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"Anthem for Doomed Youth"

- Wilfred Owen
by

Faduma Ibrahim

on 21 March 2013

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Transcript of "Anthem for Doomed Youth"

"Anthem for Doomed Youth" -Wilfred Owen (1893-1918) Wilfred Owen portrays his sadness and disgust for the loss of life in WW1 through his poem, "Anthem of Doomed Youth". What happens? m in theme The poet is trying to communicate the fact that dead soldiers are not getting the proper burials and the respect that they deserve for losing their lives fighting in war, only being treated like cows who are slaughtered. "Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle" alliteration Wilfred Owen uses alliteration here to make the readers hear the rattling within the poem. "What passing bells for these who dies as cattle?" metaphor Wilfred Owen is comparing the young soldiers to cattles to show that they weren't getting much respect. It is a short poem, with only two stanzas. The rhyme pattern is "ABABCDCDEFFEGG". Each stanza starts with a question and within the 14 lines he conveys the violent imagery in WW1. FEELINGS & ATTITUDES This poem is very powerful, because it has a deep meaning and it gives a feeling of sadness especially when the poet compares the brave soldiers' death to a cows. This shows that the posters saying that "you are wanted" is only true before the soldiers' deaths, as Owen describes through his poem that soldiers are clearly unwanted after their lives are lost. This poem is a little different from other poems that Wilfred Owen has written, because although the poem is about World War I, "Anthem for Doomed Youth" describes the truth, realism and cruelty of war that the poet discovered as he viewed his fellow soldiers' deaths, whereas in other poems like "Dulce et Decorum est," Owen mainly writes about suffering soldiers. Speaker and Mood The speaker is an older person looking down on the youth and the poem describe the person by saying "What passing-Bells for these who die as cattle?"which clearly shows that the speaker in the poem is older and grown The mood is sad and a putter down because it says " Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs" by for the young and it puts you down. Setting The setting of this poem is a dark, dreary, hopeless place where the youth have no future. This makes the mood of the poem even darker, this shows when the poet says that there are "no prayers; nor bells (line 5)." Another example that adds depth to the hopeless mood is example "only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle can patter out their hasty orisons" (line 4). What this line is saying is that the only way to solve their prayers is through guns. Figurative Language The first line of the poem describes the "doomed youth" as "dying cattle." The simile is showing how the deaths of the soldiers are just like cattle, slaughter without any feeling of regret or remorse. This pertains to the youth because they are going to be raised by having very little feelings towards their enemies. Sensory Language This poem is very appealing to the visual part of the sensory language. You can feel this as the speaker repeats words like guns (line 2) and rifle (line 3) that make you visualize a war. It adds depth to the morale of the poem which is war will make the youths have a doomed future. when the poets mentions bells (line 5), it makes the reader hear some type of hope, but when that is thought of with mourning and prayers it making the feeling change from hopefulness to hopelessness. The poem is about war and the victims of war. (First World War)During that war, the most soldiers were young men, the youth.So the title refers to the youth that is uncertain of their survival through the day. The word "doomed" raises the stakes right away, wouldn't you say? It alerts us to the fact that this poem is going into some heavy territory and is ready to face it head on. "Youth" is also very direct, highlighting how the young soldiers are the ones who are doomed and dying, while also suggesting something of the immaturity of the enthusiasm and eagerness to fight. Anthem For Doomed Youth Title Analysis So lets start with the title. Does anyone know what it means, what its trying to say? THE END ASC
Welcome To Our Presentation About The Poem "Anthem For Doomed Youth" written by Wilfred Owen What passing-bells for these who die as cattle? Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle Can patter out their hasty orisons.
No mockeries now for them;
no prayers nor bells;
Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, –
The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;
And bugles calling for them from sad shires.
What candles may be held to speed them all?
Not in the hands of boys but in their eyes Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.
The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall;
Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds, And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds Here's The Poem Itself... What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle
Can patter out their hasty orisons.
No mockeries now for them;
no prayers nor bells;
Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs, –
The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;
And bugles calling for them from sad shires.
What candles may be held to speed them all?
Not in the hands of boys but in their eyes
Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.
The pallor of girls' brows shall be their pall;
Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds Here's The Poem Itself... Done By:
Faduma, Hafsa E, Hafsa S, Jasmin & Maisha
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