research-based strategies for K-8 learners.
Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, Inc.
5 Internet resources for graphic morphemic analysis:
1. Rooting Out Meaning: Morpheme Match-Ups in the Primary Grades

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/rooting-meaning-morpheme-match-880.html?tab=4#tabs

Dr. Helen Hoffner has put together a 3 session activity that uses morpheme analysis to help students understand new words. By the end of the lesson, students will be able to use their knowledge of morphemes to define words, use an online dictionary to confirm the meaning and spelling of unfamiliar words, and combine morphemes to create words.

2. Common Content Area Roots and Affixes

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/printouts/common-content-area-roots-30842.html

Reproduced from Ellery & Resenboom's,
Sustaining strategic readers: techniques for supporting content literacy in grades 6-12
(2011), this printout offers about 50 different common roots, prefixes, and affixes, to help students decipher words that can be found across all of the content areas.

3. Key Literacy Component: Morphology

http://www.adlit.org/article/27876/

The National Institute for Literacy offers an explanation on the usefulness of morphology when teaching as well as some techniques on how to properly teach vocabulary using morphemes. Understanding to teach different morpheme patterns, using speed drills to develop automatic recognition, and teaching different types of syllables are all examples of what this source offers as suggestions to teachers.

4. The Sourcebook for Teaching Science: Dictionaries

http://www.csun.edu/~vceed002/ref/reference/dictionaries.html

Dr. Norman Herr a Science Education professor at California State University put together this large accumulation of resources that can be used to teach and learn using morphemes. The website offers links to useful dictionaries, teaching strategies, and many other resources that can be helpful to teaching science vocabulary and building upon your own.

5. Scientific Root Words, Prefixes, and Suffixes

http://www.biologyjunction.com/prefixes%20and%20suffixes.pdf

This is a large list of science root words, prefixes, and suffixes. Especially helpful when teaching science vocabulary. Often the meaning of the word can be broken down using this list and noticing trends in roots, prefixes, and suffixes allows for further understanding of new words in the future.
Video 1. Jenn Chick shows teachers how morphemic analysis can be used to help teach vocabulary, she also includes another graphic organizing style to help ensure student understanding. Video reposted from Chick, J. [Fairywalker12]. (2012, November 19).
Morphemic analysis.
[Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wK3UCJbClA
References:
Antonacci and Callaghan (2012), propose an 8 step process for implementing the graphic morphemic strategy.

1. Select a word from the assigned readings for teaching the strategy.

2. Engage students in a discussion on the purpose of the strategy.

3. Use a think-aloud to demonstrate how to divide a word into its parts.

4. Demonstrate how to examine each word part for its meaning.

5. Guide students through the process of using the graphic organizer to analyze a word and determine its meaning.

6. In the appropriate box, write the sentence that contains the target word.

7. Show students how to figure out the meaning of the word.

8. Check the meaning of the word with the dictionary definition.


Supporting research for using graphic morphemic analysis:
Kieffer and Lesaux (2007), found that vocabulary comprehension was grasped using morphemic analysis. Furthermore, they found that morphemic analysis was most effective when following four major principles, "(1) Teach morphology in the context of rich, explicit vocabulary instruction; (2) teach students to use morphology as a cognitive strategy with explicit steps; (3) teach underlying morphological knowledge in two ways—both explicitly and in context; and (4) for students with developed knowledge of Spanish, teach morphology in relation to cognates (pp. 139–142)."

Children’s knowledge and use of grapho-phonic and morphemic rules has a lasting effect on the progress that they make at school. This knowledge has an impact on their reading ability which in turn affects their success in learning about English, mathematics and science, (Bryant, Nunes, & Barros, (2014)."

In a small quasi-experimental study reported by White, Sowell, and Yanagihara (1989), results found that students who were taught to work with prefixes and suffixes when learning about vocabulary, outperformed those who were not.


Video directions for the use of morphemic analysis:
Graphic morphemic analysis:
Figure 2: an example of a cross-curricular word wall. Reposted from Pryde, K. (2012, November 1). Cross-Curricular Word Wall | The Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning.
The Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning
. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://heartandart.ca/?p=1334
Interactive word wall:
Step by step guide to implementing the interactive word wall, Antonacci and Callaghan, (2012).

