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The Sleepe Framework ( Project )

Project - Stanford University
by

Sara Rodríguez Arias

on 26 March 2013

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Transcript of The Sleepe Framework ( Project )

THE SLEEPE FRAMEWORK WHAT IS SLEEPE Sleepe is an original & educational method SLEEPE IS... MULTILINGUAL! Students from kindergarten onwards study French, and Spanish thanks to: Sara Rodríguez Arias The same contents for children in both languages. Children between 3 til 10 years onwards, though Sara will focus mainly in these ages because there is lot of material to develop. dynamic and enjoyable classes guaranteed! KEY LEARNING AREAS IN FRENCH AND SPANISH FOR STAN AND STELLA & MARTHA AND PETER AGE 3 - STORYTELLING.
- CALIGRAPHY.
- READING.
- LEARNING THE NUMBERS.
- CUT AND PASTE ACTIVITIES. ABECEDARY.
- THE DAYS OF THE WEEK & MONTHS.
- WRITING THEIR NAMES. AGE 4 - CALIGRAPHY.
- READING.
- DEVELOP.
- NUMBERS.
- PAINTING.
-LEARNING VOCABULARY.
-DEVELOP CREATIVITY. THROUGH GAMES. AGE 5
LEARNING THE ANIMALS
LEARNING THE NAME OF FRUITS
LEARNING THE MONTHS
LEARNING TO PRESENT THEMSELVES IN BOTH LANGUAGES
LEARNING SIMPLE SENTENCES AGE 6 LEARNING THE PARTS OF A HOUSE
LEARNING THE NAME OF THE COUNTRIES
LEARNING PRESENT SIMPLE
LEARNING THE MAIN VERBS
TESTING WHAT THEY HEAR THANKS TO AUDIOFILES AGE 7 THE PAST SIMPLE
THE VERB TO BE /LE VERBE ÊTRE, AVOIR ET FAIRE CREATING SENTENCES WRITE STORYTELLING LEARNING MATERIAL THAT IS USED AT SCHOOL AUDIOFILES PRACTICE CONVERSATIONS AGE 8 AUDIOFILES
PRACTISING CONVERSATIONS WITH STUDENTS LEARNING THE COLOURS LEARNING CLOTHES LEARNING FOOD READING AGE 9 / AGE 10 READING COTIDIAN CONVERSATIONS AUDIOFILES THE WEATHER FORECAST THE PRESENT SIMPLE, PAST SIMPLE, VERB TO BE, THE PAST IN ALL ITS FORMS, AND CONDITIONAL LEARNING PROFESSIONS START TO WRITE COMPLEX SENTENCES FILMS- VIDEOS SPEAKING KEY AREAS IN FRENCH AND SPANISH: Thanks to Spanish and French, Sara is going to develop with Stan and Stella, Martha and Peter the following competences.... LANGUAGE COMPETENCE VOCABULARY LOGIC COMPETENCE CONVERSATIONS IN CLASS VISIO- SPATIAL COMPETENCE ACTIVITIES OF CUTTING AND PASTE, AND GAMES GRAMMATICAL COMPETENCE VERBS IN ALL ITS TENSES, CREATING PHRASES, AND COMPOSITIONS, ANALYZING EVERY PART OF A SENTENCE MOTOR- COORDINATION SPEAKING IN BOTH LANGUAGES IN ORDER TO RELATE SOME WORDS WHICH ARE SIMILAR IN BOTH LANGUAGES ANALYSING/ CRITICAL SKILLS CONVERSATIONS
DISCUSSIONS AND DEBATES IN CLASS COMPHRENSION &UNDERSTANDING READING AND AUDIOFILES CULTURAL KNOWLEDGE OF BOTH COUNTRIES MAPS, GEOGRAPHICAL AREAS, AND COUNTRIES COUNTRIES MAPS QUESTIONS TO ASSESS COMPETENCE IN THE LEARNING AREAS FOR EACH GRADE IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO ASSESS QUESTIONS IN ORDER TO SEE IF CHILDREN ARE LEARNING THE MOST IMPORTANT TOPICS IN BOTH LANGUAGES: FRENCH AND SPANISH AGE 3 & 4 AGE 5 AGE 6 AGE 7 AGE 8 AGE 9 AGE 10 -Crossword puzzle -Songs - Painting pictures and reading what is below the picture in English. Associate the picture with the word itself so that it can be easy. - Storytelling for children,in their language, and including some words in the language they are learning FRENCH & SPANISH - PLAYING SCRABBLE SO THAT IT CAN BE EASY TO CREATE NEW WORDS, AND LEARN NEW ONES - PLAYING THE HANGMAN IN BLACKBOARD - CREATE STORYTELLING THANKS TO COMIC PUPPETS, AND PLUSH -INTERACTING WITH NEW TECHNOLOGIES: GAMES IN COMPUTER IN ORDER TO LEARN THIS NEW LANGUAGE. ESPECIALLY FOR GRAMMAR, BECAUSE IT IS A LITTLE BORING - ACTIVITIES OF FILLING IN SPACE -ACTIVITIES OF TRUE OR FALSE? - ACTIVITIES WHERE YOU HAVE A PICTURE AND YOU SHOULD KNOW WHAT THAT PICTURE IS, AND TRY TO DESCRIBE IT -ACTIVITIES OF YES/NO QUESTIONS EXERCISES OF GRAMMAR IN COMPUTER, AND CLASS THANKS TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF COMPOSITIONS OF SIMPLE/ COMPLEX SENTENCES A DEEP ANALYSIS TO STORYTELLING WHERE I BEGIN A SENTENCE, AND STUDENTS GOES ON WITH THE STORY. (EVERY STUDENT SHOULD BUILD A SENTENCE OR TWO) THEN WE WILL READ A FUNNY STORY WRITTEN BY ALL OF US. - FORUM DEBATE IN COMPUTER ABOUT DIFFERENT ISSUES EVERY WEEK - LEARNING A LANGUAGE IN A CHAT. CHATTING IS A GOOD TOOL IN ORDER TO LEARN NEW LANGUAGES - LISTENING TO BBC NEWS,OR AN OTHER KIND OF NEW SO THAT THEY CAN KNOW A LITTLE MORE OF WHAT HAPPENS IN THE REAL WORLD - VIDEO CONFERENCE THANKS TO SKYPE OR AN OTHER KIND OF PLATFORM WHICH ALLOWS TO MAKE A MEET- UP FACE- TO-FACE SO THAT YOU CAN HAVE NEW FRIENDS, AND DEVELOP YOUR CULTURAL BACKGROUND AS WELL AS INTEREST FOR LANGUAGES - SPEAKING IN CLASS, EVERY WEEK A SPECIAL TOPIC WE HAVE DEALT WITH. TRYING TO USE THE VOCABULARY LEARNT THAT SPECIFIC WEEK -COMPOSITIONS FROM JOURNALS, ARTICLES, OR A STORY -HAVING A JOURNAL WITH THEM SO THEY CAN WRITE IN THAT LANGUAGE WHATEVER THEY LIKE -LISTENING AUDIOFILES: MUSIC, STORIES, NEWS - RECORDING THEMSELVES, THEIR VOICE WHEN SPEAKING A LANGUAGE SO THAT THEY CAN CHECK THEIR PRONUNCIATION -WATCHING VIDEO FILES RELATED TO THE ISSUES WE ARE SEEING IN CLASS.FOR EXAMPLE, IF WE ARE DEALING WITH ANIMALS, BRING A DOCUMENTARY THAT HAD THOSE SPECIFIC ANIMALS - CREATING STORIES USING THE VOCABULARY OF THE WEEK SO THAT THEY CAN LEARN THE SPECIFIC VOCABULARY - TRY TO ASSOCIATE THE VOCABULARY IN BOTH LANGUAGES, SIMILAR VOCABULARY SO THAT THEY CAN LEARN MORE WORDS IN LESS TIME USING WHATSUPP IN THEIR DAILY LIVES FOR PRACTISING WITH THEIR FRIENDS IN ENGLISH OR LANGUAGE SLEEPE IS ... PERSONALIZED FOR STAN /STELLA, MARHA & PETER! The SLEEPE Framework is a new approach to purposeful education that places students at the center of the Education ecosystem and constantly re-aligns itself around their interests, aspirations and aptitude. The goal of the framework is to help children become global experts in their professions, and happy citizens driving noble social prosperity.



