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Empowering Students through Peer Advising

Learn the steps to choosing the right major for you!
by

Brian Foster

on 30 July 2013

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Transcript of Empowering Students through Peer Advising

Milena Flament
Questions and Sharing
Proponent of the
"Flipped" Classroom
CEO Peer Advising
Group
Shared
Experiences
Model
Explore your
Options

PA
R
E
P
A
RE
Empowering Students through Collaborative Peer Advising
Presented by Brian Foster
P
ARE
First Year Experience
One-Stop
Student Advising
Peer Advising
Program
Case Studies

Student
Ambassador
Model
Majoropoly
Find out how to
choose a major!
Major = Career
My major is permanent
Source: Major Decisions, Pennsylvania State University, by Michael J. Leonard
» The average person changes
career
fields
between
2-3 times
» You're not alone... around
80%
of first-year students say they are
unsure
on what to major in
» On average, students
change majors

around
3 times
before graduating
How do you know your values?
Which values are important to you?
Collaborating
with people
vs. learning
alone
Manipulating
numbers
vs.
words
Learning with
hands/building
Learning in the
outdoors
Learning with
computers
Learning from the
community
Creativity
Helping
others/society
An
advisor
can help link your
values
with potential
majors
We have a network of resources to support you!
Let's
PARE
down your options...
L
A
N
C
T
E
F
L
E
C
T
PAR
E
V
A
L
U
A
T
E
» A few majors
are linked
to careers (teaching)
» most majors will
help to prepare you for
many careers
Pre-Med (Law, Dent, etc) must all major in the same thing
» Major choice
doesn't
necessarily matter
» What
does?
Completion of
prereqs
academic
performance
MCAT
recommendation
letters
practical
experience
What do you do with a
BA in English...
» Remember the list of top
traits employers are looking
for? (#1-
Writing Ability
)
*Major Decisions, Pennsylvania State University, by Michael J. Leonard
» There
are
many careers directly linked to
English
» Only
40%
of the workforce
is working in a field
directly
related
to undergrad. major*
Academic
Advisor
Personal
Counselor
Career
Counselor
Explore

the educational
pathways
to earn a major
Explore '
who you are
'
Discover your
values
Personality
Tests/
Skills
Inventories
Learn about job
outlook/salaries
Make an
educational

plan
and
set goals
Find out about
internships
Get
resume/interview
tips
Connect
interests/values with a
major
Now
that you have a plan...
it's time to
ACT!
Attend

information

sessions
Take introductory classes
Talk to faculty/departmental advisors
Get an internship/job shadow
Invite graduates/leaders in the field out to coffee
Seem like something I could spend
years
studying?
If not, try out something new... you're never stuck with just one major forever!
Think carefully about your experiences and
ask yourself: does this major...
What if I like my major but my parents don't?
Align with my

values,

skills, and interests?
Make me feel
good
?
Make sure you're meeting
frequently with your advisor
to check in on:

Proper course sequence
School/life/work balance
Grade trends
Future options
Resources
Advising
Personal Counseling
Multicultural Services
TRiO
Tutoring Center
Career Center
DisabilityResources
Financial Aid
Curriculum

Based
Model
What is
Peer
Advising... or Peer
Educating
?
"
Peer educators are students who have been



to offer
educational services

to their peers.

These services are intentionally designed to assist peers toward
attainment of educational goals.”
(Newton and Ender p. 6)
selected
trained
and designated
by a campus authority
Why
Peer Advising?
Benefits to the
student
Benefits to the
peer
Benefits to
advising/institution
Information and mentorship from an "insider" during formative years (University of Denver, 2007)
Institutional Engagement (link to Academic Achievement) (Titus, 2004)
Building meaningful relationships to help
transition student to faculty/staff interaction
(Miller 2007)
Leadership Development
Institutional Engagement (link to Academic Achievement) (Titus, 2004)
Staff/Faculty Mentorship
Relationship Building
Greatly increases scope/reach of advising
Cost-effective
Better meet the needs of target populations
Staff hone leadership and mentoring skills
Increased persistence and retention (FYE)
"steward of campus culture"
Student Panel
WHAT IS CEO?
Profile of a
CEO
Student
16-20 years old
Education and training towards a certificate or transfer degree at BC (free tuition until student turns 21)
Career exploration
Resume Building
CEO
Provides
Not currently enrolled in High School
Has not earned a High School diploma
Basic Academic Advising
Why
is Peer Advising Needed?
No formal academic advising
Students are in formative time in their education
Vulnerable population
Highly diverse population; not many staff on campus really understand what it's like to be a CEO student
Model:
Curriculum Based
6 stand-alone lessons on college success
1. Introduction/Get to Know your Students
2. Tour of Student Services/Campus Resources
3. Overview of Degrees and Certificates Offered
4. Major/Career Exploration
5. Study Skills and Time Management
6. Clubs and Campus Activities Overview
Bellevue College
Established: 1966
Quarterly Enrollment: 20,000 students
3rd Largest Institution of Higher Education in WA
Gender: 55% Female 45% Male
Average Age: 30 years
Enrollment Status: 57% Full Time 43% Part Time
Area of Study: 59% Academic Transfer 41% Professional/Technical
Annual International Student Enrollment: 1,600
Characteristics
2nd year
CEO students mentor
1st quarter
CEO students
Each peer advisor meets
twice per month
(
30 minutes per session
) with a group of
10 students
Students have curriculum to follow, but are strongly encouraged to
"go off script"
when appropriate
Training Model
1-hour long
initial training that includes a training
manual
outlining:
key
goals
and
outcomes
expectations,
responsibilities, and scenarios modeling
good student interactions
troubleshooting
tips ("what if my advisee asks...")
lesson
plans
Continued
training (mostly by email) on each individual lesson before that session begins
Check-in's/debriefing
to see what's working and what isn't
Successes
Targets and advises an
at-risk
population that does not normally seek out
traditional
advising
Builds
leadership
and
mentoring
skills in peer advisors
Pre/Post
survey results
indicate that after peer advising students:
Feel
supported
at BC (
18%
increase)
Understand where to access
key resources
like DRC (
25%
increase)
Feel more
comfortable
approaching
instructors
with concerns or questions (
6%
increase)
Understand
key processes
like how to submit a repeated grade request (
68%
increase)
Check BC
Emails
more often (
26%
increase)
Answer "How
confident
are you that you will
graduate
from BC" (
31%
increase)
Answer "How
confident
are you that you know which
degree
or
certificate
you will be pursuing" (
15%
decrease)
Answer "How
comfortable
are you in going to see an
academic advisor
?" (
34%
increase)
Challenges
Difficult to coordinate
student schedules
;
last minute issues come up.
FLEXIBILITY
Very
limited pool
of peer advisors to choose from
Part of a small program (around 100 students)
Limited
amount of time
for peers/mentees to interact (30 minutes twice per month)
Class
instruction time
needed; students don't live on campus; go straight
from class to home
Faculty buy-in
may be huge obstacle in the future
Next
Collaborative
brought three different departments together
Steps
Train peer advisors to
give presentations
to classrooms (both in and outside of CEO)
Develop measures for peers to evaluate which mentees might make
good peer advisors next year
Develop more
1-1 interaction
with peers (email advising... could be a burden?)
Expand program
outside
of CEO and target other populations that
don't typically seek out traditional advising
Recommendations for Others
Try to
"Step-back"
and relinquish as much
control
as possible to peer advisors after the foundation is in place
Collaboration
is key; secure
buy-in
to avoid cross-departmental politics.
Assessment
is important; not only quantitative, but frequently
check-in
with peer advisors
Learn from the
students
as much as they (hopefully) are learning from
you
Profile of a One-Stop Student
One-Stop
Provides:
First ti
me to college student/no prior college experience
Characteristics
Training Model
A friendly
welcome
to Bellevue College!
Successes

