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Theme Analysis

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Heather Arlia

on 27 March 2017

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Transcript of Theme Analysis

Scene Analysis
By: Heather Arlia

Theme
The theme that I have chosen is war. This is a theme evident throughout reading the books Lysistrata, the Iliad, and Le Morte D'Arthur.
Lysistrata
Magistrate:
This is a war fund, you stupid woman! A war fund, get it?
Lysistrata:
And that’s exactly our first goal: No more war!
Magistrate:
No war? No war? How on earth are we going to protect ourselves without war?
Lysistrata:
We’ll protect you! No need for war!
Magistrate:
You lot? Huh!
Lysistrata: Swinging her bum lasciviously.
Yes, just little ol’ us! We, the women!
Magistrate:
Savagery!
Lysistrata:
We’ll save you, Mister Magistrate, sir! Whether you like it or not!
Quote #1 Reasoning
Quote #2
Quote #2 Reasoning
Quote # 3
Lysistrata: Ignoring the interruption
…and secondly, we women, have every right to be enjoying the prime of our life – which is now! But because of all these campaigns of yours, we all go to bed alone these days. And it’s not only us who are suffering but our daughters, too, whose prime is passing them by even faster. They’re in there, in their rooms, totally alone.
Magistrate:
And don’t men get old, too?
Lysistrata:
You think it’s the same? When a man comes back from his battle, even if he’s old and grey, he can still find a fuck, whereas a woman’s prime races by and if no one grabs it, she’ll never get a fuck! So, the poor thing just sits there, in her room, all alone, reading marriage omens!
Magistrate:
Well, yes, if a man can still get it up…
Lysistrata: This time she interrupts him angrily.
War suffering! Bah! You obviously know nothing about real suffering, so… so why don’t you just drop dead, hey?
Quote #3 Reasoning
In my opinion this is the real reason why the women want to stop the war. They believe that a man can do whatever he wants no matter his age, but a woman is limited by her age. The entire reason they wish to end the war is for their own self gain. This shows that a war is not good for women and that they wish to be in peace at all possible times.
Great Books to 1700
Quote #1
Lines 488-496
Lysistrata:
Exactly! That’s exactly the stuff by which I’m planning to save Greece, darling! With the scents and the make-up and the flowers and those cute little “fuck-me-please-I’m-cute” slippers and the dainty little see-through gowns!
Caloniki:
What? What on earth could you achieve with that stuff?
Lysistrata:
Peace, my dear! Peace among men! No longer will a man thrust his spear against another man!
Caloniki:
Is that right? Well then, if that’s the case I’m off to powder my nose right now…
Lysistrata:
Nor will he raise a shield in front of him…
Caloniki:
Mmm… and to put on my see-through…
Lysistrata:
Nor will he ever carry a sword…
Lines 46-52
Lines 592-598
The Iliad
Quote #1
Tall Hektor of the glancing helm answered him: "Aias,
son of Telamon, seed of Zeus, o lord of the people,
do not be testing me as if I were some ineffectual
boy, or a woman, who knows nothing of the works of warfare.
I know well myself how to fight and kill men in battle;
I know how to turn to the right, how to turn to the left the ox-hide
tanned into a shield which is my protection in battle;
I know how to storm my way into the struggle of flying horses;
I know how to tread my measures on the grim floor of the war god.
Book 7 lines 233-241
Quote #1 Reasoning
Quote #2
Quote #3
Quote #3 Reasoning
Le Morte d'Arthur
Quote #1
Quote #1 Reasoning
Quote #2 Reasoning
Quote #2
Quote #2 Reasoning
Quote #3
Quote #3 Reasoning
Now the sun of a new day struck on the ploughlands, rising
out of the quiet water and the deep stream of the ocean
to climb the sky. The Trojans assembled together. They found
it hard to recognize each individual dead man;
but with water they washed away the blood that was on them
and as they wept warm tears they lifted them on to the wagons.
But great Priam would not let them cry out; and in silence
they piled the bodies upon the pyre, with their hearts in sorrow,
and burned them upon the fire, and went back to sacred Ilion.
In the same way on the other side the strong-greaved Achaians
piled their own slain upon the pyre, with their hearts in sorrow,
and burned them upon the fire, and went-back to their hollow vessels.
Book7 Lines 421-432
Sing, Goddess, Achilles’ rage,
Black and murderous, that cost the Greeks
Incalculable pain, pitched countless souls
Of heroes into Hades’ dark,
And left their bodies to rot as feasts
For dogs and birds, as Zeus’ will was done.
Begin with the clash between Agamemnon--
The Greek warlord--and godlike Achilles.
Book 1 Lines 1-8
Alas, that ever I bare crown upon my head! For now have I lost the fairest fellowship of noble knights that ever held Christian king together. Alas, my good knights be slain away from me: now within these two days I have lost forty knights, and also the noble fellowship of Sir Launcelot and his blood, for now I may never hold them together no more with my worship. Alas that ever this war began.
Lines 881-882
Tide me death, betide me life, now I see him yonder alone he shall never escape mine hands, for at a better avail shall I never have him
Line 932
Nay, I may not so, for I have promised to do the battle to the uttermost by the faith of my body, while me lasteth the life, and therefore I had liefer to die with honour than to live with shame; and if it were possible for me to die an hundred times, I had liefer to die so oft than yield me to thee; for though I lack weapon, I shall lack no worship, and if thou slay me weaponless that shall be thy shame.
In this quote the women believe that they have found a way to end the war, buy withholding sex from the men. This is a very interesting idea because typically the women stay out of war because it is a mans place, but not in this story. After they have figured out that they could stop the war they made their plan come to life. Eventually the war is ended. This shows that men may be good at fighting in a war but women could have the brains behind the war front.
The women believe that they can stop the war faster by controlling the money. If the men do not have the money then they can not afford the war. This is actually a very brilliant idea because this is very true, you must have money to be in a war.
This is a very interesting quote. This is when Hector is telling Aias that his skill in life is being able to do all of these things. These things essentially are acts of warfare, Hector is saying that his skill in life is war. Just like a doctor's skill in life is the knowledge and ability to heal.
This is a quote that shows war is not just a game to men. During the act of war a man will feel exasperated and possibly joy from the adrenalin. Soon after the war, when they are collecting the dead they feel sorrow for those who died. In this case both of the Achaians and the Trojans feel the same war. While war is not always right, it can bring humanity to some. War can connect people and this quote shows that.
This quote in my opinion is a major quote for the story. Homer is stating in these lines that it is because of Achilles that all of those men died. He blames it all on one person but is that really fair? Everyone had a part in the war but Homer might possible be saying that because of Achilles rage more people died. His feelings such as anger and desire for revenge were the death of others. So maybe Achilles weakness is his emotions.
This is when Arthur realizes that the peaceful days of his kingdom is over. He also believe that the knights of the round table would be coming to an end. This is when Arthur realized that war was enviable. This is an enormous thing because Arthur did not want war, he only wanted a peaceful kingdom. This is when we realize that war destroys.
This is when Arthur is preparing to attack Mordred at the Battle of Salisbury even thought he knows it means his death. He is driven by honor for his knights to fight, but with his death is also the death of loyalty and chivalry. War has killed what Arthur was for.
Here is when Arthur will not yield in a fight, even though he is weaponless. He would rather die then yeild in a fight. Luckily he is saved in time.
War is intresting thing, it never yeilds the same result. In Lysistrata it brings knowledge and wisdom to the women. In the Illiad it brings about humanilty while in Le Morte D'Arthur it brings about distroction of all
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