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Seasons

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by

Trevor Hawkins

on 11 January 2013

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Transcript of Seasons

Seasons Rotation and revolution Rotation is when the world spins on the axis. This is what causes day and night. A revolution is when the sun moves around the earth.
This is what causes seasons and years to change over time. hsmagazine.net hidayaresearch.com Direct and indirect sunlight Direct sunlight is when the suns light hits your side of the earth more forcefully. This means you are in summer. Indirect sunlight is when your side of the earth is hit less forcefully. This means you are in winter. When the sun is hitting both hemisphere with the same force means its either spring or fall. Earth's tilt Earth has a 23.5 degree tilt. newbedford.k12.ma.us geospatial.gsu.edu North and south hemisphere The north hemisphere is the top half of earth. The south hemisphere is the bottom half of the earth. When its summer in the north hemisphere its winter in the south. Equinoxes and solstices An equinox occurs twice a year (around 20 March and 22 September), when the tilt of the Earth's axis is inclined neither away from nor towards the Sun, the center of the Sun being in the same plane as the Earth's equator. A solstice is an astronomical event that occurs twice each year as the Sun reaches its highest or lowest excursion relative to the celestial equator on the celestial sphere. perceptions.couk.com
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