Trained for
multiple tasks:
registration assistance, explaining resources, photocopying, etc.
Challenges
Next Steps
Recommendations for Others
Three-hour
orientation
and
check-ins
throughout the year
Profile of an FYE Student
FYE Provides:

Former advising ambassadors report a strong connection to the offic
e: "I learned an extraordinary amount about the people around me [...] my supervisor, and also the faculty and professional advisors whose relationship with students I helped to facilitate
"


Hiring/training process is outside of the norm
. No centralized student Employment Office
Characteristics
Training Model
Continue to
integrate
students into the office. How can we create year-long employment?

Continue to
cross-train
students for other functions
Successes
Challenges
Reflections on the "sandwiching" method...




Relationships, relationships, relationships...
Next Steps
First time to college
-

New to college classroom experience
Recommendations
For Others
1-credit class
10 hrs over two days


"Low Touc
h" Peer Educating
Standard application used to collect
contact
and
scheduling data

Seasonal
"briefing"
session. Assists students in answering questions:


Program ha
s strengthened Advising's relationshi
ps with Student Program
s
Student
has applied
, taken the Math & English
assessment
, and is now ready to
meet
with
a faculty advisor
An introductory
video
of how advising works
A packet of new student
resources
(quarterly schedule, list of student support services, etc.)
30-minutes with a
general, faculty or staff advisor
An opportunity to learn how to
register
for classes and leave with a printed schedule and
next steps
So
many
FYE sections! Coordination
nightmare.
Not the full vision yet...
Better
assess
this portion of FYE
Continue
the
collaboration!
One-Stop "advising ambassadors" are
seasonal
Recruited via
recommendations
from staff and faculty; invited to apply.
Think about recruiting from
other departments
who already utilize student employees
Job application
includes instructions for submittng a resume, cover letter and references
Learning
outcomes
based
Provide a more
standard structure
(currently question free-for-all
)
FYE often held during
break
or on the
weekend
Not all classes are
alike
in terms of student
engagement
- Class/Instructor preferences
- Drugs on Campus
-
Parking
Provides a

needed break

in FYE curriculum
Students
listen to their peers

and get their individual questions answered
(qualitative feedback from FYE reports that students most enjoy the Educational Planning Module and the Student Panel
)
30-minute
Q&A session
during first day of FYE with students
actively involved
in Student Programs
True collaboration
with
Student Programs!
... which all result in 7% higher retention for students who complete One-Stop and FYE
Relationship!
Student:student & student:faculty
Introduction to Bellevue College
"college knowledge"
Already received first quarter advising
- Registered for FYE during One-Stop
10+ credits (or less)
- Required for those taking 10+ credits
Students can be trained to perform office functions to prep a student for an advising session and to close out the session (e.g., teaching students how to register)
Intentionally integrate student employees into day-to-day office culture.
How powerful is it when a new student sees the positive relationship (and the trust and respect) that a student employee has with professional staff in an office?
- phone operators
- front desk staff
- "Registration Assistants"
Seasonal...
students want more work.
High turnover rate
Some are hired in May and transfer in September.
Student connection!
97% of new students reported that their experience with the advising ambassador was either "excellent" or "good."
Faculty advisors report not feeling rushe
d in their advising sessions when advising ambassadors are present.
Payment can be done in
alternate ways
(e.g., bookstore vouchers)
Designate a
"lead peer"
for assistance with scheduling
Full transcript