For understandable historical reasons, students have had to adapt to the learning environments, but today's connected world opens up several possibilities to flip the arrangement. The 'gift' of the 'present'


Recent advances in affordable technologies now make it possible to connect the key stakeholders of the child's success in life and profession. Lifting them out of their silos, SLEEPE enables Parents, Teachers, Employers, Education Experts to help students maximize the returns of their time, energy and monetary investment in education. Retaining the good, discarding the bad, re-engineering the ugly


SLEEPE is a blended framework that uses both offline and online processes for effective and efficient learning filled with learnable moments for the children. It is designed ground up to be continuously relevant and sustainable.

A proof-of-concept of the idea has been operational at www.gloschol.com, and SLEEPE seeks to enhance its reach to global levels leveraging low cost technologies IF YOU WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT SLEEPE CONTINUE CLICKING! Design goal #1: Self-sustain from the beginning, build to last.


The real world implementation of SLEEPE is planned as an economically sustainable organization that leverages experts around the globe. Funding for the initiative will be through small, low-risk, private investments of select education enthusiasts drawn from the pool of interested parents, education experts and others who believe in the idea.



A healthy, non-greedy, revenue goal is emphasized to ensure decent returns to inspire funding for other sustainable causes and so that the organization can support several under-served educational needs without having to rely on outside charity or donations. Grounds for implementation

The following institutions and individuals have graciously agreed to be sandboxes to validate scenarios for the real-world implementation of SLEEPE:

•Indian Public School, Bangalore Rural District


•Indian Academy College, Bangalore Urban District


•A great Teacher Trainer, reputed school, upmarket Mumbai

We are in the process of partnering with a very large NGO to validate the viability of SLEEPE for the economically and socially under-served student communities. VIDEO ANIMATION ABOUT SLEEPE PROJECT DELIVERABLES


Tina interface - 1: How SLEEPE enables Stella and Stan in India become better in French and espanol through Sarah in Spain Stan-Stella + Martha-Peter interface: Curriculum framework for children - French / Spanish
Final deliverable video Animation video
Schema
The creation of this final Prezi (Pictures....) Project Deliverables:
- From Kindergarten (age 3) onwards, list key learning areas in French / Spanish for each year until grade 10.
- Create sample questions to assess competence in the learning areas for each grade JYOTHI Stan-Stella + Martha-Peter interface: Curriculum framework for children - English
Tina interface - 2: Measuring teacher effectiveness and creating teacher audit report Project Deliverables:
- From Kindergarten (age 3) onwards, list key learning areas in English for each year until grade 10.
- Create sample questions to assess competence in the learning areas for each grade
- Sample audit templates and reports to measure teacher effectiveness

Stan-Stella + Martha-Peter interface: Curriculum framework for children - Science



Project Deliverables:
- From Kindergarten (age 3) onwards, list key learning areas in Science for each year until grade 10.
- Create sample questions to assess competence in the learning areas for each grade
- - Best practices for teaching Science in a more effective and fun way through SLEEPE HEMA


