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Sonnet 18

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Preethi Raju

on 27 February 2014

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Transcript of Sonnet 18

Sonnet 18

Paraphrase
Rhyme Scheme
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
Theme
* The major theme of sonnet 18 is immortalizing the speaker's lover and the lover's beauty.


Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more
temperate
:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot
the eye of heaven
shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And
every fair from fair sometime declines
,
By chance, or
nature's changing course
, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of
that fair thou ow'st
;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in
eternal lines to time thou grow'st
;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

SOAPS
Speaker: The speaker is a man in love.
Occasion: The speaker is proving his love to his lover.
Audience: The audience is the speaker's lover.
Purpose: The purpose is to make his lover's beauty and his love for her eternal.
Subject: The speaker is proving his love for his lover.

Shall I compare you to a summer's day?
You are more lovely and more constant:
Rough winds shake the beloved buds of May
And summer is far too short:
At times the sun is too hot,
Or often goes behind the clouds;
And everything beautiful sometime will lose its beauty,
By misfortune or by nature's planned out course.
But your youth shall not fade,
Nor will you lose the beauty that you possess;
Nor will death claim you for his own,
Because in my eternal verse you will live forever.
So long as there are people on this earth,
So long will this poem live on, making you immortal.
A
B
A
B

C
D
C
D

E
F
E
F

GG
Iambic Pentameter
da-
DUM
-da-
DUM
-da-
DUM
-da-
DUM
-da-
DUM
Context
* The sonnets are different from the plays, but they do contain dramatic elements and a sense of story.
* Each poem deals with a highly personal theme, and each can be taken on its own or in relation to the poems around it.
* The first 126 of the sonnets seem to be addressed to an unnamed young nobleman, whom the speaker loves very much.



 

Structure


*The sonnet is arranged by three quatrains, which have four line, and a couplet.
*The main problem is posed in the first two quatrains. The problem is how best to immortalize the speaker's lover.
*The problem is answered in the last quatrain. The solution is to immortalize his love for all time in "eternal lines" (12).
*The tone of the poem shifts in the third quatrain. *Here Shakespeare switches from bashing the summer to describing the immortality of the beloved.
*A rhyming couplet at the end wraps up the poem.



*This sonnet is basically a debate about the immortality of beauty and how to best express this concept.
*The speaker finds that poetic expression is the best way of eternalizing his love's beauty.
*Sound devices, figurative language, and the Shakespearean style of the sonnet act as the vehicle through which the speaker voices his solution.
Conclusion
Maria Gavino
Preethi Raju
Meagan Ramos


*The speaker believes that he has come up with an effective time machine: poetry.
*The speaker cannot stop thinking about how everything in life is temporary and fleeting.
*The speaker believes that he can save his beloved from the ravages of time by artistically representing his beloved.
*Man, in the natural world, can’t avoid being subject to time, but it is through literature, the poet argues, that he can free himself.


Minor Theme
shall
I
com
PARE
thee
TO
a
SUM
mer's
DAY
?
Thou
ART
more
LOVE
ly
AND
more
TEM
per
ATE
:
Rough
WINDS
do
SHAKE
the
DAR
ling
BUDS
of
MAY
,
And
SUM
mer's
LEASE
hath
ALL
too
SHORT
a
DATE
:
Some
TIME
too
HOT
the
EYE
of
HEAV
en
SHINES
,
And
OF
ten
IS
his
GOLD
com
PLEX
ion
DIMM'D
;
And
EVE
ry
FAIR
from
FAIR
some
TIME
de
CLINES
,
By
CHANCE
, or
NAt
ure's
CHANG
ing
COURSE
, un
TRIMM'D
;
But
THY
e
TER
nal
SUM
mer
SHALL
not
FADE
Nor
LOSE
po
SSES
sion
OF
that
FAIR
thou
OW'ST
;
Nor
SHALL
death
BRAG
thou
WAN
de
R
'st
IN
his
SHADE
,
When
IN
e
TER
nal
LINES
to
TIME
thou
GROW'sT
;
So
LONG
as
MEN
can
BREATHE
or
EYES
can
SEE
So
LONG
lives
THIS
, and
THIS
gives
LIFE
to
THEE
.
Shall I compare thee to a summer's
DAY
?
Thou art more lovely and more
TEMPERATE
:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of
MAY
,
And summer's lease hath all too short a
DATE
:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven
SHINES
,
And often is his gold complexion
DIMM'D
;
And every fair from fair sometime
DECLINES
,
By chance, or nature's changing course,
UNTRIMM'D
;
But thy eternal summer shall not
FADE
Nor lose possession of that fair thou
OW'ST
;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his
SHADE
,
When in eternal lines to time thou
GROW'ST
;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can
SEE
,
So long lives this, and this gives life to
THEE
.
Sound Devices
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all
too short
a
date
:
Sometime too hot the
eye
of heaven
shines
,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every
fair
from
fair
sometime declines,
By
ch
ance, or
nature's
ch
a
ng
i
ng

c
ourse, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou
ow'st
;
Nor shall Death brag thou
wander'st
in his shade,
When in
eterna
l l
ines
to time
thou
grow'st
;
So long as men can
breathe
or eyes can
see
,
So long
lives
this, and this
gives
life to
thee
.
Figurative Language
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date:

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimm'd;
But thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st;
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st;
So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.
*"[T]emperate" means mild or perfect temperatures. Shakespeare is saying that summer is perfect.
*"[T]he eye of heaven" is the sun.
*"[E]very fair from fair sometime declines" means the beauty of everything beautiful will fade.
*"[N]ature's changing course" means the natural changes that age and time bring.
*"[T]hat fair thou ow'st" means the beauty the lover possesses.
*"[E]ternal lines to time thou grow'st"-

The poet is using a grafting metaphor in this line. Grafting is a technique used to join parts from two plants with cords so that they grow as one. Thus the beloved becomes immortal, grafted to time with the poet's cords (his "eternal lines").
Diction
Full transcript