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"How Odysseus changes in the Odyssey"

Odysseus
by

Charlene Huyler

on 17 May 2011

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Transcript of "How Odysseus changes in the Odyssey"

Introductory Odysseus:
brave and heroic man
admired by many
through his love of glory, Poseidon became his enemy
changed for the better during his long journey home Initial Character Resulting Character Forces of Change Conclusion impulsive 'How Odysseus changes in the Odyssey' By: Charlene Huyler Impulsive Prideful Reckless patient Patient Humble Cautious " But I would not listen to them, and shouted out to him in my rage, 'cyclops, if anyone asks you who it was that put your eye out and spoiled your beauty, say it was the valiant warrior Odysseus son of Laertes, who lives in Ithaca. " ( homer 115 ) prideful rash cautious humble " What manner of men would you be to stand by Odysseus, if some god should bring him back here all of a sudden? say which you are disposed to do-side with the suitors, or with Odysseus?"" ( 265 ) " Odysseus clad in rags and leaning on a staff as though he were some miserable old beggar. " ( 297 ) " He endured being struck and insulted without a word, " ( 297 ) " How come you are so lamentably less valiant now that you are on your own ground, face to face with the suitors in your own house? " ( 276 ) ( Odysseus didnt immediately kill all the suitors, he held back a bit at first. ) ( Odysseus tested his old servant whether or not he was still loyal. ) Calypso's Island had a major affect on Odysseus
he spent 7 whole years on that Island
he had a lot of time to think about what he had and what he could've done
when Odysseus faced the wrath of Poseidon, he realized why it was importnat to sometimes swallow your pride and not boast Odysseus has overcome many obstacles in his long journey. He has changed for the better. At first he was rash and impulsive. He was very full of himself. The changing point for Odysseus was Calypso's Island. By the end of the story, he was more humble, patient and thought things through before rushing in head on. " But I would not listen to them, and shouted out in my rage, " ( 115 ) " we got so close in that we could see the stubblefires burning, and I, being then dead beat, fell into a light sleep, for I had never let the rudder out of my hands, that we might get home the faster. " ( 118 ) ( Odysseus fell asleep when he knew that his crew was disobeying. ) ( Odysseus just shouted out whatever he wanted to, without even thinking first. ) " There I sacked the town and put the people to the sword. We took their wives and also much booty " ( Odysseus wanted to let Polyphemus know who beasted him out of pride. ) ( Odysseus boasts on his achievement. ) " Odysseus stood firm as a rock and the blow did not even stagger him, but he shook his head in silence as he brooded his revenge. " ( 220 ) ( Odysseus didn't strike back, when the suitors disrespected him. He controlled himself. ) " Who and whence are you ... And Odysseus answered: "It would be a long story madam, were I to relate in full the tale of my misfortune ... " ( Odysseus doesn't want to reveal himself right away, like he did when he blinded Polyphemus. ) Works Cited ( Odysseus thinks he doesn't need the gods. ) "For a moment he doubted whether or not to fly at Melanthius and kill hime with his staff, or fling him to the ground and beat his brains out. He resolved, however, to endure it and keep himself in check." (215) Homer. The Odyssey. Trans. Samuel Butler. New York, N.Y.: Amsco School Publications, Inc., 1988. Print. ( Poseidon wants Odysseus to change his ways, and therefore punishes him. ) " While he was thus in two minds, Poseidon sent a terrible great wave that seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over the raft, which then went to peices.." ( Homer, 66 )
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