Stan-Stella + Martha-Peter interface: Curriculum framework for children - Math



Project Deliverables:
- From Kindergarten (age 3) onwards, list key learning areas in Science for each year until grade 10.
- Create sample questions to assess competence in the learning areas for each grade
- Best practices for teaching Math in a more effective and fun way through SLEEPE RUCHI


Professional Development Module



Project Deliverables:
- Evaluation Questionnaires for assessing the following: Communication Skills, Team Work, Conflict Resolution, Decision Making, Time Management, Leadership, Project Management.
- Sample reports and gap analysis
- Resources (SLEEPE / External) to help students improve in the professional skills. ALL GROUP DELIVERABLE. SARA RODRÍGUEZ SLEEPE Architecture: The open architecture presentation of the SLEEPE Learning Environment
Economic Sustainablity Model: How learning environments built using the SLEEPE Framework can self-sustain
External validations, best practices and lessons learned: Summary document
Technology platform: Mock up of a learning environment powered by SLEEPE .
Creation of the SLEEPE Logo: a dancer (t features a student dancing (gracefully, enjoying, stress-less,...) Sudarshan said: "towards happiness in profession and life. Like ripples in still water, the SLEEPE Framework centers itself around each new step of the student and connects the steps to other parts of the education ecosystem". SUDARSHAN External Consultant / New Member (Ananth's deliverables)


-Emily Interface: How SLEEPE interfaces with Employer as stakeholder of the learning environment.
- Emily will have the ability to select her human resource requirements through SLEEPE •Students can see all the opportunities and the corresponding skill requirements. They can choose courses through SLEEPE to build specific competencies. •Educational institutions or certifying agencies can evaluate students against the required competencies and issue graded certificates •Emily can select candidates that best fit her needs Project Deliverables:
- Comprehensive list of employment sectors (Automobile, Healthcare, Banking, etc.)
- Take 1 or 2 high demand sectors and name personnel roles in them
- Evaluation scenario of students fitting into requirements of Emily SARAH
RADOSEVICH ECONOMIC SUSTANAINABILITY OF THE SLEEPE FRAMEWORK Sustainability is a very important design specification of the project. It is the only way to ensure that this idea will be alive and healthy for a loooong time, without having to constantly solicit donations or funds. This thread will describe different ways of how sustainability will be built into the project. For instance, there is a part of the framework that leverages experts. It is the Global Education Hub. As an example, Sara's expertise in Spanish can be leveraged to benefit students, and at the same time generate her some income. It won't be writing a book, but the effort will be approximately that of writing a 300-page book. The templates for this will be provided by the framework. Similarly, experts in other subjects can plugin their expertise. But no "free" work. The Hub WILL send them income, but if they don't want to keep it, they can donate it to any cause of their choice. Anybody with expertise in any field which is relevant to specific predefined learning NEEDS can leverage the Hub this way. As a proof of concept, the Hub will be implemented with a few such learning areas. The idea is that when there is good flow of income, more experts will be motivated to contribute their expertise for a longer time and with commitment. With a "free" service, I have seen that it doesn't sustain for long. It was a real lesson learned in my learning lab. One of the goals is to help teachers as a token of gratitude for being in the noble profession and helping students become even more prosperous than themselves. Some class teachers from primary school are already part of GLASS. It works very well. The SLEEPE Framework will take it to global scales. There will be other ways for generating revenue to ensure economic sustainability of the initiative. Every component of the framework will have economic sustainability as a design principle. One of the purposes for education is to help children stand on their own feet and be happy and prosperous when they are older. For that to happen, even the learning environment should be able to stand on its feet and be prosperous and happy. Economic sustainability will also inspire other Edupreneurs to invest in the idea if they like it, and reap dividends that can help them fund other initiatives. It will ensure a happy win-win for all those involved. The organizational model eventually supported by The SLEEPE Framework will be "hybrid". Economic sustainability will be a key goal in the real-world implementation of this project. The SLEEPE Framework will be used to create several products and offerings by experts around the globe, and each of these will be viable. The challenge for the organization will be to constantly monitor the pulse of the community needs and roll out offerings that are high value for money. The organization will also be a channel for activities of genuine social responsibility. Proceeds from the offerings will be used to support such activities, instead of relying on the philanthropy of donors. The economic sustainability goal will be realized by structuring a lean, cost-conscious and nature-friendly organization. The organization will adapt itself well to the changing needs of the community, by responding to the demand through a range of relevant offerings. FEATURES OF OUR PROJECT This is a project around Purposeful Education. Purposeful Education means viewing Education not as a herd instinct to follow in an entrenched system, but approaching it with specific purpose aligned with specific goals. There are no well-known tools currently available to assist with this. SLEEPE is a fun, global effort by education-enthusiasts to demonstrate a comprehensive platform for enabling purposeful education by interconnecting constituents, species and eco-systems. SLEEPE stands for Smart Learning Environment Enabling Purposeful Education. Each part of the acronym is significant. Its real world implementation will be self-sustaining, supported by different stakeholders who see value for money in the offerings. The economic sustainability will also help fund initiatives to include students who are unable to participate in the education system. The key constituents in the learning environment relevant to this project are students (Stella and Stan), parents (Martha and Peter), employers (Emily), education experts (Tina) and leaders of education institutions (Collin). The SLEEPE Framework is centered around the student. Today's reality is that the different constituents operate in different silos, concerned primarily about the ecosystem or species they represent. The most important stakeholder in the education process - the student - is ignored and left behind in the process. As we get into the Design, we will encounter components (such as Futuris.2c, Global Education Hub, Smart Competence Engine, etc.) each of which will need needs analysis of its own. There are other great DNLE projects that complement our effort. The architecture of The SLEEPE Framework will facilitate symbiotic plug-in of compatible project ideas. The SLEEPE Framework will evolve beyond its academic scope and be a real-world solution for the challenges it addresses. Team members are welcome to join hands and participate in that effort, part time or full time, if they are interested. Even others who see the relevance of this idea are welcome to join this effort after reviewing the final presentation.

