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Conjunction

SGDL 1012
by

Ayden Coetzee

on 26 July 2013

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Transcript of Conjunction

How to teach sentence functions (Suggested Activities)
Conjunctions
What are conjunctions?
A conjunction is a word which is used to link or join words, phrases, or clauses.
In simple English:
A conjunction is like
glue
. It helps things to
stick
together.
How to remember coordinating conjunctions:
F
or - used to show a relationship between things
A
nd - connects things that are alike or joined together
N
or - used to offer a negative choice
B
ut - used to connect things that are different or separated
O
r - used to offer a choice
Y
et - used to show a change
S
o - used to show a relationship between things
Three
Types of Conjunctions
Coordinating Conjunctions
Connect words, phrases and clauses of
equal
value
e.g.
Sharon
and
Jessica
went to school.
Victoria can sing
or
play the guitar
.
Priscilla's car

is good
but
Ken's bicycle

is better
.
Subordinating Conjunctions
How to remember subordinating conjunctions:
B U D I S W I S E
Before Unless Despite In order that Since While If Since Even though
B U T H O T
Because Until That How Once Than
A A A
After Although (though) As
W W W
Whether When (Whenever) Where (Wherever)
We can use a combination of approaches to teach sentence functions
Activity 1
Students are given a text or book . Students find examples of sentence functions from text and write in a post it

Declarative statements - Blue
Exclamatory statements - Pink
Interrogative statents - Yellow
Connect ideas of
unequal
value e.g. independent clause with dependent clause
Approach - CLT, Discovery
A comma is used to lessen the importance of the first clause e.g.
When Josh woke up,
Abel jumped on him.
If no comma is used, the second clause is subordinate e.g. Abel jumped on Josh
when he woke up.
Why? Student can see the patterns in writing
Activity 2
Approach - Grammar translation,CLT, Audio-lingual
1. Silent way
2. Grammar translation method
3. Communicative Language Teaching
4. Total physical response
5. Audio-lingual method - dialogue
Activity 3
Students learn inflections when reading the different sentence functions.

Teacher reads sentences and students punctuate the sentences.
Why? Student familiarize themselves in spoken and written English
Approach - CLT, Audio-lingual etc.
Class is divided into 3 groups: Declarative, Interrogative, Exclamatory. 1 student from each group will role play a situation given by students.

Students later can write the
conversation.
Why? Students can practice speaking and know how to use them in real-life situation.
Sentence Types
The structure of a sentence refers to the types of parts in the sentence as well as the way(s) these parts are put together
Simple sentences
Compound sentences
Complex sentences
Correlating Conjunctions
Connect two
balanced
words, phrases, or clauses
e.g.
Neither
John
nor
Joel have a girlfriend.
Such
is Goerge's charm
that
many fall at her feet.
Not only
is Joanne intelligent,
but
she is
also
beautiful.
How to remember correlating conjunctions:
both-and from-to whether-or
A

B C D E F G
as-as such-that not-but neither-nor
H I J K L M N O P
not only - but also
Q R S T U V
as many-as

W X
just as-so

Y & Z
either-or as-so so-that
Now I know my A, B, C’s
if - then such - as between-and
Next time won’t you sing with me?
Simple Sentence
A car has one engine. It can move.
One independent clause
Susan had a cat.
COMPOUND SENTENCES
A compound sentence consists of two or more independent clauses.
These clauses are connected either with a semi-colon or with a comma and coordinating conjunction.

Question Time :
What are coordinating conjunctions?
Toby wanted to become a doctor; he applied to medical
school.

Toby wanted to become a doctor, so he applied to
medical school.
and
Two independent clauses joined by a connective.
Susan had a cat
and
it was black.
A complex sentence consists of one independent clause connected to one or more dependent clauses.

Independent Clause - An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence. Here is an example: We walk to school. This sentence shows a complete thought and can stand alone.

Dependent Clause - A dependent clause cannot stand alone as a sentence. Here is an example: when the cake is done baking This clause does not express a complete thought and cannot stand alone.
COMPLEX SENTENCES
A trailer has no engine. It cannot move on its own. It needs the car for it to move.
A car has an engine. It can move
One subordinate clause
One independent clause.
One independent clause joined by a connective to a
subordinate clause.
Susan has had a cat
since
she was young.
SIMPLE SENTENCES
A simple sentence consists of a single independent clause.

Question time :
1) Joe drove.
2) Joe drove her car from Cape Town to Knysna
3) Joe drove her 13-year-old, rusty Toyota from Cape Town to Knysna on a rainy July day.
Revision
Special thanks
Neoh Joon Kee
S. Ranjeetha Siwajanam
Ashiah Zainot Rahim

http://www.myschoolhouse.com/courses/O/1/56.asp
Two cars have two engines . They both drive
Full transcript