1. Establish a purpose for using the word wall.

2. Select the words that are targeted for instruction.

3. Before reading, teach the words.

4. After reading, students may post words to the word wall.

5. Initiate activity around the word wall.
Supporting research for using interactive word walls:
Antonacci and Callaghan (2012), looked at a study by Harmon et al (2009), and found that "older as well as younger children need a print-rich environment that engages them in their own world learning and vocabulary development."

Saskatoon Public Schools (2009), promote the use of word walls as they "teach children to recognize and spell high frequency words, see patterns and relationship in words, build phonemic awareness skills, and apply phonics rules. Word walls also provide reference support for children during reading and writing activities."

Jennifer Cronsberry (2004), discussed the benefits of word walls for the Curriculum Services of Canada, stating that world walls:
Provide an approach to meaningful teaching of vocabulary with an emphasis on student engagement and higher level thinking skills;
build vocabulary, thereby improving reading comprehension and writing style;
reinforce understanding of subject-specific terminology with a focus on students internalizing key concepts;
help students improve spelling and awareness of spelling patterns;
provide visual cues for students;
encourage increased student independence when reading and writing.
References cont'd:
Headly, K.N. (2008). The international language of vocabulary. International Reading Association's World Congress, Costa Rica. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCkQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Freading.org%2Fdownloads%2FWC_handouts%2FHeadley_Voc.doc&ei=Ms-LU5HcBMOfyASgpIGwAg&usg=AFQjCNH2RaFd4qAb4FDnZB6oHc2G6B2CwQ&sig2=XYUlJuWXlyzY4l98OIS-FQ&bvm=bv.67720277,d.aWw.

Harmon, J. M., & Hedrick, W. B. (2005). Research on vocabulary instruction in content areas: Implications for struggling readers. Reading & Writing Quarterly, 21, 261–280.

Harmon, J. M., Wood, K. D., Hedrick, W. B., Vintinner, J., & Willeford, T. (2009). Interactive word walls: More than just reading and writing on the walls. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 52(5), 398–409.

Herr, N. (n.d.). Dictionaries. & Encyclopedias. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.csun.edu/~vceed002/ref/reference/dictionaries.html

Hoffner, H. (n.d.). Rooting out meaning: morpheme match-ups in the primary grades - ReadWriteThink. readwritethink.org. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/rooting-meaning-morpheme-match-880.html?tab=4#tabs

Hughes, B. (n.d.). Internalization of Vocabulary Through the Use of a Word Map - ReadWriteThink. readwritethink.org. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/internalization-vocabulary-through-word-307.html?tab=4#tabs

Instructional Strategies Online - Word Walls. (2009, January 1).
Instructional Strategies Online - Word Walls.
Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/De/PD/instr/strats/wordwall/index.html

Jackson, J., Tripp, S., & Cox, K. (2011, November). Interactive Word Walls: Transforming Content Vocabulary Instruction. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://learningcenter.nsta.org/files/ss1103_45.pdf

Kieffer, M. J., & Lesaux, N. K. (2007). Breaking down words to build meaning: Morphology, vocabulary, and reading comprehension in the urban classroom.
The Reading Teacher
, 61(2), 134–144.

Larson, L., Dixon, T., & Townsend, D. (2013, May) How can teachers increase classroom use of academic vocabulary?
Voices from the middle,
20, 16 - 21. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.ncte.org/library/nctefiles/resources/journals/vm/0204-may2013/vm0204how.pdf

Lenord, A. (2013, September 22). A lesson on self selected vocabulary. The language coach. Retrieved June, 1 2014, from http://www.amylenord.net/blog/category/selfselected%20vocabularyaaac056217.

Martin, A. M. (2002).
A corner of the universe.
New York: Scholastic.

McLaughlin, K. (n.d.). Using a Word Journal to Create a Personal Dictionary - ReadWriteThink.
readwritethink.org
. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/using-word-journal-create-20.html?tab=3#tabs
5 Internet resources for interactive word walls:
1. NSTA: Interactive word walls

http://learningcenter.nsta.org/files/ss1103_45.pdf

The National Science Teachers Association is a good resource for word walls, providing a rubric on how to create an excellent word wall, as well as offering ideas on creating different types of word walls for a science classroom.

