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THE SCARLET LETTER: CHAPTER 9, THE LEECH

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Suzanne Danial

on 21 October 2013

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Transcript of THE SCARLET LETTER: CHAPTER 9, THE LEECH

THE LEECH
DATE:10/20/13
CREATED BY: SUZANNE DANIAL
ENGLISH III AP 1314-5
Chapter in Regards to Novel
In regards to the novel, chapter 9 sets out to prepare the reader for upcoming events in the actions of Dimmesdale. Chapter 9 demonstrates the weakening and breaking of Dimmesdale, which is to come in later chapters. The Leech in regards to the novel reveals Chillingworth's true intentions and future plans to further ruin Hester's reputation and Dimmesdale's. This chapter advances the plot of the novel by exposing early on the upcoming events in later chapters which reveal the other adulterer to the town and ruin Dimmesdale's life, as Dimmesdale ruined Chillingworth's life by taking what was dear to him: his wife's fidelity.
How Ch. 9 follows
Chapter 9 follows the previous chapters by indirectly(to the unrelated characters) tying previous incidents, like Dimmesdale's influence on the decision to not take Pearl from her mother or why it is the reverend is acting so peculiar, together so that the reader can see what the townspeople couldn't.
Hawthorne also uses a metaphor when saying Dimmesdale i s haunted ny the devil, which he later says is in the disguise of Chillingworth. This is in regards to complete change of Chillingworth's physiognomy.
PLAN 3
HAWTHORNE AND TRANSCENDENTALISM
Hawthorne's struggle with transcendentalism is actually portrayed in a direct quote from this chapter. "Not the less, however, though with a tremulous enjoyment, did he feel the occasional relief of looking at the universe through the medium of another kind of intellect than those with which he habitually held converse." Here Dimmesdale is established as a man of religion, with thoughts of someone who might believe in a higher power, but one who's life is based on the individual.
Civil disobedience is shown through this because it goes against Puritan ideals, which follow the guidelines of conformity.
Hawthorne's struggle is shown through self-reliance where in this case he is not afraid to be different: he is not afraid to have a different view from those around him. Hawthorne does not reject the existence of God, but prefers to explain the individual and the world through the terms of himself- an individual.
Hawthorne also shows his personal opinion on how he views things, it can be assumed that his thoughts were portrayed through Dimmesdale. He's a man of religion but he wonders about the universe through a different state of mind.
works cited
Transcendentalism ppt 1 (ppt file - 8.90 MB)
SL project research

Transcendentalism ppt 2 (ppt file - 954 KB)
SL project research

Transcendentalism ppt 4 (ppt file - 492 KB)
SL project research

The Scarlet Letter-Nathaniel Hawthorne
EXECUTION
RESULTS
Hawthorne also uses irony in the chapter to portray the lies which happen to be that he's an actual physician and that he is skilled, kind, and friendly.
SUCCESS?
SUCCESS?
YES!
YES!
YES!
NO!
NO!
NO!
WHAT NOW?
SUMMARY
RESULTS
SOLVED PROBLEMS
REMAINING PROBLEMS
NEW CHALLENGES
Hawthorne uses symbolism by having Dimmesdale put his hand to his chest which happens to be where Hester's 'A' is located. This symbolizes his guilt and the point in the story where he owns up or accepts his actions.
Civil Disobedience
In Chapter 9, civil disobedience is showed through Dimmesdale's first refusal of medical attention which makes the church question if he wants to die or not. Chillingworth also demonstrates civil disobedience by further sickening the reverend and his attempts to squeeze information out of Dimmesdale.
Self-reliance
Ch. 9 shows self-reliance by demonstrating simplicity through the way Chillingworth tries to "cure" Dimmesdale. He relies completely on nature to help him with his self-proclaimed task. Chillingworth is doing what concerns himself, which is an ideal of transcendentalism. Chillingworth seeks the truth of the world through nature.
God in Nature
God in nature is portrayed in Ch. 9 through Chillingworth and Dimmesdale venturing out looking for plants with healing balm in them. The healing would be a miracle of God. Also Romantic sensibilities are shown when they take long walks on the sea shore and in the forest, where nature connects body and soul, in association to nature and romanticism- ideals of transcendentalism. Nature offers gifts if you open up to it, in this case, hopes are the gift is health, which would reflect God and his gifts through nature.
How Transcendentalism Ties In
Transcendentalism teaches that the universe is just the structure of the individual. Transcendentalism is based on self knowledge, becoming one with nature, and keeping one's sense of distinguished or unique aspects. Transcendentalism is the explanation of an individual and the world through the terms of the individual. I will discuss civil disobedience, the reflection of God through nature, and self-reliance. Hawthorne tries to deal with civil disobedience by making the characters (Dimmesdale and Chillingworth) act out in ways unacceptable by their community. He also tries to deal with the reflection of God through nature by having Dimmesdale and Chillingworth venture through the woods and on the beach in order to help the reverend's health which would have to be considered to be aided by the will or help of God. Hawthorne also tries to deal with self-reliance by having Chillingworth rely on himself to fulfill his intentions of his revenge no matter the cost.
PLOT
The Leech is about Reverend Dimmesdale and his struggle with his guilt which is consuming his health and progressively making him more emaciated. Demonstrated through pure and genuine concern for the reverend, Chillingworth convinces the head of the church to allow him to move in with Dimmesdale to reestablish health within him. Chillingworth and Dimmesdale move in together so Dimmesdale can have restored health, but the main reason Chillingworth wanted to take care of Dimmesdale was to pick apart all aspects of his personal life, may it be secrets or interests. Chillingworth is poisoning Dimmesdale in hopes of breaking him and exposing the truth. Through Chillingworth's physiognomy, townspeople and Dimmesdale start to notice he's up to no good.

THE SCARLET LETTER: CHAPTER 9, THE LEECH
Ch. 9 helps the correlation of previous and upcoming events come together. It foreshadows the revealing of the secret Dimmesdale and Hester withhold and even the fate of Dimmesdale by the end of the book.
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