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Residential Curriculum 2014

RA Training 2014
by

Danielle Nied

on 11 August 2014

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Transcript of Residential Curriculum 2014

Danielle M. Nied
Assistant Director
Saint Louis University
RA Training 2014

Residential Curriculum
But change is difficult!
What is Residential Curriculum?
Co-constructed
Driven by informed perspective
Students utilize own experiences to make meaning
What is a curriculum?
-In a program model we did not measure student learning, only student attendance or satisfaction

-Little to no direction

-Reactionary instead of intentional

-Emphasis on group rather than individual need
Start 3:26 Stop 7:58
Outcomes based
Highly Intentional
Driven by student educational needs
Learning over time and learning over sequence (not linear just sequenced)
Student Learning Outcomes
Student
Experiences
What
We Do
Benchmark: Community Responsibility
An engaged and active community member understands the impact one has on positive community development. From the relationships with peers, engagement with staff and respect for the physical space, residents have an obligation to intentionally shape and approach community development. Residents will be given the opportunity to co-construct a positive community rooted in personal responsibility.

Outcomes:
Demonstrate civility toward their residential community.
Apply confidence with interpersonal skills.
Demonstrate sustained relationships within the residential community.
Articulate their behavioral impact on community.

What are the outcomes?
Benchmark: Understanding of Self and Others
To be an inclusive and transformative member of the residential community, members must reflect and understand dimensions of one’s own identity. Members should be able to participate in healthy dialogue and conversations about social identities, values, and beliefs. Additionally, community members need to demonstrate a respect for others lens or experience, willingness to understand and ability to view multiple perspectives.

Outcomes:
Demonstrate a willingness to engage in dialogue to better understand the perspective of others.
Explore understanding of self and multiple dimensions of their identity.
Articulate personal values, beliefs and identities.
Participate in dialogue about societal structures and privilege as it relates to social identity.
Benchmark: Academic and Intellectual Capacities
As a member of the residential community, the desire is for each person to continue to cultivate ones own academic and intellectual capabilities. Members should be able to participate in engaged intellectual conversations with peers to further advance ones knowledge and skill to transform society. Each member needs to demonstrate respect for and investment in an academic environment. Additionally, members are expected to connect learning inside and outside of the classroom to demonstrate holistic learning.

Outcomes:
Describe connection between curricular and co-curricular.
Explain personal contribution to constructing a academically supportive environment.
Identify support systems for academic success.
Model engagement in academic and intellectual discussions with residential peers.

What would you want students to learn after their time living in the Residence Halls?
What do we teach students?
Activity
What is Residential Curriculum?
Outcomes based
Co-constructed
Driven by informed perspective
Highly Intentional
Utilize resident experiences to make meaning
Sequenced Learning over time (not linear)
Terminology

Facilitator Guide
Strategies
Objectives
Outcomes
Curriculum
Each resident will develop.....
Facilitators- Essential Piece
Gain as much as you invest
More direction/ guidance
What does this mean for me as an RA?
Question & Answer Period
Each RHC and GHC will provide you with a facilitator guide at various points in the semester
Facilitator Guide shows the direct connection to the outcome and provides specific direction for you as Resident Advisor
Facilitator Guide
Housing and Residence Life
Saint Louis University
Griesedieck Complex
Facilitator Guide

Date(s): November 17- December 1, 2014

Learning Outcome:
Understanding of Self and Others
Residents will articulate personal values, beliefs, and identities.

Additional Intended Goals:
Allow the residents some one on one time with the RA to enhance a personal connection.
Give the residents the sense that there is a resource available to them if they are having any issues or want advice.
Build on relationships developed in the first part of the semester.

Purpose
Through these intentional conversations, students will be given an opportunity to discuss their transition to college in general and their connection to SLU. Student should be guided through a conversation that builds on the first Intentional Conversation.

Facilitator’s Guide
Meet individually with each resident for approximately 30 minutes. These meetings are not akin to one on ones you have with your RHC, but are supposed to be natural conversations between two people. They can be scheduled, but can also be an informal meal, a walk around campus, a chat when you can pop into their room, or a conversation if they stop by to see you. These questions are written in a certain way to convey the direction that you should lead the conversation, but do not feel tied to words. Make sure the conversation is natural and you feel comfortable having these talks.

Questions:
What have you learned about yourself while living in Griesedieck?
How do you think others see you, and how do they treat you because of these?
How have you been personally challenged by the diversity of individuals living in Griesedieck?
How has what you learned about people before attending SLU been challenged/changed by living in Griesedieck?

Learning Community
What have you learned about this floor’s topic since August?
What is it like living on a floor with people with similar interests?
Do you still see the differences in people’s identities even though you all have this community common interest?

Assessment
Assessment will be conducted by collecting written narratives from the RAs after the conversations via weekly reports.

Sample Facilitator Guide
Sample Lesson Plan
Housing and Residence Life
Saint Louis University
First Year Educational Plan
Lesson Plan

Learning Strategy: Intentional Conversation 1

Date(s): Before Fall Break

Learning Outcome
Understanding of Self and Others

Learning Objectives:
Residents will demonstrate a willingness to engage in dialogue to better understand the perspective of others.
Residents will explore understanding of self and the multiple dimensions of identity.

Additional Intended Goals:
Allow the residents some one on one time with the RA to develop a personal connection.
Create a space for the student to voice concerns give the RA an opportunity to connect the resident to available campus resources.

Key Campus Partnerships:
None.

Purpose
Through these intentional conversations, students will be given an opportunity to discuss their transition to college in general and their connection to SLU. Student will also begin to reflect on their personal history and identity in a way that it allows them to understand how these attributes might impact personal stories.

Facilitator’s Guide
Meet individually with each resident for approximately 30 minutes or less. These meetings are not akin to one on ones you have with your RHC, but are supposed to be natural conversations between two people. They can be scheduled, but can also be an informal meal, a walk around campus, a chat when you can pop in to your room, or a conversation if they stop by to see you. These questions are written in a certain way to convey the direction that you should lead the conversation, but do not feel tied to words. Make sure the conversation is natural and you feel comfortable having these talks.

Questions:

This is a space to ask about who they see themselves to be. You can ask questions about the resident’s family, siblings, where and how they grew up, things they are passionate about? You can bring in your own experiences during this conversation by talking about parallels between their situation and yours.

How is your transition to college and to SLU? What do you think college will be like? Do you expect any challenges academically or socially? How do you feel like you fit in at SLU?

What types of things do you hope to learn about yourself while living in Gries?
Further prompts: Who are you, how do you define yourself? How do you think you’ll learn from the diversity of people living here? How will your background and experiences impact your time here at SLU?

Learning Community
Further questions: Why did you choose to live on this Learning Community floor? How did you become interested in the floor’s topic? Have you been making strong connections with the other floor residents?
Assessment
Assessment will be conducted by collecting written narratives from the RAs after the conversations. After this collection, the narratives will be analyzed for key words and will be complied for future reporting.
Educational Strategies
Community Standards
Community Meetings
Intentional Conversations
Roommate/ Apartment
Agreements
Passive Activities
Community Experiences

Social Media
Service
Dialogue
Community Development Units
Student Staff will be able to enter into an online database their planned and impromptu community development activities.
Staff will then be credited with a Community Development Unit (CDU) for the community initiative.
CDUs and Lesson Plans are not a numbers game. While that drives some staff, it is about the quality of interaction the student staff have with residents, and residents with one another.
Need to develop a First Six Week community development plan with each student staff member.
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