2. 10 Great word wall strategies for classrooms

http://www.k12reader.com/10-great-word-wall-strategies-for-classrooms/

This word wall resource offers great tips and techniques for using different types of word walls. This resource useful site was put together by a middle grades teacher with over ten years of experience in her field.

3. Scholastic: Word walls that work

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/word-walls-work

Ever the teachers best friend, scholastic offers tips from teachers on how to make a useful word wall. This page offers six tips for creating practical and memorable word walls to help students build their vocabulary repertoire.

4. 5 Easy steps to rockin' word walls

http://www.learningunlimitedllc.com/2013/07/5-steps-word-walls/

Kimberly Tyson has a great web page devoted to creating word walls. This site offers a list of tips, pictures, and links to help others build their own word walls.

5. Pinterest: word walls

http://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=word%20walls

Pinterest is quickly becoming the go to resource for crafters and teachers alike, looking for good ideas and quick resources on how to make their classroom a more meaningful environment for their students.
Video directions for the use of word walls:
Video 2. This video gives an outline on how to use word walls, as well as an example of what a word wall can look like. It also explains how a word wall can be taken one step farther when working with graphic organizers. Video reposted from [Khalid Smith]. (2011, September 25). Word wall: secondary edition. [Video file.] Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wovN8Y9KbG.
Figure 3. Example of a vocabulary journal studying prefixes. Reprinted from Larson, L., Dixon, T., & Townsend, D. (May, 2013) How can teachers increase classroom use of academic vocabulary?
Voices from the middle,
20, 16 - 21. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.ncte.org/library/nctefiles/resources/journals/vm/0204-may2013/vm0204how.pdf
Vocabulary journals:
The implementation process of vocabulary journals, as proposed by Antonacci and Callaghan (2012).

1. Introduce vocabulary journals to students.

2. Demonstrate how to select words from a reading.

3. Use think-aloud to model how to contruct meanings from words.

4. Record ideas that have been used to explore the meaning of the word.

5. Encourage students' systematic use and sharing of vocabulary journals

6. Encourage students to use their vocabulary journals as a resource
Supporting research for using vocabulary journals:
Larson, Dixon, and Townsend (2013), found that using vocabulary journals actively engaged students using challenging academic language.

Bone (2000), found that vocabulary journals were a great resource to helping he students explore the meanings of words, making connections between words, and for building knowledge with concept ladders.

Michael Graves (2006), emphasizes teaching building basic vocabulary with students who are ELL. An easy way to do this is through the use of vocabulary journals, which allow students to collect, learn, and use high-frequency words.

5 Internet resources for vocabulary journals:
1. Using a word journal to create a personal dictionary

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/using-word-journal-create-20.html?tab=4#tabs

Kristina McLaughlin offers a useful instructional plan and list of resources for those who are considering using vocabulary journals in their own classrooms.

2. The Science Spot: Interactive science notebook resources

http://sciencespot.net/Pages/ISNinfo.html

As a science teacher, I often find myself at The Science Spot for ideas on lessons and activities. They also have a great list of resources when it comes to creating science vocabulary journals and taking it one step further with interactive notebooks.

3. Science notebooks in k12 classrooms

http://www.sciencenotebooks.org

This resource offers teachers a number of resources for linking science, reading, writing, communication, and mathematics with the use of a journal. .

4. Keeping track of "word of the day" with vocabulary journals

http://www.3rdgradethoughts.com/2013/09/keeping-track-of-word-of-day-with.html#.U4urjhbob-k

This blog is a great resource and motivator for the use of vocabulary journals. The author, Stephanie, gives a great "how to" guide on using vocabulary journals.

5. Pinterest: vocabulary journals

http://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=vocabulary%20journal

Once again pinterest offers a variety of vocabulary journal examples and resources that teachers can use within their own classrooms.
Video directions for the use of vocabulary journals:



Video 3. This is an example of how to teach students to use a vocabulary journal. Video reposted from [1meganorman's channel]. (2011, December 4). Vocabulary journal digial storytelling project. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPgtYHyuVk
Strategy 4: Vocabulary Self-Collection
Introduced before reading and used by students during and after reading
Students identify important words from their reading, record them, and share them with the class
Allows students to manage their own learning
Figure 4. This is an example of a possible outline students could use for self-collection of vocabulary. Copied from Martin, A. M. (2002).
A corner of the universe.
New York: Scholastic.
Vocabulary self-collection:
Antonacci and Callaghan (2012) list 8 steps towards implementing this strategy into a classroom.

