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Tattoo Discrimination in the Workplace

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on 21 August 2013

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Transcript of Tattoo Discrimination in the Workplace

Tattoo Discrimination in the Workplace
Did you know?
In a recent survey conducted by the San Francisco Chronicle, only 4% of people with tattoos reported having faced discrimination [from prospective employers] because of their tattoos

39% of those surveyed – believe employees with tattoos and piercings reflect poorly on their employers.
Qualified people are missing out on jobs because of this discrimination, and employers are missing out on potentially valuable employees.

According to Bank of America Spokeswoman Ferris Morrison, Bank of America has no written rules or restrictions when it comes to inked corporate employees. “We have no formal policy about tattoos because we value our differences and recognize that diversity and inclusion are good for our business and make our company stronger,” she said.
Basically, the more educated you are the less likely you are to have or condone tattoos or piercings.
- Aaron Guoveia 2013
No Protection
There are no laws protecting people with tattoos against discrimination when it comes to employment.
Where do we draw the line?
According to an article on FoxNew.com we are probably 10 years away from this discrimination becoming more or less extinct. It's all up to our generation.
Full transcript