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Othello Act 5 Scene 1

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Tiffany Farrugia

on 12 December 2013

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Transcript of Othello Act 5 Scene 1

Othello Act 5 Scene 1

Plot Summary
Literary Devices
Idea 1
Idea 2
Characterization
Dramatic Purpose
"The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society… In almost every act of our daily lives, whether in the sphere of politics or business, in our social conduct or our ethical thinking, we are dominated by the relatively small number of persons … who understand the mental processes and social patterns of the masses. It is they who pull the wires which control the public mind."
Asides
Purpose of events happening
it is important for these events to happen because with Cassio injured, there is no one else who will confess to Desdemona's innocence. Othello thinks Cassio is dead so he goes on to kill Desdemona. This scene is also the peak of Iago's plan because after this scene, everything else goes downhill for Iago.
Important Quotes
“This is the night / That either makes me, or fordoes undoes me quite” (Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 1, 128–129).
Roderigo
Roderigo is very unintelligent and is easily fooled by his "wingman" Iago. One might say he is dim witted because in this scene he attacks Cassio, the lieutenant of the Venetian army, even though he has less experience in fighting than Cassio.
Iago
According to Antonio a villain should be: Powerful, Intelligent, Immoral, Wounded, and Determined.
Bianca
Plot Advancement
Iago is done plotting and scheming
His plan is now in action
Establish Atmosphere
Creates a chaotic atmosphere
Cassio attacked and Roderigo murdered
Unsure of who as done it
Dramatic Irony
Othello: "Tis he. Oh, brave Iago, honest and just/ That hast such noble sense of thy friend’s wrong!/ Thou teachest me." Lines 32-34
Iago: "I have rubbed this young quat almost to the sense,/ And he grows angry." Line 11
Pro
Con
Pro
Con
Iago Aside
"I have rubb'd this young quat almost to the/sense, And he grows angry. Now, whether he kill Cassio/Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other,/Every way makes my gain. Live Roderigo,/He calls me to a restitution large/Of gold and jewels that I bobb'd from him/As gifts to Desdemona./It must not be. If Cassio do remain/He hath a daily beauty in his life/That makes me ugly; and besides, the Moor/May unfold me to him—there stand I in much peril./No, he must die. But soft, I hear him coming." Lines 11-22
Othello Asides
"The voice of Cassio: Iago keeps his word." Line 28
"It is even so" Line 29
"'Tis he. Oh, brave Iago, honest and just,/That hast such noble sense of thy friend’s wrong!/Thou teachest me. Minion, your dear lies dead,/And your unblest fate hies.Strumpet, I come!/Forth of my heart those charms, thine eyes, are blotted;/Thy bed, lust-stain'd, shall with lust’s blood be spotted." Lines 31-36
Iago Aside
"This is the night/ That either makes me, or fordoes me quite." Lines 128-129
Iago and Roderigo waits for Cassio outside Bianca's house
Roderigo gets severely wounded
Iago wounds Cassio without being seen
Othello hears the fight and assumes Cassio is dead
Lodovico and Gratiano hears the fight and goes to help Cassio
Iago kills Roderigo and pretends to be helping Cassio
Bianca arrives and Iago accuses her
Emilia arrives and there is a dispute between her and Bianca
So here's what happens...
"I have no great devotion to the deed, And yet he hath given me satisfying reasons." (Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 1, Line 9)
"Now, whether he kill Cassio, / Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other, Every way makes my gain." (Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 1, Lines 12-13)
"O brave Iago... Thou teaches me. Minion, your dear lies dead, / And your unblest fate hies. Strumpet, I come!"( Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 1, Lines 30, 33-34
Roderigo is very ambitious. Even though he has no chance of winning, he still persists on. It is arguable that ambition is Roderigo's tragic flaw. He doesn't know when to quit and this gets him into bad situations.
Foreshadowing
Literal Imagery
Iago: "there stand I in much peril./
No, he must die." Lines 21-22
Animal Imagery
Othello: "Thy bed, lust-stained, shall with lust’s blood be spotted." Line 36
Roderigo: "O inhuman dog!" Line 63
Bianca is a courtesan in Cyprus and her character serves as a foil to Desdemona who is faithful and virtuous . In this scene Iago insults her and calls her a strumpet but does not answer back. When Emilia insults her, she sticks up for herself. This relates to the power men had over women during that time period. Bianca displays her love for Cassio in this scene, and this creates sympathy for her because even though she is a prostitute, she still has feeling.
5 Characteristics of an Epic Villain - By: Antonio del Drago (mythicscribes.com)
Article
Iago's role as the villain in the play is equal or even greater than the hero
Power: Villains have the ability to make things bend to their will. The villain's power lies in their resource such as their wealth or influence and in some cases the villain's power is less obvious. A villain who possess keen acuity and cunning can be more dangerous than one who possess raw might. Ex) Roderigo: " I have no great devotion to the deed/ And yet he hath given me satisfying reasons"(Shakespeare, Act V, Scene I, Lines 8-9).
Intelligence: Antonio del Drago also says that an epic villain avoids making foolish decisions and carefully considers every opinion. They pose as a real challenge and they do so by being on top of their game. Iago's intelligence is reflected through his plans. Throughout the play Iago has never directly involved himself with causing trouble. His plans are genius because they lack openings for failure and opportunities for him to get caught in the act.
Immoral: To be a true villain, you must be immoral. They do not lack a sense of right or wrong but rather are willing to violate accepted moral principles to accomplish their goal. In this scene Iago shows that he is immoral because he is willing to kill Roderigo and Cassio, who both have been a true friend to him. Their friendship with Iago had no hidden motives yet Iago still despises them.
Iago's Alter Ego: Race as Projection in Othello - By: J Adelman - Shakespeare Quarterly, 1997 - wikidshakespeare.pbworks.com
Article
Relieves Suspense
Suspense has been building up throughout the play
This scene leads up to the conclusion
Reveals Theme
Theme of betrayal
Iago betrays Roderigo
Create Irony
Nobody suspects Iago of anything
Othello thinks Cassio is dead
Develop Sympathy
Sympaty towards Cassio because he has been stabbed even though he has not done anything wrong
Intelligent Manipulation