Please note that economic self-sustainability is a major goal. The framework will be used to create innovative, first-of-their-kind offerings that will deliver high value for money to the users. The proceeds will be used to fund further enhancements to the idea and also support its social causes. What happens after the project? pinterest.com STATISTICS / INTERESTING INFORMATION Source : pinterest.com EDUCATIONAL GAMES SOURCE: pinterest.com ---> You can click the image and move it with your mouse in order to see the all image in a more detailed way. ---> You can click the image and move it with your mouse in order to see the all image in a more detailed way. Apart from Spanish and French, students will also learn Maths: THANKS TO RUCHI! FACTOR THAT PLAY ROLE IN BASIC MATH LEARNING 1) Sequencing
a) Number series
b) Word problems

2) Motor Co-ordination
a) Fine motor
b) Gross motor

3) Perception
a)Figure-ground
b)Form constancy
c)Right- left discrimination
d)Visio-Spatial
e)Shape size discrimination 4)Attention
a)Sustained
b)Alternating 5)Memory
a)Short term
b)Long term
c)Working memory 6)Language
a)Verbal
b)Symbol
c)Relation HOW TO OVERCOME THE DIFFICULTIES FACED BY STUDENTS IN MATHS?
Problem 1:
a)Weaker short term memory will impact the pupil’s ablity just to keep us with the lesson in general b)It will also be a challenge for the students to remember the question while doing calculations mentally. SHORT TERM MEMORIES Solution :
a) Teacher should avoid giving lengthy instructions to the students . Big numbers should be broken down into smaller bits eg : 712 563 449.
b) Repeat the questions , or put key numbers on the board. Problem 2: A pupil leaves lot
of questions unanswered Solution:
a)This could be due to lack of confidence, anxiety or attitude problem or difficulty level of sums. The questions should be framed in easy language as the purpose is to test concepts. Provide hints and clues on the next slide to motivate the children to solve the sums Problem 3: The pupil has difficulty in reading and interpreting word problem Solution : Sleepe framework provides access to online dictionary that enables children to simplify terms . It teaches students the SQ3R method ie Survey, question, read , review, respond. This gives them a direction to approach the sums. Problem 4: Sequencing skills

a) Problem: number sequence for 2 beyond 10 Solution : Progress from known to unknown concepts. Start with numbers they know ie 2, 4, 6, 8. Use that as a base and teach them patterns 12, 14, 16, 18……….22, 24 Problem 5: Long term memory



