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Figurative Language

Examples mostly from Romeo and Juliet
by

Kelly Wendt

on 3 December 2014

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Transcript of Figurative Language

Figurative Language:
Why do we use
figurative language?
Simile:
Metaphor:
Imagery:
Personification:
Repetition/Refrain:
Rhyme:
We use figurative language to describe something by comparing it with something else.
USES THE WORDS "LIKE" OR "AS" TO COMPARE ONE OBJECT OR IDEA WITH ANOTHER TO SUGGEST THEY ARE ALIKE
STATES A FACT OR DRAWS A VERBAL PICTURE BY THE USE OF COMPARISON.
A FIGURE OF SPEECH IN WHICH HUMAN CHARACTERISTICS ARE GIVEN TO AN ANIMAL OR OBJECT
THE USE OF VIVID LANGUAGE AND DESCRIPTIVE LANGUAGE TO ADD DEPTH TO WRITING, ALLOWING THE READER TO SEE WHAT YOU WANT TO TELL THEM
REPETITION:
IDENTITY OR CLOSE SIMILARITY OF SOUND BETWEEN ACCENTED SYLLABLES
the use of words or phrases in a manner
where the literal meaning of the words is not true or does not make sense,
but "implies a non-literal meaning which does make sense or that could be true"

Example:
"This precious book of love, this unbound lover, To beautify him, only lacks a cover"
In this quote, Lady Capulet explains to Juliet that Paris would make a worth husband because he is a "precious book of love", and that he is only missing a cover (Juliet would be the "cover").
Examples:
Scaring the ladies like a crow-keeper
Too rude, too boisterous; and it pricks like thorn
He bears him like a portly gentleman;
Like a poor prisoner in his twisted gyves
Remember: A simile says you are LIKE something; a metaphor is more positive, it says you ARE something.
Example:
Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek
Example:
There are plenty of fish in the sea.
Example:
"Death is my son-in-law, Death is my heir,
My daughter he hath wedded."
Example:
The stars danced playfully in the moonlit sky.
Example:
"What light through yonder window breaks? It is the east and Juliet is the sun."
Example:
"My lips, two blushing pilgrims stand"
a unifying property of repeated words, sounds, syllables, and other elements that appear in a work
REFRAIN:
a word, phrase, line, or group of lines that is repeated for effect several times in a poem
Example:
Juliet- "O Romeo, Romeo! wherefore art thou Romeo?" (II.II.33)
Example:
I am so, so, so, excited for summer!
Two households, both alike in dignity,
in fair Verona where we lay our
SCENE
From ancient grudge break to new mutiny
where civil blood makes civil hands
UNCLEAN
From forth the fatal loins of these two foes
a pair of star-crossed lovers take their
LIFE
Whose misadventured piteous o'erthrow
do with their deaths bury their parents'
STRIFE
Example:
Example:
Benvolio: Hence, be gone away!
Romeo: O, I am fortune's fool!
Benvolio: Why dost thou stay?
(3.1.134-135)
Full transcript