By: Edward Bernays
January, 20, 2010
Tragedy
"incidents arousing pity and fear" - Aristotle's definition of Tragedy
"As a tragedy advances to its conclusion, the
calamity and catastrophe
follow inevitably
from the deeds of men
, and the main source of these deeds is
character
." - Shakespearean tragedy
The renaissance was very chaotic period
Many Churches
Walled city was rapidly growing
Port City
Age of exploration
Very poor hygiene (rarely showered, toilets not invented yet etc)
Men and women both wore cosmetics
Elizabethans ate about 7 times more than we eat today, although mostly meant and bread
Water was dangerous to drink so the people drank bear or ale.
Rats carried diseases through lice and fleas which everyone had
Elizabethan Era/Life
Women in the Elizabethan Era
Dependent on male relatives and raised to believe they were the inferior sex
Could not go to school,vote, or even act in theaters
Disobedience to men was a crime against religion as well that could be punishable by death
Simply taught household duties
*Single Elizabethan woman looked at suspiciously*
Emilia
Although an early feminist in the play, view on Bianca was still wrongly assumed (page 124 lines 115-129)
Bianca
Tragic Hero
4) In the circumstances where we see the hero placed, his tragic trait, which is also his greatness, is fatal to him.

Othello trusts Iago and that caused jealousy which then destroyed Othello's life.

Quote : “ The voice of Cassio: Iago keeps his word. ” (5.1, 27)

Tragic Hero
5) In most cases the tragic error involves no conscious breach of right; in some, it is accompanied by a full conviction of right.

Othello believes that what he is doing is the right thing.

Quote: “Tis he. Oh, brave Iago, honest and just, That hast such noble sense of thy friend’s wrong! Thou teachest me.” (5.1, 32-34)

Themes
1) Jealousy
2) Appearance vs. Reality
3) Manipulation

Theme: Jealousy
It is interesting that Iago uses jealousy against Othello, yet jealousy is likely the source of Iago's hatred in the first place. In Othello, jealousy takes many forms, from sexual doubt to professional competition, but it is, in all cases, destructive.