a)Students find it difficult to
recall concepts during exams Solution : Drill exercises provide enough
practice of sums of different levels of difficulty to
equip the child to beat the exam anxiety.
Best practices for teaching Math
in a more effective and fun
way through SLEEPE The worksheets provided are well spaced out to avoid confusion with appropriate font size. The framework offers analysis of the learning style and recognition of pattern in the errors
Sleepe framework motivates the children by providing a progress chart which illustrates student’s progress towards established goals. Students are rewarded with points and other incentives for their success.
It makes learning fun by using innovative methods such as a)Mix and match: The problem is written on
a card of one color and the answer on the card
of another color. The child picks the correct card
for the question which tests the child’s concepts.
b)Memory or Concentration: Memory games
c)Bingo 48 + 3 – 7 = __________ and... the children selects the correct answer :-) BINGO! ( Ioana could not make her deliverable because she did not uploaded the last assignment. For this reason, the group decided to co-operate in group to do this part ) LEADER THE MAIN GOAL OF PRESCHOOL MATH The main goal of preschool math is to develop understanding and insight into the patterns of Maths
through concrete materials. The activities of matching , sorting and categorizing help the children to organize the objects
according to the properties and attributes. It develops logical and language skills as the children
notice and describe small details in the materials that they are sorting and classifying. Logical thinking is the language of Maths. A guiding principle for Math curriculum : Let’s see in how many different ways can Math creep
into my classroom. Our imagination is the limit and the children will be the beneficiaries of it. CURRICULUM FRAMEWORK Age 2.5 to 3 (nursery) : Pre math concepts, introduction to numbers using sand
paper patterns . Concepts of shape, size and number are taught. They learn how to
sort, match, order, sequence, count and recognise numerals a) Shapes  Identify circles, squares, rectangles, triangles , cubes, pyramids b)Counting  Count dots, shapes, objects and representation of numbers upto 20 c)Positions  Inside and outside
 Left and right
 Left, middle and right
 Above and below
 Top and bottom d)Classify  Same
 Different
 Same and different
Classify by colour e)Size  Long and short
 Tall and short
 Light and heavy
 Holds more or less
 Compare height, mass and capacity
 Wide and narrow 3) Senior.kindergarten( Age 4.5 to 5 ) a)Numbers and counting up to 3 Represent numbers - up to 3
Count by typing - up to 3
Count up and down b)Numbers and counting up to 20 Represent numbers - up to 20
Count up and down - with pictures and numbers
Number lines - up to 20
Before, after and between - up to 20
Count forward and backward - up to 20
Names of numbers - up to 20
Complete a sequence - up to 20 c) Skip-counting Skip-count by twos, fives and tens d)Comparing Concept of few, equal and more by grouping , using charts. e)Patterns Similar and growing patterns
Complete missing parts of patterns f) Addition Addition with pictures and numbers - sums up to 10 g) Subtraction Subtract with pictures - numbers up to 10
Subtraction sentences - numbers up to 10 h)Positions Inside and outside
Left, middle, right, top, bottom
Above and below
Location in a three-by-three grid i)Time Match clocks and times
Read time of everyday events
Match analog and digital clocks
Seasons
A.M. and P.M. j)Sorting, ordering and classifying Same and different
Classification by colour
Put numbers up to 10 in order (ascending) k)Measurement Long and short
Tall and short
Light and heavy
More or less l)Geometry Identify shapes and figures
Count and compare sides and corners
Geometry of everyday objects
m)Vocabulary: sum and difference 3) Grade 1( Age 6 to 7 ) a)Counting and number patterns Counting tens and ones - up to 99
Counting by twos, fives and tens - up to 100
Number lines
Identifying even and odd numbers
Before or after concept
Skip-counting patterns - with tables, pictures
Sequences - count up and down by 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10
Ordinal numbers
Writing numbers in words b)Addition Addition with pictures, sentences, word problems - sums to 10
Word problems - adding three numbers
Applying related addition facts to real life situations. c)Subtraction Subtraction with pictures, word problems, sentences - numbers up to 10
Subtracting zero and all
Subtracting doubles d)Comparing Comparing numbers up to 100 Comparison word problems e)Estimating Estimate to the nearest ten 4) Grade 2 ( Age 7 to 8 ) a)Fractions Halves, thirds
and fourths
Equal parts
Simple fractions: parts of a group
Fractions - word problems
Compare fractions
Simple fractions: which shape matches the fraction? b)Geometry Identify two and three dimensional shapes
Area and Perimeter - word problems
Compare sides, vertices, edges and faces c)Spatial sense Left, middle, right, above, below, top, bottom
Location in a three-by-three grid d)Data and graphs  Pictographs
 Reading and interpreting line and bar graphs. Loading...e)Measurement  Long and short
 Tall and short
 Light and heavy
 Holds more or less
 Compare size, mass and capacity f)Money  Compare money amounts h)Mixed operations  Addition and subtraction of terms and solving word problems i) Probability and statistics More, less and equally likely
Certain, probable, unlikely and impossible j)Sorting, ordering and classifying Put numbers in order (ascending and descending ) k)Time Days of the week
Months of the year
Reading clocks
Seasons of the year
Read a calendar l)Counting and number patterns  Skip-counting sequences with stories and puzzles
 Counting patterns and number lines - up to 100
 Hundreds chart
 Even or odd numbers, before and after concept m)Comparing and ordering  Inequalities with addition and subtraction - up to 100
