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Responsive Classroom

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by

Greg Theriault

on 12 March 2013

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Transcript of Responsive Classroom

Responsive
Classroom WHAT IS
RESPONSIVE
CLASSROOM? Does the Responsive Classroom® approach work?
If so, how and for whom?
by Dr. Sara Rimm-Kaufman,
University of Virginia, Curry School of Education
2008 - 2011 Implementation Research EMOTIONAL SOCIAL ACADEMIC PHILOSOPHY SEVEN GUIDING
PRINCIPLES Social
vs.
Academic How
vs.
What Social
Skills Knowing
our
Children Cognitive
Growth How
Adults
Work Knowing
and
Working With
Families COMPONENTS Classroom
Organization Working
with
Families Interactive
Modeling Academic
Choice Morning
Meeting Rule
Creation Positive
Teacher
Language Logical
Consequences Guided
Discovery Collaborative
Problem
Solving Educators creating safe, challenging,
and joyful elementary schools Costs Option 1 TIMELINE Intro to Responsive Classroom
Preview for next year Improved
social
skills Whole school approach Higher
academic
achievement Improved
behavior Improved
instruction RC Level I
-30 hours (4.5 days)
-onsite PD Topics >Morning Meeting
>Rule creation
>Interactive modeling
>Positive teacher language
>Responding to misbehavior
(inc. logical consequences) Ongoing >Consultation
>Program evaluation
> PLCs
-RC Materials/resources
-workshop (MM and academics* YEAR 1 June 2013 2013-2014 Intro to Responsive Classroom
Preview for next year RC Level II
-30 hours (4.5 days)
-onsite PD Topics >Positive teacher language
-reinforcing language
-open-ended questioning
>Classroom organization
>Collaborative problem-solving
>Guided discovery
>Academic choice Ongoing >Consultation
>Program evaluation
> PLCs
-RC Materials/resources
>September 2014
-workshop "Essentials for Special Area Teachers YEAR 2 Summer 2014 2014-2015 Key Findings 1: Improved Student Achievement

Teachers' use of Responsive Classroom practices predicts gains in student math and reading achievement.

Socio-economics: The associations between Responsive Classroom practices and achievement are equally strong for children eligible for free/reduced price lunch and those not eligible.

Greater effect on low-achieving students: The association between teachers' use of Responsive Classroom practices and math achievement appears to be stronger for students who are initially low achieving than for others. Key Findings 2: Improved Teacher-Student Interactions

Teachers' increased use of Responsive Classroom practices leads to classrooms that are more emotionally supportive and organized.

Morning Meeting: Teachers who use Responsive Classroom Morning Meeting provide improved emotional support for students and improved classroom organization.

Academic Choice: Teachers who use Academic Choice also provide improved emotional support during math instruction. Key Findings 3: Higher Quality Instruction in Mathematics

Training in the Responsive Classroom approach leads teachers to provide more skillful standards-based mathematics instruction. For example, they facilitate or structure:
Higher levels of mathematical discourse
Better use of and translation among mathematical representations
Lessons with greater cognitive depth
Lessons with greater coherence and accuracy Key Findings 4: 4. Importance of Support for Teachers

A supportive setting is important to teachers' implementation of Responsive Classroom practices. Teachers are more likely to use these practices when:
Their principal shows buy-in to the Responsive Classroom approach
They receive coaching while implementing new Responsive Classroom practices
Their school climate offers validation and social support for trying the Responsive Classroom approach and allows them to adopt the approach at their own pace Previous Research Social and Academic Learning Study on the Responsive Classroom® Approach
by Dr. Sara Rimm-Kaufman,
University of Virginia, Curry School of Education
2001-2004 Key Findings:

Children showed greater increases in reading and math test scores.
Children felt more positive about school.
Children had better social skills.
Teachers offered more high quality instruction.
Teachers collaborated with each other more
Teachers felt more effective and more positive about teaching. Evaluation Intended Audience Elementary Schools Grades K - 6 Expected Outcomes Increases academic achievement
Decreases problem behaviors Improves social skills
Incorporates the increased use of high quality instruction A Multi-year Evaluation of the Responsive Classroom Approach: Its Effectiveness and Acceptability in Promoting Social and Academic Competence
by Dr. Stephen N. Elliott,
University of Wisconsin, Madison
1996-1998 A correlation over time between social skills improvement and improved Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) scores. The Responsive Classroom Approach: Its Effectiveness and Acceptability
by Dr. Stephen N. Elliott,
University of Wisconsin, Madison
1995 Results of West Haven study (1993) were replicated
Students whose teachers used Responsive Classroom practices generally were perceived to exhibit higher levels of social skills and fewer problem behaviors than those with limited or no exposure
Findings held up across racially diverse sub-samples Caring to Learn: A Report on the Positive Impact of a Social Curriculum
Dr. Stephen N. Elliott,
University of Wisconsin, Madison
1993 Students whose teachers used Responsive Classroom practices were perceived to exhibit higher levels of social skills and fewer problem behaviors than those with limited or no exposure
Findings held up across racially diverse sub-samples Before: Use surveys to collect data from students, parents, and staff regarding their perception of our school's climate
Suspension/discipline data for current school year
Standardized testing results for current year
This data will be used to measure our progress against During/Ongoing Walk throughs/ drop in/ informal observations specifically looking for principles/components of RC
Principals meet with RC reps to discuss workshops and teacher progress
Standardized testing results are analyzed for change in trends
Suspension/Discipline data is analyzed for change in trends
Survey students, parents, and staff regarding their perception of our school's climate as well as impacts of RC implementation Tools A measure of fidelity of implementation of the responsive classroom approach
The Classroom Practices Teacher Survey (CPTS)
The Classroom Practices Frequency Scale(CPFS)
Connecticut School Climate Assessment Instruments (Parents, Staff, Elementary School) Whole school - Level I, II: $38, 700 (two years)
-Includes:
30 hours training and follow-up support
Materials and resources (Books, DVDs) Option 2 Responsive Classroom sampler: $2,400 (30 teachers)
-Includes:
One day of training
Individualized training for teacher leaders: $729/teacher
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