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Melodies, Counterpoint

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by

Brian Coffill

on 19 March 2013

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Transcript of Melodies, Counterpoint

Triads (Root) M3 M3 (Third) (Fifth) (Root) (Third) M3 m3 (Fifth) 1. M3+M3 Augmented (+) Major (M) 2. M3+m3 3. m3+M3 minor (m) 4. m3+m3 diminished ( ) (Third) (Fifth) M3 m3 (Root) (Fifth) (Third) m3 m3 (Root) o Warm-Up:
-Write out Diatonic 7ths in EbM
- Determine Diatonic 7ths in ebm

Class:
- Writing Melodies
- Writing in 4 parts

Homework:
Compose 2 melodies on Noteflight (1 major, 1 minor), email to centurymusictheory
@gmail.com Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, "Swan Lake" (Third) Major 7 (M7) (Root) M3 m3 1. M triad + M7 (Fifth) (Over the root) (Seventh) Interval of Major 7th above the root Interval of minor 7th above the root (Over the root) (Third) M3 (Root) (Seventh) Major-minor 7 (Mm7) 2. M triad + m7 (Fifth) m3 (Root) M3 3. m triad + m7 (Over the root) Interval of minor 7th above the root (Fifth) (Third) minor 7 (m7) m3 4. dim triad + m7 (Over the root) (Root) Interval of minor 7th above the root (Seventh) m3 m3 (Third) (Fifth) half-diminished 7 ( 7) o / diminished 7 ( 7) AP Music Theory March 19, 2013 I ii iii IV V vi vii o m3 o (Seventh) (Fifth) (Third) Interval of diminished 7th above the root 5. dim triad + dim7 m3 (Root) (Over the root) o o Diatonic Major pattern Diatonic minor pattern i ii III iv V VI VII vii o o I ii iii IV V vi vii Diatonic Major pattern M7 7 7 M7 7 7 o 7 Triads + 7th over the root 7th Chords (Seventh) i ii III iv V VI vii Diatonic minor pattern 7 0 7 M7 7 7 M7 o 7 / What's the diatonic minor 7th pattern? Counterpoint Basic Rules for Writing Melodies 1. Stay in the key/scale being used 2. Begin and end on the tonic 3. Use only rhythms of one beat or greater 4. Use only conjunct motion a.k.a. "Stepwise" ...not to be confused with Disjunct. ...let's start on a treble clef in the key of G Major 3 4 4 5
4 4 2 8 We're going to start simple and stick to 4
4 Keep this in mind: You can't get here... ...without starting here. Put the rules to use! (2 on the board) Put the rules to use! 3. Use only rhythms of one beat or greater "Step I" Rules for Writing Melodies 2. Begin and end on the tonic Error Detection 4. Use only conjunct motion 1. Stay in the key/scale being used Conjunct and 3rds "Step II" Rules for Writing Melodies 1. Stay in the key/scale being used 2. Begin and end on the tonic Conjunct and 3rds 3. Use only rhythms of one beat or greater 4. Use primarily conjunct motion - The last note must begin on a strong beat 5. The melody can have only one Focal Point The highest peak in the melody - The last tonic must be approached by step Write a melody as a class using these rules ...and now split up into partners John Coltrane, Giant Steps AP Music Theory Warm-Up:
On a bass clef, write the following in AM:
I - IV - V - I

Class:
Melodic Modification

Homework: October 28, 2010 Courtesy of Steve Haring 1. Stay in the key/scale being used 3. Use only rhythms of one beat or greater "Step II" Rules for Writing Melodies 5. The melody can have only one Focal Point 4. Use primarily conjunct motion Mostly conjunct, with a few 3rds - The final tonic must begin on a strong beat 2. Begin and end on the tonic - The final tonic must be approached by step 4
2 6 6
4 AM: I IV V I 6
4 4
2 6 Review: Let's take a look at some homework... Eric Chris S. Mya Melodic Modification Extending a musical idea by altering a melody in a defined manner How has the original melody been altered to create the second? The second example doubled the length of each note in the first example Quarter Notes double... ... to become Half Notes Half Notes double... ... to become Whole Notes 1. Augmentation Doubling the duration of each note in an example 1.

2. 1 beat becomes 2, 2 beats become 4, 1/2 beat becomes 1 beat, etc. Try it as a class... 1 measure melody Try it on your own 1 measure melody solution - Write a 2 measure melody

- Alter it by augmentation, diminution, retrograde, inversion

- Email to yorktownmusictheory
@gmail.com Half notes are cut in half... Try it as a class... solution 2. Diminution 1 measure melody The second example cut the length of each note in half 1.

2. 1 measure melody 1 beat becomes 1/2, 2 beats become 1, 4 beats become 2, etc. Quarter Notes are cut in half... ... to become Eighth Notes ... to become Quarter Notes Cutting the duration of each note in half Try it on your own How has the original melody been altered to create the second? Reversing the order that notes appear, while maintaining the duration How has the original melody been altered to create the second? 1.

2. The second example reversed the order of notes in the first example 1 measure melody The first note becomes the last note, the second note becomes the second-to-last note, etc. Try it on your own 3. Retrograde 1 measure melody Try it as a class... solution Try it as a class... Quarter Notes double... Try it on your own 1 measure melody Reversing the melodic intervals in a series of notes The second example inverted the melodic intervals between each note ... to become Half Notes 4. Melodic Inversion How has the original melody been altered to create the second? Up a M2 becomes down a M2, up a M3 becomes down a M3, etc. solution Half Notes double... 1.

2. 1 measure melody ... to become Whole Notes diminution Prevalent in Baroque music, especially fugues. retrograde Inversion Review: We Covered 4 Forms of
Melodic Modification: - Augmentation
- Diminution - Retrograde
- Melodic Inversion Doubling the length of each note Cutting the length of each note in half Reversing the order that notes appear Reversing the melodic intervals Johann Sebastian Bach
(March 21, 1685 - 1750)
Cello Suite No. 1, BWV 1007
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