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Life Cycle of an Eraser

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by

Chiara Luna Erfurt

on 3 May 2013

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Transcript of Life Cycle of an Eraser

By Chiara Erfurt The Life Cycle of an Eraser Extraction Phase The most important raw material needed to make an eraser is rubber.
The rubber can be natural or synthetic Production Phase The raw materials come from companies and are transported to the manufactures once extracted. The materials then all go through a quality control to make sure it meets all specifications. For experienced companies that process may not be necessary. After the material was inspected it is used to produce the final product. Distribution Phase Consumption Phase Once bought by the consumer, the eraser is used to get rid of mistakes or blend in pencil marks.
They will slowly get smaller and can be used until they are completely gone due to the constant dropping of eraser dust. Disposal Phase Based on the materials economy
The most common synthetic rubber is derived from the chemicals styrene and butadiene.

Styrene is a liquid derived from ethylbenzene. Ethylbenzene is usually made from ethylene and benzene, both of which are derived from petroleum. Butadiene is a gas, derived either directly from petroleum or from substances known as butanes and butenes, which are derived from petroleum. Natural rubber is obtained from latex produced by the rubber tree (Hevea brasilienesis) Other materials:
pigments that change the color;
white-> zinc oxide and titanium oxide
red-> iron oxide
others-> various organic dyes an important ingredient is sulfur as it allows the rubber to be vulcanized (It uses heat and sulfur to make rubber more durable and resistant to heat)
vegetable oil may be added to rubber to make it softer and easier to shape.
Pumice (a natural mineral) makes the eraser more abrasive. The only thing that is disposed from the actual eraser is the eraser dust. It takes the normal way trough the bin and get's burnt or collected together with more every day trash. Some people also leave the dust on floors/furniture where it gets cleaned off and thrown onto the earth along with the cleaning water, this means it makes its way into nature. However, using an eraser most likely means that a pencil or paper was involved and both of those things will sooner or later have to be disposed as well. The erasers are produced with in the country where the material has been extracted
then they are shipped to other countries
they can then be found in malls, marts and other retail shops in various colors and sizes. A linear cycle Erasers are rapped in plastic and paper mostly with the companies name on it for promotion ENVIRONMENTAL and SOCIAL impacts throughout the cycle Production: Distribution: Consumption: Disposal: Bibliography Works Cited
"How Products Are Made." How Eraser Is Made. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 May 2013. <http://www.madehow.com/Volume-5/Eraser.html>.
"Latex Production Methods on the Rubber Tree." Latex Production. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 May 2013. <http://www.the-pillow.com.au/resources/latex_production.php>.
"Welcome :: The Association of Natural Rubber Producing Countries (ANRPC)." Welcome :: The Association of Natural Rubber Producing Countries (ANRPC). N.p., n.d. Web. 01 May 2013. <http://www.anrpc.org/>. Environmental impacts: Social impacts: Environmental impacts: Environmental impacts: Environmental impacts: Environmental impacts: Social impacts: Social impacts: Social impacts: Social impacts: Extraction: Rubber trees take a huge amount of time to fully grow but can only live for 25-30 years when rubber is extracted from them. The reason for this is that latex is used as a liquid to carry nutrients throughout the tree's trunk. However, when the latex is extracted the tree becomes dry which results in being useless for the producer so it is chopped down and the wood will be used for other purposed such as furniture production. Eraser dust... Paper waste... ...that could be recycled Pencil waste (wood, paint, metal/aluminum)... Final product Extracting Shipping latex Processing latex Shaping the rubber/processed latex Cutting the rubber There are no big contributions made to the environment in the disposal stage as there is only very little garbage produced by the eraser dust. However, some other products that come along with the consumption of erasers, are papers and pencils which will also make waste in the end. While using the eraser, little eraser dust is produced and will minimally add to the garbage. People working with burning this garbage may breathe in the toxic cases or chemicals that dissolve in this process. It made it easier for society fo write thoughts down without having to cross them out when they wanted to go over them. Erasers are really helpful fo keeping things tidy but still expanded on thoughts. Since the erasers are shipped around the world it contributes a lot to the environment in terms of releasing Carbon Dioxide and increasing global warming. People may breathe in the contaminated air, produce while shipping, which could affect their health. Photographs:

http://biz.thestar.com.my/archives/2011/8/8/business/b_02rubberChart.jpg

http://www.facts-about-india.com/image-files/india-shipping-image.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_3D_ZLOC0At4/TIoRtgNexXI/AAAAAAAABOE/bLGPs4Otns8/s1600/Akkerman_Shop_Front_Amsterdam.jpg

http://blogs-images.forbes.com/rogerkay/files/2011/03/pencil1.jpg

http://delightfuldesignideas.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Crumpled-paper-texture.jpg

http://www.filetransit.com/images/screen/e8f49546d0f64858c5c7b2918bc281ba_Cookie_eraser.jpg

http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQy3vmzkw0YRs5hCl5kPH3it3JxPPXOidTz6qiM4RjUrSE-I_VC

http://www.semiyun.com/wp-content/uploads/Kullan%C4%B1lm%C4%B1%C5%9F-Silgi.jpg The making of erasers also requires many natural resources that will also add on to air poolution. Once the erasers are shaped, the remaining water is drained out of them and is dumped into nearby bodies of water, causing harm to many living organisms and habitats. The workers that extract the latex from the rubber trees do not live under good working conditions as they get paid a very little amount every month that cannot provide them with a healthy lifestyle. Again, the wages of the workers are really low as well as being exposed to toxic gases which may cause issues with their health. It's all connected: Every stage of this process is connected because one couldn't exist without each other. It does not only affect each other in the making but also influences the global environment and society. Rubber comes from places all over the world and is shipped to others for sale, therefor the whole global eraser market depends on each other and can not only be run by one country.
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