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Scatter Flowers

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by

India Shackleford

on 7 March 2016

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Transcript of Scatter Flowers

Scatter Flowers
Isolation
People "slide past to avoid her."
Dixon's staccato sentences immediately draw attention
J. Dixon
Created by India Shackleford
Allegory:
"Scatter Flowers" raises the key issue of society's behaviour towards the marginalised.
Others "look down at their books that they're not actually reading, pretending not to notice her."
"No one notices and no one cares."
The author's contention is a problem inherent in society - she is addressing the general public.
All people deserve respect and compassion
Discrediting with Rhetorical Questions
Is the character
really
happy, living out her life as an outcast, shunned and ignored by all?
e.g. "She won't," and "She soon escapes."
Longer and more descriptive sentences emphasise emotional parts of the text
e.g. "Withdraws a handful of small brownish black seeds and proceeds to throw them onto the speeding ground."
Contrast in sentence length captures attention and gives the impression of a moving train
Presented as a sympathetic and intriguing character
Emotional Appeal
“For a split second, she is one of them not the outsider she has always been.”
Flowers & Seeds as

“A
weed
they call them now, a
weed
they called her then.”
Symbols & Metaphors
Yellow
Unresolved ending
?
Captivating & moving story
Narrator voices their opinions, portraying the old women positively and the general public negatively
Adds a sense of mystery
Tense & Tone
Present tense is employed, making the story seem like it is unfolding now
A weary and poignant tone is utilised
Narration
Told in third person by an omniscient watcher
Sentence Structure
Vivid Description
“Tired old hands, skin pale and mottled, fingers swollen and gnarled.”
Persuading readers that all human beings deserve to be treated with empathy
• The
“weeds”
that the old lady plants are utilised by Dixon as symbol of all that is considered “unwanted” and “imperfect” in society
• They are a
constant reminder
of her presence to other characters
• The plants make the general public feel guilty about their behaviour towards the elderly lady and other “misfits”
“People wanted to be rid of her, and now people want to get rid of her flowers.”
There will always be individuals who are shunned in our community.
Image Bibliography:
Alone n.d., Photograph, Indulgy, accessed 6 March 2016, <https://www.pinterest.com/bsark1010/history/>.

Inclusive Education 2012, Digital Art, Best Practice Autism.com, accessed 6 March 2016, <http://bestpracticeautism.blogspot.com.au/2012/12/autism-and-inclusive-education.html>.

Field Flowers Yellow n.d., Photograph, Themes.com, accessed 4 March 2016, <http://7-themes.com/6946651-field-flowers-yellow.html>.

Fizzyjinks, 2011, Scattering Seeds, Digital Painting, accessed 6 March 2016, <http://fizzyjinks.deviantart.com/art/Scattering-Seeds-264453014>.

Overground train arriving at station n.d., Photograph, Transport for London, accessed 6 March 2016, <http://www.visitlondon.com/traveller-information/getting-around-london/local-trains-in-london>.

Weeds n.d., Photograph, Organic Gardening, accessed 6 March 2016, <http://lifescapecolorado.com/tag/killing-weeds/>.
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