 Comparing and arranging numbers up to 1,000 n)Names of numbers  Ordinal numbers up to 100th
 Writing numbers up to 1,000 in words
 Distinguishing ordinal and cardinal numbers
Roman numerals I, V, X, L o)Addition - three digits I.1 Add multiples of 100
I.2 Add two three-digit numbers
I.3 Addition input/output tables - up to three digits
I.4 Addition word problems - up to three digits
I.5 Complete the addition sentence - up to three digits
I.6 Write the addition sentence - up to three digits
I.7 Balance addition equations - up to three digits p)Subtraction - three digits J.1 Subtract multiples of 100
J.2 Subtract three-digit numbers
J.3 Subtraction input/output tables - up to three digits
J.4 Subtraction word problems - up to three digits
J.5 Complete the subtraction sentence - up to three digits
J.6 Write the subtraction sentence - up to three digits
J.7 Balance subtraction equations - up to three digits q)Properties Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts
Solve inequalities using addition and subtraction shortcut r)Place values Place value models - up to thousands
Regrouping tens and ones II
Convert to/from a number - up to thousands
Convert between place values - up to thousands
Convert from expanded form - up to thousands
Identify the digit in the ones, tens, hundreds or thousands place s)Estimation and rounding Round to the nearest ten, hundred or thousand
Estimate sums t)Logical reasoning Guess the number u)Measurement Long and short
Tall and short
Light and heavy
Holds more or less
Compare size, mass and capacity
Read a thermometer
Compare and convert metric units of length, mass, volume
Choose the appropriate measuring tool v)Mixed operations Addition and subtraction word problems - up to 100
Addition and subtraction - balance equations - up to 100
Input/output tables - write the rule - up to 100
Which sign (+ or -) makes the number sentence true? w)Multiplication and Division Multiplication sentences
Multiplication tables up to 10
Divisors and quotients up to 10 5) Grade 3 (Age 8 to 9) a)Numbers and comparing Write numbers in words
Ordinal numbers to 100th
Roman numerals I, V, X, L, C, D, M
Even and odd II
Skip-counting puzzles
Number sequences
Put numbers in order
Which number is greatest/least?
Comparing - with addition and subtraction
Multi-step inequalities b)Place values Place value names
Value of a digit
Identify the digit with a particular place value
Convert to/from a number
Convert between place values
Convert from expanded form
Convert between standard and expanded form
Place value word problems c)Addition Add two numbers with four or more digits Loading... Addition input/output tables - four or more digits
Add two numbers with four or more digits - word problems
Complete the addition sentence - four or more digits
Balance equations - four or more digits
Add three or more numbers with four or more digits - word problems
Addition: fill in the missing digits d)Subtraction Subtraction patterns over increasing place values
Subtract numbers with four or more digits
Subtraction input/output tables - four or more digits
Subtraction: fill in the missing digits e)Multiplication Multiplication word problems - facts to 12
Missing factors - facts to 12
Missing factors - facts to 12 - word problems
Multiplication patterns over increasing place values
Multiply numbers ending in zeroes
Multiply a one-digit number by a larger number - word problems
Multiply three or more numbers
Multiplication input/output tables f)Multiplication - skill builders Multiplication tables till 12 g)Division Division facts to 12
Division patterns over increasing place values
Divide numbers ending in zeroes
Divide larger numbers
Divide larger numbers - word problems
Divisibility rules for 2, 5 and 10
Division input/output tables h)Division - skill builders Division till 12 i)Mixed operations Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division facts
Complete the addition, subtraction, multiplication or division sentence
Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division word problems Loading... Interpret data in tables
Multi-step word problems
Missing operators j)Properties Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division terms
Solve using properties of addition, multiplication, division k)Equations and variables Identify equations
Solve for the variable
Write variable equations to represent word problems l)Estimation and rounding  Round money amounts
 Rounding puzzles
 Solve inequalities using estimation
 Estimate sums , products , quotients
 m)Logical reasoning  Guess the number
 Largest/smallest number possible
 Find the order
 Age puzzles
 Guess two numbers based on sum, difference, product and quotient n)Money  Count coins and bills
 Which picture shows more?
 Making change
 Inequalities with money
 Put money amounts in order
 Add money amounts - word problems
 Price lists o)Time Read clocks and write times
Elapsed time
Read a calendar
Relate time units
Time patterns
Convert between hours and fractions of hours
Reading schedules - 24-hour time Loading... Time lines p)Graphs Interpret pictographs
Create pictographs
Interpret line graphs
q)Measurement Read a thermometer
Compare and convert metric units of length, mass, volume
Conversion tables r)Geometry Count and compare sides, edges, faces and vertices
Reflection, rotation and translation
Area and perimeter
Angles: greater than, less than or equal to a right angle
Lines, line segments and rays
Polygons
Triangles: equilateral, isosceles and scalene, acute, right, obtuse s)Fractions Fractions on number lines
Compare fractions
Equivalent fractions
Reducing fractions to simplest form
Put fractions in order
Fractions of a number - word problems t)Decimals T.2 Conversion of decimals into fractions and viceversa
T.3 Understanding decimals expressed in words
T.4 Number sequences involving decimals
T.6 Arrangement of decimal numbers in ascending or descending order
T.8 Add and subtract decimals - word problems 6) Grade 4 ( Age 9 to 10 ) a)Number sense  Place values
