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Jesus, an Upstander, and Me!

GSGC Spring Final
by

Chi Ho

on 10 May 2010

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Transcript of Jesus, an Upstander, and Me!

A Poofy Named Kiki Quynh-Chi
GSGC Garcia
Block 7 There once was a poofy named Kiki. Kiki was as cheerful and as talkative as any other kid-poofy. The only way in which she stood out was her bright red hair, which she thought made her special. At school, despite standing out amongst her dark-blue-haired classmates, her peers accepted her. Within the first few days of school, she became good friends with Mandi and Lauri. Kiki thought herself to have formed strong bonds with the people she thought to be her friends. However, this all changed one day when the new kid-poofy on the block arrived at her school. The first thing this new kid, Sid, commented about is Kiki’s bright red hair. He teased her for a long while during which Mandi and Lauri did not utter a word. Sid pointed out that on all the posters around school, all the poofies have dark blue hair. He then called upon Mandi to approach him and asked her if she thought Kiki’s bright red hair to be hideous. After a moment’s hesitation, Mandi blurted out “Yes,” adding some additional vicious comments. Sid then called upon Lauri to comment on Kiki’s hair, but she did not utter a word, and instead cried and ran away. Social messages can affect our way of thinking for better or for worse (Social Messages, 4/22/09). Social messages are messages conveyed through the media, such as the poster Sid pointed out. They can have a positive effect if the messages’ goal isn’t to cut people apart, but rather to encourage them to embrace themselves and others. One such message would be a poster that promoted diversity, explaining that it is okay to be different. In this story, Kiki has taken a turn for the worse. During the next week, Kiki became very quiet and reserved. She kept to herself and sat alone at lunch. She gradually began to believe that she needed to fit the image of a “perfect” kid-poofy. She began to feel shame. Social messages can affect our way of thinking for better or for worse Kiki’s best friend, Cici, reminded her to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy social messages. reminded her to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy social messages. Kiki still felt ashamed of her hair, and everyday she increasingly sank into depression. Shame was destroying her self-esteem, thus rendering her incapable of grasping reality. She felt the need to belong in a group, but she felt didn’t belong anywhere: she felt like a loner. One day, her friend, Andi, passed by her. He saw that there was something wrong, so he asked her, and she explained everything to him. He then told her that he understood what she was going through for he had also been a victim of teasing, but he began to explain to her that by feeling shame, she gave more power to Sid. He continued on to say that if she wanted to make a difference and speak up against Sid, she must first get past feeling shame. Shame is highly destructive and makes us feel worthless (Guilt/Shame, 3/2/09). Shame does not aid us to ameliorate the situation. Shame is highly destructive and makes us feel worthless Shame does not aid us to ameliorate the situation. Kiki began to take comfort in what Andi told her. She began to understand, and she began to speak out. Once she regained most of her confidence, she witnessed something. Across the field, she saw a group of kid-poofies pointing and laughing at Sid. When she came up to see what they were laughing about, she found that they were teasing him about his failed math test. “You are a yellow poofy with dark blue hair! You should be smart!” At this, Sid burst into tears. Kiki came up to the group that was teasing Sid and said, “You should not tease Sid just because he does not fit a particular stereotype. Social messages are not all true, and they can be harmful. Instead, we should all join together and spread the Reign of God by speaking out for those who do not have, or have not found their voice…be upstanders! The Reign of God is not a place, but it is a time, it is here and now (Reign of God, 10/3/08)! We need to remember to maintain unconditional love for everyone, regardless of any social message.” The Reign of God is not a place, but it is a time, it is here and now remember to maintain unconditional love for everyone As everyone began to clap, Sid stopped crying and thanked Kiki for standing-up for him. He apologized and promised to never mock anyone ever again, especially simply because he/she did not fit a particular social stereotype. Kiki accepted his apology. Kiki thanked Andi for helping her realize that by feeling shame, she was not helping herself, nor was she helping anyone else. Lauri then came running to Kiki. She apologized for not standing up for Kiki, and she explained that she was too scared take either side. She felt just as bad about not saying anything, as she would have felt if she had joined in on the teasing. Not standing up for Kiki made her a bystander. Kiki told Lauri to not feel shame towards what she had done, but rather guilt, so that next time she found herself in a similar situation, she would act differently. Kiki was her cheerful self once again. They all lived happily ever after!
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