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A Different History

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by

Patch Huish

on 27 June 2013

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Transcript of A Different History

Sujata Bhatt
1956
1968
1991
2013
0
+
-
=
9
8
7
1
2
3
4
5
6
c
Sarasvati, Hindu Goddess of the arts
Pan, Greek God of Nature.
What themes does the poem explore?
NATURE:
Literary techniques
Structure of the Poem:
Free verse, 31 lines, second stanza after the 18th, complex sentences only with no rhyme scheme or specific syllabic pattern this emphasises the contemplative tone and slows down the reader. There is no caesura just varying end-stopping and enjambment. Capital in literally correct places only; at the start of sentences and for proper nouns. There is not a capital letter at the beginning of every line.
A rather lacklustre timeline.
A Different History
Um... What do I write here?


By Sujata Bhatt, Innit!
A D I F F E R E N T
H I S T O R Y
"snakes or monkeys"
"Every tree is sacred"
"without offending the tree"
The poet evokes the impression that natural things are sacred and powerful.
LANGUAGE:
"To be rude to a book"
"Which language has not been the oppressor's tongue?
"Which language truly meant to murder someone?"
"A sin to toss"
"BOOK"
War
Religion
Oppressor
Scythe
Torture
Conqueror
Murder
Sin
Gods
Sacred
YOU HAVE NO PROOF.
YOUR LIFE IS A LIE!

THE END.
WASTE OF MONEY
EVEN BIGGER WASTE OF MONEY
SHAMELESS PRODUCT PLACEMENT.
Born in Ahmedabad in India.
Moved to USA
Won a Cholmondeley Award
Now lives in Germany
• Onomatopoeia: slam, toss.
• Alliteration: soul scythe swooping.
• Negative Lexis: dead, sin, emigrated, rude, torture.
• Figurative Language: rude to a book, offending the tree, language truly meant to murder (personification). Books symbolise language. ‘Conqueror’ is war and death. ‘Sin’ and ‘Gods’ is religion, god like beauty. References to Gods , both Greek and Hindu ‘Pan’ and ‘Sarasvati’.
• Rhetorical questions are used at the end; ‘which language has not been the oppressor’s tongue’. No Question mark at the end of the last question means she gets carried away and forgets it’s a question.
• Nature Lexis: ‘tree’ ‘snakes’ ‘monkeys’.

THE POEM!
And how does it happen

that after the torture,

after the soul has been cropped

with a long scythe swooping out

of the conqueror’s face-

the unborn grandchildren

grow to love that strange language.
hard on the table

a sin to toss one carelessly

across a room.

You must learn how to turn the pages gently

without disturbing Sarasvati,

without offending the tree

from whose wood the paper was made.

Which language

has not been the oppressor’s tongue?

Which language

truly meant to murder someone?


Great Pan is not dead;

he simply emigrated

to India.

Here the gods roam freely,

disguised as snakes or monkeys;

every tree is sacred

and it is a sin

to be rude to a book.

It is a sin to shove a book aside

with your foot,

a sin to slam books down

SUBLIMINAL MESSAGE!
SUBLIMINAL MESSAGE!
Get it? Eh? No? Fine...
So what have you learnt?

Absolutely nothing except that Patrick tells awful jokes.
Also that the poem is about the immense power of language... But you just paid attention to the terrible jokes, didn't you?
Full transcript