 Convert between place values
 Word names for numbers
 Roman numerals Loading... Prime and composite numbers
 Rounding up of values
 Even and odd
 Inequalities with number lines
 Compare numbers up to five digits b)Addition  Add numbers up to five digits: word problems
 Addition: fill in the missing digits
 Properties of addition
 Add three or more numbers up to five digits each
 Addition patterns over increasing place values
 Choose numbers with a particular sum
 Estimate sums: word problems c)Subtraction  Subtract numbers up to five digits: word problems
 Subtraction: fill in the missing digits
 Subtraction patterns over increasing place values
 Choose numbers with a particular difference
 Estimate differences: word problems d)Multiplication  Multiplication facts to 10
 Choose the multiples of a given number up to 12
 Multiply one-digit numbers by larger numbers
 Multiplication patterns over increasing place values
 Properties of multiplication
 Estimate products: word problems
 Choose numbers with a particular product
 Multiply numbers ending in zeroes: sums and word problems
 Multiply three numbers
 Inequalities with multiplication e)Division  Division facts to 10: sums
and word problems
 Properties of division
 Divide larger numbers: sums and word problems
 Complete the division table
 Interpret remainders
 Choose numbers with a particular quotient
 Divide numbers ending in zeroes
 Estimate quotients: sums and word problems
 Divisibility rules Division patterns over increasing place values
 Inequalities with division Loading...f)Mixed operations  Add, subtract, multiply and divide
 Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division word problems
 Estimate sums, differences, products and quotients: word problems
 Multi-step word problems
 Word problems with extra or missing information
 Choose numbers with a particular sum, difference, product or quotient
 Mentally add and subtract numbers ending in zeroes
 Inequalities involving addition, subtraction, multiplication and division g)Algebra  G.2 Write variable expressions: sums and word problems
 G.3 Evaluate variable expressions
 G.4 Write variable equations to represent word problems
 G.5 Solve variable equations h)Functions  Input/output tables with addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
 Function tables
 Write linear functions
 Graph linear functions i)Logical reasoning  Guess two numbers based on sum, difference, product and quotient
 Find the order j)Patterns  Geometric growth patterns
 Increasing growth patterns
 Numeric patterns: word problems
 Mixed patterns review k)Data, charts and graphs Read a table
Interpret line and bar graphs
Interpret pictographs
Create bar graphs
Circle graphs l)Money Compare and rounding up money amounts
Add and subtract money amounts
m)Measurement Choose the appropriate metric unit of measure
Compare and convert metric units of length, mass, volume n)Time Convert time units
Add and subtract mixed time units
Fractions of time units
Find start and end times: multi-step word problems
Convert between 12-hour and 24-hour time
Time zones - 24-hour time
Transportation schedules - 24-hour time
Time patterns o)Geometry Identify planar and solid figures
Types of triangles
Open and closed shapes and qualities of polygons
Acute, right, obtuse, reflex and straight angles
Area and perimeter
Lines of symmetry
Rotational symmetry
Lines, line segments and rays
Parallel lines
Perpendicular bisector p)Fractions  Equivalent fractions
 Reduce fractions to simplest form
 Compare fractions q)Decimals  Understanding decimals expressed in words
 Place values in decimal numbers
 Equivalent decimals
 Convert fractions to decimals
 Convert decimals to fractions
 Compare decimals and fractions
 Round decimals
 Compare decimal numbers
 Put decimal numbers in order
 Number sequences involving decimals
 Solve decimal problems using diagrams r) Addition and Substract of Decimals Add and subtract decimals: sums and word problems
Inequalities with addition and subtraction
Estimate sums and differences of Decimals Three-Minute Classroom Walk-Through Understanding the rationale underlaying the walk-through and reflective practice approach The following questions might start you on your reflective thoughts: How often do you or did your supervisor walk into the classroom? How long do you or did your supervisor stay in the classroom on these walk-throughs? How frequently do you or did your supervisor provide follow-up? What was the nature of the follow-up? Reflection (Initial Reflections on Walk-throughs and Follow-up) (Write your comments) What is the Downey Walk- Through Downey Walk-Throughs involve five key ideas: 1. Short, focused, yet informal observation. It is like taking a short video clip of the moment. There is no intent to evaluate the teacher; rather it is a time to gather information about curricular and instructional teaching practices and decisions teachers are amking. To focus our time in the classroom, the walk-through includes a five-step observational structure for gathering information. If our goal isone of professional growth rather than evaluation of the individual, a short visit is all that is required to provide ample data to promote teacher growth. Possible area for Reflection. The major goal of this brief informal observation is to trigger a thought that might be useful for the teacher to consider, one that might help the teacher in his or her decision making about effective practice.Follow-up is provided to give oppertunities for reflective thought. Curriculum as well as Instructional focus. While you are in the classroom observing, you will want to gather data about the curriculum and instructional secesions being made and notice their impact on student behavior. Follow-up occurs only on occation and not after every visit While you are in the classroom, think about whether you wish to have a conversation with the teacher about any decisions the teacher is making. This needs to be done

