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Dante's Inferno

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Cody Alexander

on 19 April 2010

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Transcript of Dante's Inferno

Dante's Inferno Dante Aligheri was an Italian poet of the Middle Ages. He was born in Florence. He died and is buried in Ravenna. Inferno Inferno is the first part of Dante Alighieri's fourteenth-century epic poem Divine Comedy. There are 9 levels that he describes, and 9 being the worst level First Circle In Limbo reside the unbaptized and the virtuous pagans, who, though not sinful, did not accept Christ. They are not punished in an active sense, but rather grieve only because of their separation from God, without hope of reconciliation Second Circle In the second circle of Hell are those overcome by lust. Dante condemns these "carnal malefactors"[7] for letting their appetites sway their reason. They are the first ones to be truly punished in Hell. These souls are blown about to and fro by the terrible winds of a violent storm, without hope of rest. This symbolizes the power of lust to blow one about needlessly and aimlessly. Third Circle Cerberus guards the gluttons, forced to lie in a vile slush produced by ceaseless foul, icy rain (Virgil obtains safe passage past the monster by filling its three mouths with mud). Fourth Circle Those whose attitude toward material goods deviated from the appropriate mean are punished in the fourth circle. They include the avaricious or miserly (including many "clergymen, and popes and cardinals
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