1. Teachers introduce the purpose of VSS to students.

2. Teachers model how to select and nominate important words from the readings.

3. Teachers demonstrate how to use context and other resources to learn the meaning of the word.

4. Teachers write the word, the context in which it was used, its meaning and the reason for selecting the word on chart paper.

5. Teachers engage students in the process of vocabulary self-selection.

6. After students are familiar with the strategy, teachers provide guided practice to support th use of VSS during reading.

7. Students in small groups discuss the words they wish to nominate.

8. Students write the two words on a chart similar to the one shown.
Supporting research for using vocabulary self- collection:
Harmon and Hendrick (2005), stated that vocabulary instruction helped struggling readers learn vocabulary using the self-selecting method.

The West Virginia Department of Education promotes the use of vocabulary self-selection as a learning strategy. Furthermore, they state, "this strategy is especially effective with students learning English as a second language, (n.d.)."

Ruddell and Shearer (2002), found that the self-selection of vocabulary "enhances students' motivation and achievement in learning new words."
5 Internet resources for vocabulary self-collection:
1. Choosing, chatting, and collecting: Vocabulary self-selection

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/choosing-chatting-collecting-vocabulary-296.html

Kendra Wagner and Kathleen Benson Quinn put together a great instructional plan and list of resources, helpful to those looking to teach their students the self-selecting strategy.

2. A lesson on self-selected vocabulary

http://www.amylenord.net/blog/category/selfselected%20vocabularyaaac056217

The Language Coach blog offers a great how-to for using the vocabulary self-selection strategy. Including how it went during her own experience using the strategy. She also offers help to other teachers looking to use the method.

3. Vocabulary self-collection strategy plus (VSS+)

http://literacybeat.com/2013/10/23/vocabulary-self-selection-strategy-plus-vss/

Dana Grisham's resource on self-selecting vocabulary demonstrates how use the self-selecting model, then takes it one step further by having students create their own eDictionary.

4. Developing vocabulary through self-selected text

http://www.maine.gov/doe/adulted/admin/curriculum/vocabulary.pdf

The Center for Adult Learning and Literacy at the University of Main offers their example of an curriculum unit based on vocabulary strategies, including the self-selecting strategy.

5. Vocabulary self-collection activity sheet




Kathy Headley at Clemson University offers great samples of worksheets that could be used for a variety of vocabulary instruction strategies, including one I use for vocabulary self-collection.
Palmer, J., Boon, R. T., & Spencer, V. G. (2014). Effects of Concept Mapping Instruction on the Vocabulary Acquisition Skills of Seventh-Graders With Mild Disabilities: A Replication Study.
Reading & Writing Quarterly
, 30(2), 165-182. doi:10.1080/10573569.2013.818890

Pinterest: vocabulary journal. (n.d.). Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=vocabulary%20journal

Pinterest: word wall. (n.d.). Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=word%20walls

Pryde, K. (2012, November 1). Cross-Curricular Word Wall | The Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning.
The Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning
. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://heartandart.ca/?p=1334

Quinn, K. B., & Wagner, K. (n.d.). Choosing, Chatting, and Collecting: Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy. ReadWriteThink.
readwritethink.org
. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/choosing-chatting-collecting-vocabulary-296.html

Ruddell, M.R., & Shearer, B.A. (2002). "Extraordinary," "tremendous," "exhilarating," "magnificent": Middle school at-risk students become avid word learners with the vocabulary self-collection strategy (VSS).
Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy
, 45, 352–363.

Scientific root words, prefixes, and suffixes. (n.d.). Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.biologyjunction.com/prefixes%20and%20suffixes.pdf

Search for synonyms using the Visual Thesaurus. (n.d.). Thinkmap Visual Thesaurus. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://www.visualthesaurus.com

Tomm, T., & McDaniel, C. (April, 2013). The Science Spot: Interactive Science Notebooks.
The Science Spot: Interactive Science Notebooks
. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://sciencespot.net/Pages/ISNinfo.html

Tyson, K. (2013, July 8). {5 Steps Series} 5 Easy Steps to Rockin' Word Walls | Learning Unlimited | Research-based Literacy Strategies. Dr Kimberlys Literacy Blog. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.learningunlimitedllc.com/2013/07/5-steps-word-walls/