before you move to the next classroom. Decide whether you will be providing a follow-up conversation on some teaching practice for reflection.

Informal and Collaborative There is no checklist of things to look for or judjements to be made. The approach is informal, informal, and informal! The approach is about colleagues working together to help each other think about practice. Why Walk-Throughs? Reflection (Why should Walk-Throughs be a high priority in your work?) (Write your comments) Reasons for walk-throughs  The frequent sampling of a teacher’s actions gives greater validity to whatv you observe  Frequent observations often lower teacher apprehension over time, making formal observations more effective  The more you know about how people are functioning and making decisions, the more you know about the school’s operations.  The more you observe, the more you learn – the greater the repertoire of strategies you can share with your staff  You can identify common areas of decisions that might provive valuable for group staff development – entire faculty, department level, and grade level groups  You can observe how effective your staff development endeavors have been in imparting teaching behavior in the classroom  If parents call about a concern, you have your own observational data, in most cases, of the teacher’s intentions and practice. You are better informed.  It helps you identify possible individuals who might become marginal if you do not provide assistance quickly.  It helps you keep perspective about your work Ultimate Goals of the Walk-Through approach With Reflective Dialogue o Reflective, self-directed, sel-analytical, interdependent teachers who examine their own practices o Teacher who are continually willing to improve their teaching practices
o Reachers who are committed to teaching the presribed curriculum student learnings and to working for even student higher achievenment. The collaborative, reflective dialogue following classroom visits  Builds on the fact that change is intrapersonal – it comes from within  Focuses on the use of intrinsic motivational strategies that honour the teacher and his or her decisions versus telling the teacher what to do  Recognizes the teacher’s level of experience and readiness for self-direction  Engages in dialogue that moves the teacher to self-analysis  Encourages collegial interactions and enables educators to learn together in an interdependent way. For those in the supervisory roles with teachers, the shift should be away from a conventional supervisory approach towards a collegial one. The shift is as follows:  Collegial rather than a hierarchical relationship between teachers and supervisors  Focused on teacher development rather than teacher conformity  Facilitative of teachers collaborating with each other in instructional improvement efforts  Supportive of teacher involvement in ongoing reflective enquiry Downey’s model had continued to evolve in several ways:  The supervisor acted as a coach and mentor rather than a judge  The supervisor viewed the teacher as the primary client for impacting student achievement  Interaction between principal and teacher moved from extrinsicmotivators (positive praise) to intrinsic motivations focused on teacher efficacy  The focused moved towards encouraging reflective inquiry by teachers on their practices and decisions and moved away from direct feedback from a supervisor.  It was recognized that it is the reflective question that has the power to change what teachers believe. Conducting the Walk-Through Observation A five-Step Process Before the five steps are presented, take a momemt to think about what you do when you conduct walk-through in classrooms. The following questions might start you on your reflective thoughts: What do you pay attention to first? What do you do, for example, walk around, look at student work, talk with students, talk to the teacher? What do you observe? What do you do with the data you gather? Reflections (Write your comments) Five-Step Walk-Through observation Structure Step 1: Student Orientation to the Work – Do students appear to be attending when you first walk into the room? The goal of this step is to notice whether students appear to be oriented to the work. This step is just a cursory glance. If, however, we see nonattending behavior on numerous visits, we need to be observant as to what might be creating the off-task behavior. Attending behavior is a prerequisite to learning. Step 2: Curricular Decision Points – What objectives has the teacher chosen to teach at this time and how alligned are they to the prescribed curriculum The basic purpose of step 2 is to determine the allignment of the taught curriculum with the prescribed curriculum. Analysis of the student objectives (The 3 C’s) Content: The skill, knowledge, process, concept to be learned by the students Context: The conditions under which students will demonstrate the learning (student mode of response, materials and information given to them orally or in writing) Cognitive Type: Knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, evaluation Step 3: Instructional Decision Points – What instructional practices is the teacher choosing to use at this time to help students achieve the learning of the lesson objectives? Step 3 components  Determine the generic instructional decisions being made. Generic practices are those that could be used regardless of student age or suject area. (feedback, using examples, non-linguistic representations etc.)  Identify strategies being used (reciprocal teaching, cooperative learning etc.)  Observe specific research-based, subject-specific practices, such as the use of mata-cognitive strategies, manipulatives, or mental computations in Mathematics. Step 4: “Walk-the-Walls”: Curricular and Instructional Decisions – What evidence is there of past objectives taught and/or instructional decisions used to teach the objectives that are present in the classroom – walk-the walls, portfolios, projects in the room? Step 5: Safety and Health Issues – Are there any noticeable safety or healyh issues that need to be addressed? As you enter and exit classrooms, you will note particular safety or health issues. This is not a formal inspection or situation for placing blame; it is a time for making helpful observations. Determining whether Walk-Throughs are the Right Stuff Management By Wandering Around (MBWA) Outcomes of MBWA: based on Research Enhanced teacher satisfaction as defined by higher frequency of “flow” experiences Improved teacher self-efficacy Improved teacher attitude towards professional development Improved teacher attitude towards teacher appraisal Increased perceived teacher efficacy of other teachers Improved classroom instruction Improved teacher perception of principal effectiveness Improved student discipline and student acceptance of advice and criticism Improved teacher-perceived effectiveness of the school Linking the Walk-Through Process to a Model of Teacher Growth Walk-through process is a form of differentiated professional development. The typical approach to formalized professional development today is based on the assumption that there is one set of procedures that works for all teachers. This is simply not the case. Professional development that is effective for a beginning teacher is far different from that which is effective for teachers at other points in their careers. The walk-through process lends itself to these differing needs. Thake a few minutes to reflect on the type of professional development that has been most effective for you during your career. As a beginning teacher, did you find that you needed some one to talk to about instructional practice? Who filled that role for you? How would you describe those conversations? What was your role, and what was the role of the person you were talking to? Did mutual trust and respect impact those conversations? In what way? As you gained experience in the classroom over several years, did you still seek out someone you felt comfortable with to dialogue about role as a professional educator? Did the nature of those conversations change over time? If so, how? When do you have the most meaningful conversations about practice now? With whom? What role does your school principal play in these conversations? Reflection (Reflections on how meaningful conversations about practice change over time) (Write your coments here) Walk-Throughs and the Teacher Growth Model The model is developmental because it proposes and describes an ongoing process that takes place throughout a teaching career. In the life cycle model, each of the six phases is content and task specific and exists along the continuum of excellent teaching. The strength of this model is its focus on the process of how one continues to grow and become more competent. The model is grounded in transformative learning theory. If teachers are not successful in attaining personal and professional growth via reflective activities, they enter a negative, downward spiral.
The model also connects personal and reflective development and growth to specific external factors such as reactions/responses to conflict, changing social contexts, and the impact of school cultures. The Model The life cycle of the career teacher model is based on the premise that, given the appropriate learning environment, teachers will continue to grow and develop throughout their professional lifetime. The model identifies six phases of development: Novice, Apprentice, Professional, Expert, Distinguished, and Emeriyus. Novice Teacher The novice phase begins when preservice teachers first encounter practicum experiences as part of their teacher education programme. Apprentice Teacher This phase begins for most teachers when they receive responsibility for planning and delivering instruction on their own. Typically, the apprentice phase includes the induction period and extends into the second or third year of teaching. Professional Teacher The professional phase emerges as teachers grow in their self-confidence as educators. Expert Teacher This phase symbolizes achievement of the high standards desired by ……. School/board/curriculum. The goal of this model is to assure that all teachers develop their skills to operate at this expert level. Distinguished Teacher This phase is reserved for teachers who are truly gifted in their field. They exceed current expectations for what teachers are expected to know and do. These teachers are the leaders of the profession. Emeritus Teacher Teachers at this stage are those who want to continue, after retirement, to make contributions to the field. JYOTHI'S FRAMEWORK Note: The charts from the different subjects are not in Prezi, but in Our Journal. They are practices. Here, we have the theory :-) , and how we will applied this theory to practice. The child selects the right answer. Audio and Visual aids to facilitate learning for the slow learners, visually and hearing
impaired children
Videos, Powerpoint presentation are used to make concepts more interesting.
It uses drill/ practice sessions to assess the understanding and knowledge of students.
The biggest advantage of Sleepe framework is it involves all the stakeholders in the
process of education. iii) Curriculum at Sleepe framework is build on the following Maxims of teaching Simple to Complex
Known to Unknown
Concrete to Abstract MATHS MAIN SUBJECTS OF THE SLEEPE FRAMEWORK SCIENCE FRENCH AND SPANISH THANKS TO SARA RODRÍGUEZ Subjects of the Sleepe Framework are interactive. Using different methods of teaching, and innovative ones which helps students to understand the main concepts, and do not forget them never in life because memorizing is not important, but understanding is. These methods are interactive, and are opened to people all around the world. It is sustainable because of what I explained in ' The Sleepe Framework' Even people with problem disabilities can take it, and feel integrated in our project. Students learn concepts in an efficient way. They apply those concepts to reality, and that is wonderful because we are sorrounded by mathematics everywhere we go. Thanks to Ruchi, Maths will be easy to learn. The use of methodical and practical exercises, will help students a lot. Furthermore, classes are interactive so that they will not get bored. Thanks to Ruchi Thanks so much for reading our project Thanks to Sara Rodríguez, students will learn everything in a very quickly way. Dynamics classes with video lectures, and the use of diverse media such as Facebook, Twitter... will be included in her programme. Because learning two languages at the same time have never been so easy. SCIENCE Thanks to Hema, students will learn those specific and basic lessons of science so that pupils can become good researchers, and scientists the day after tomorrow. Note: Hema's deliverables are on the Journal
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