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1.1.3 Demonstrative pronouns.

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by

Luisa Camacho

on 13 April 2015

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Transcript of 1.1.3 Demonstrative pronouns.

Demonstrative Pronouns.
"
This
" (
singular
) and "
These
" (
plural
) refer to an object or person NEAR the speaker.

"
That
" (
singular
) and "
Those
" (
plural
) refer to an object or person further AWAY.

Examples.
These
are unbelievable.

In this example, "
these
" can refer to some objects close in space or in time to the speaker.

Those
are unbelievable.

In this example, "
those
" can refer to some objects farther in space or in time to the speaker.

Definition.
Demonstrative pronouns are pronouns that point to specific things.

"
This
,
that
,
these
,
those
,
none
and
neither.
"

Them are demonstrative pronouns that substitute
nouns,
when the nouns are replaced can be understood from the context.


Examples.
This
is unbelievable.

In this example, "
this
" can refer to an object or situation close in space or in time to the speaker.

That
is unbelievable.

In this example, "
that
" can refer to an object or situation farther in space or in time to the speaker.

1.1.3 Demonstrative pronouns.
Position.
Before the noun.

Before the word 'one'.

Before an adjective + noun.

Alone when the noun is 'understood'

Examples.
Who owns
that
house? (distant - physical )

Is
this
John's house? (near - physical )

That's
nothing to do with me... (distant - psychological )

This
is a nice surprise! (near - psychological )

At the same time, It indicates whether they are close or far, in space or time, from the speaker in the moment of speaking.

They also indicate whether they are replacing singular or plural words.

Some grammars describe them as members of the class of function words called "determiners", since they identify nouns and other nominal.
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