Visuwords™ online • Visual Dictionary, Visual Thesaurus. (n.d.). Visuwords™ online • Visual Dictionary, Visual Thesaurus. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://www.visuwords.com

Vocabulary. (n.d.). Merriam-Webster. Retrieved May 30, 2014, from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vocabulary

Vocabulary Self-Selection Strategy. (n.d.).
Vocabulary Self-Selection Strategy
. West Virginia Department of Education. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://wvde.state.wv.us/strategybank/VocabularySelf-SelectionStrategy.html

Wagstaff, J. (n.d.). Word Walls That Work | Scholastic.com.
Scholastic Teachers
. Retrieved June 1, 2014, from http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/word-walls-work

White, T.G., Sowell, J., & Yanagihara, A. (1989). Teaching elementary students to use word part clues.
The Reading Teacher
, 42, 302–308

Word Maps. (n.d.).
Reading Rockets.
Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/word_maps

Wordle - Beautiful Word Clouds. (n.d.).
Wordle - Beautiful Word Clouds
. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://www.wordle.net

{1meganorman's channel]. (2011, December 4). Vocabulary journal digial storytelling project. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPgtYHyuVk
References cont'd

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CEMQFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Freading.org%2Fdownloads%2FWC_handouts%2FHeadley_Voc.doc&ei=9MuLU8LNGJCOyASQzYGIBw&usg=AFQjCNH2RaFd4qAb4FDnZB6oHc2G6B2CwQ&sig2=-E69CZFDzgIgIz3yWK8bBQ&bvm=bv.67720277,d.aWw
Watch the full video here:
https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/strategy-to-build-student-vocabulary
Video of vocabulary self-collection in the classroom:
Video 4. Is an example of how one teacher uses vocabulary self-collection to teach vocabulary in a a science classroom. Video reposted from Building Science Vocabulary. (n.d.). Teaching Channel. Retrieved June 2, 2014, from https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/strategy-to-build-student-vocabulary
Strategy 5: Word Mapping
Using visual displays, students depict relationships between words
Students examine characteristics of word concepts and categorize word
Figure 5. This is an example of a word map that stemming from the word "biology." Related words can be found around it to better understand what the word biology entails. Reprinted from Biology project. (n.d.). The University of Arizona . Retrieved June 2, 2014, from http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/biology/biocon.html
Word mapping:
7 steps to implementing word mapping in the classroom, (Antonacci and Callaghan, 2012).

1. Select words for vocabulary instruction.

2. Project a blank word map on the screen.

3. Write the key words on the word map.

4. Use a think-aloud to model how to explore relationships between words.

5. Record ideas that have been used to explore the word meanings and relationships.

6. Students are directed to use the word maps during and afer reading to add information about the key words.

7. Students share their maps with others
Supporting research for word mapping:
Graves (2008), found that word mapping was one of the best ways to teach vocabulary because it engaged students by requiring them to think of word relationships.

Boone, Palmer, and Spencer (2014), found that word mapping models showed higher improvements over vocabulary learning then the dictionary approach for students with reading disabilities.
5 Internet resources for word mapping:
1. Internalization of vocabulary through the use of a a word map

http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/internalization-vocabulary-through-word-307.html?tab=4#tabs

Betsy Hughes has created a great internet resource for using word maps to help teach vocabulary.

2. Visuwords: Online graphical dictionary

http://www.visuwords.com

Visuwords has a great interactive online tool for making word maps.

3. Visual thesaurus

http://www.visualthesaurus.com/trialover/

This digital word map is an interactive dictionary ad thesaurus that allows you to discover the connection between words.

4. Wordle word clouds

http://www.wordle.net

Wordle is an exciting new word mapping format that creates a digital word cloud. Using the word mapping technique, anyone can create a cool and colorful word cloud.

5. Word maps

http://www.readingrockets.org/strategies/word_maps

Reading Rockets has a simple page put together on how to use word maps as well as some simple word map templates.
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Video of word mapping in the classroom:
Video 5. This video is just one example of using word maps within a classroom setting. Though this video is for a social studies curriculum it can easily be adapted to any other content area. Video reposted from Caramagno, S. [Sophia Caramagno]. (2012, August 29). Vocabulary word map lesson. [Video file]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipqmdH-LxU.
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