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flip-flop: pro/anti Welfare State debate

Here are some suggestions for the flip-flop debate for you to follow
by

Stuart Mitchell

on 20 January 2012

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Transcript of flip-flop: pro/anti Welfare State debate

Argument For
Argument
Against

but the powers that we give the Welfare State mean that they can make people carry out certain tasks before they give them their benefits
but there are so many people on benefits that they are not able to check whether people are eligible or not
there may be holes in the system, but you must admit that it has eradicated many of the FIVE GIANTS
Argument For
the Welfare State provides everything for everybody including the sick, the unemployed and the elderly.
Argument
Against
yes, but it provides for those who can't be bothered to work as well
Argument


Against

it has applied a plaster where major surgery is required, another way of fixing society is needed
Flip-Flop

The Welfare State
how to argue in sociology...
essentially, you are arguing
with yourself...
Begin with statement one
and move around the circle,
changing your point of view
each time the bell goes...
PING
and stop...
and again...
Argument For
for
for
for
against
against
against
An argument is a connected series of statements to establish a definite proposition.
no it isn't.
Full transcript