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FLVS WH 4.09

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Nick Mathies

on 1 February 2013

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Transcript of FLVS WH 4.09

Itinerary for Europe Paris (France) Must see Places! The Eiffel Tower The Eiffel Tower in Paris in one of Paris' most distinct symbol. It was the worlds tallest building until New York Empire State building passed it. Despite its appearance, it weighs 10,100 metric tons and engineer Gustave Eiffel’s construction was so sound that it never ways more than 9 cm in strong winds. Sacre-Coeur The Sacre-Coeur is one of the most photographed building in Paris. It took 46 years to build and was finished in 1923. Most people try to visit here during the sunset for the most beautiful view. Arc de Triomphe The Arc de Triomphe was built to honor Napoleons victory. You will see most people here on December 2 in honor of that. Work began on the arch in 1806 but they did not finish until 1836. Today the arch is used for many public events. French Renaissance The French Renaissance was the cultural and artistic movement in France between the fifteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Some of the noticeable developments during the French Renaissance was the spread of humanism, the exploration of the New-World, architecture, painting, sculpture, music, and sciences. Madrid Spain Top Three Places to Visit Museo del Prado El Parque del Buen Retiro Plaza Mayor This art museum houses works by Spain’s most famous classical artists, including Goya, El Greco, and Velazquez. Unfortunately, this museum is not free all the time, but it is free on weekdays from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., and also on Saturday and Sunday evenings. The El Parque del Buen Retiro is easy to access because it is practically right in the middle of the city next to some of Madrid's other attractions. This is the place to go to get a taste of some local culture. This is the central square in Madrid. The city is literally packed with atmospheric plazas that people use as social gathering places, but Mayor is the largest and most centrally located one. Spanish Renaissance The beginning of the Renaissance in Spain is closely linked to the historical-political life of the monarchy of the Catholic Monarchs. The Renaissance here goes from painting and sculptures, to Architecture and Literature. London England Top Three Places to Visit London Eye Big Ben British Museum Ride the most popular, not free, attraction in London, the London Eye. The world’s tallest observation wheel (there really can’t be that many) reaches about 443 feet and provides views of up to about 25 miles. Open every day and free is a hard deal to find in Europe but you’ll be in luck if you head over to the British Museum. Housing one of the largest collections of art and artifacts from human history and culture, the museum has been around since 1759. With its first tick in 1859 the clock laid into the north end tower of the Palace at Westminster, Big Ben began its career as a national landmark. Although the name Big Ben actually just refers to the Clock and not the tower, the nomenclature has become so common place most locals won’t laugh in your face if you ask where “Big Ben” is today. Rome Italy Top Three Places to Visit The Colosseum of Rome The Pantheon Roman Forum Ancient Rome's huge ampitheater, holding up to 55,000 people, was built by Emperor Vespasian in AD 80 and was the scene of many deadly gladiatorial and wild animal fights. Today you may see men dressed in gladiatorial costume as you walk between the Colosseum and the nearby Arch of Constantine, built in AD 315. Rome's Pantheon, the temple of all the gods, was built between AD 118-125 by Emperor Hadrian. In the 7th century it was made into a church by early Christians and now is lined with tombs. Go inside to see the spectacular dome. Admission is free. The ancient Roman Forum is a huge complex of ruined temples, basilicas, and arches. It was the ceremonial, legal, social, and business center of ancient Rome. To get a good view, walk up the Capitoline Hill behind the museums. Give yourself at least 2 hours to wander around. Venice Italy Top Three Places to Visit Saint Mark’s Square Rialto Bridge Zaterre This huge public space is the heart of Venice. It is so well known that tourists and locals alike often refer to it simply as The Piazza, even though there are many other piazzas in Venice. The square is lined with beautiful and historic buildings including St. Mark’s Basilica, the Clock-tower and Procuratie Vecchie, a long multistorey building with arch-like windows. Another popular photo subject for visitors is the flock of pigeons that inhabits the square. This historic bridge spans the Grand Canal, which is the central waterway in Venice. Built in the 16th Century, it is an attraction in and of itself, though most people come to the bridge because it offers picture-worthy views of the canal and the historic buildings that line it. Rialto has been an important retail district for over 1,000 years. Produce and fish markets still operate in the area near the bridge today, just as they have for hundreds and hundreds of years. This wide waterfront promenade area is located in the Dorsoduro District, which is a mainly residential area outside of Central Venice. The eateries and cafes make Zaterre a good place to send an evening, and the views are as good as any other waterfront spot in Venice. But Zaterre is much less crowded than more touristy stretches of waterfront. That makes it ideal for those looking for the real Venice rather than the city that is usually presented to tourists.
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