Quote: "Here, stand behind this bulk, straight will he come. Wear thy good rapier bare, and put it home. Quick, quick, fear nothing; I'll be at thy elbow. It makes us or it mars us; think on that, And fix most firm thy resolution." (5.1, 1-5)

"Iago commences with an imperative, follows with a question in which he answers himself, and ends with a bold assertion.” by Marcia Macaulay ( article name: “When Chaos Is Come Again.”

Theme: Appearance and Reality
Appearance:
In the play Iago is perceived as an honorable flag carrier and friend to Othello. Othello throughout the play continuously compliments Iago’s honesty and often goes to seek his advice.

Quote : “Tis he. Oh, brave Iago, honest and just, That hast such noble sense of thy friend’s wrong! ” (5.1, 32-34)


Reality:
Iago’s true intentions are not to help Othello at all but rather to destroy his position as general and ruin his marriage with Desdemona. This is all part of his plan and also to take Cassio's position as lieutenant and to get revenge on Othello.

Quote : “I hate the Moor,
And it is thought abroad that ’twixt my sheets
He’s done my office. I know not if ’t be true,
Yet I, for mere suspicion in that kind,
Will do as if for surety.” (1.3, 377 -380)

Manipulation
In Act 5 the theme of manipulation has been used multiple times by one of the characters in the play which is Iago. Iago corrupted everybody in the story, manipulating all other characters in the play.

Quote: "Here, stand behind this bulk, straight will he come. Wear thy good rapier bare, and put it home. Quick, quick, fear nothing; I'll be at thy elbow. It makes us or it mars us; think on that, And fix most firm thy resolution." (5.1, 1-5)

Question
Question: 1) What is the only solution Iago can see concerning Cassio and Rodrigo?

Answer:
The only solution that Iago can see concerning Cassio and Rodrigo is to get rid of them both and kill them. He wanted to get rid of Cassio by telling Roderigo to kill him and he did this because if Cassio lived Iago will look ugly since Cassio is handsome and well-spoken and Othello could tell to Cassio the lies that Iago said about Cassio to Othello. He wanted to kill Rodrigo because if Roderigo lived he would ask Iago for all the gold and jewelry that Iago stole from him and said that he gave them to Desdemona.

Quote : (aside) I have rubb'd this young quat almost to the sense,
And he grows angry. Now, whether he kill Cassio,
Or Cassio him, or each do kill the other,
Every way makes my gain. Live Roderigo,
He calls me to a restitution large
Of gold and jewels that I bobb'd from him
As gifts to Desdemona.
It must not be. If Cassio do remain,
He hath a daily beauty in his life
That makes me ugly; and besides, the Moor
May unfold me to him—there stand I in much peril.
No, he must die. But soft, I hear him coming. ( 5.1, 11-22)
 

This quote demonstrates that Iago is planning for the death of both Cassio and Roderigo. Also, he is thinking about what will happen if they lived and why do they have to die. This quote is important because it shows Iago's villainy and how he planned everything without getting himself in trouble

"An abundance of forces conspired to keep women in their place"
- Joseph Papp and Elizabeth Kirkland
"But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence."
-St Paul
Relationship Status: Married
Relationship Status: Single
The only feasible alternative to marriage was domestic service (marriage highly desirable) for example line 76 page 122:




Frowned upon in society she would have been an easy scapegoat for Iogo: Lines 85 on page 122
"Gentlemen all, I do suspect this trash To be a party in this injury" -Iago
"0, my dear Cassio, my sweet Cassio!" -Bianca
"O, fie upon thee, strumpet! -Emilia
Mary Wollstonecraft and her views on "marriage is a legalized form of prostitution" -from her book
A Vindication of the Rights of Woman
Social Issue
HUMAN TRAFFICKING
Approximately 2 billion people are forced into labor including sexual exploitation
161 countries effected
Majority of victims between 18-24
About 1 million children
43% of victims are victims for
forced commercial exploitation
98% of which are female
Thank you for listening :D
Full transcript