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Leadership in Beowulf

Group Paper Mrs. Cammarata 5th period
by

Farris Ann Luce

on 18 September 2012

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Transcript of Leadership in Beowulf

Joycie Bernstein #1
Anna Catherine Gurosky #6
Laura Keel #7
Farris Ann Luce #9
Margaret Pritchard #14 Leadership values Fear that Good Leadership
is dying out They said that of all the kings upon the earth / he was the man most gracious and fair-minded, / kindest to his people and keenest to win fame. (lines 3180-82)
“Then the king in his great-heartedness unclasped the collar of gold from his neck and gave it to the young thane…” (lines 2810-1811).
“And so their leader, the lord and guard of coffer and strongroom, with customary grace bestowed upon Beowulf both sets of gifts. A fair witness can see how well each behaved” (lines 1045-1048). Comitatus: exchange of
goods for service Intro quote: “The prospect of gaining a glorious name in the wael-raes, in the rush of battle-slaughter, the pride of defending one’s lord and bearing heroic witness to the integrity of the bond between him and his hall companions—a bond sealed in the gleo and gidd of peace-time feasting and ring-giving—this is what gave drive and sanction to the Germanic warrior-culture enshrined in Beowulf” (Heaney xv-xvi). Mental Strength Beowulf's Confidence: "He knows he can trample down you Danes/to his heart's content, humiliate and murder/ without fear of reprisal. But he will find me different./ I will show him how Geats shape to kill/ in the heat of battle. Then whoever wants to/ may go bravely to mead, when morning light,/ scarfed in sun-dazzle, shines froth from the south/ and brings another daybreak to the world" (599-606). Physical Strength "Time and again, Beowulf's warriors worked to defend their lord's life" (lines 793-795). Comitatus: Loyalty "Then he drew himself up beside his shield./ The fabled warrior in his war-shirt and helmet/ trusted in his own strength entirely/ and went under the crag. No coward path" (lines 2538-41). Glory Until Death "For twelve winters, seasons of woe for, / the lord of the sheildings , suffered under / his load of sorrow; and so, before long, / the news was known over the whole world"
Line 147-150 Hrothgar "No help or backing was to be had then / from his high-born comrades; that hand-picked troop / broke ranks and ran for their lives / to the safety of the wood. But within one heart / sorrow welled up: in a man of worth / the claims of kinship cannot be denied." (lines 2596-2601) Wiglaf Beowulf's death "I had a fixed purpose when I put to sea./ As I sat in the boat with my band of men,/ I meant to perform to the uttermost/ what your people wanted or perish in attempt,/ in the fiend's clutches. And I shall fulfill that purpose,/ prove myself with a proud deed/ or meet my death here in the mead-hall" (632-638) Beowulf's Journey's Purpose
“Then the Halfdane’s son presented Beowulf with a gold standard as a victory gift, an embroidered banner…” (lines 1019-1021). -Beowulf was regarded as "the mightiest man on earth, high-born and powerful," (lines 197-8)
-Beowulf showed this strength by winning a swimming competition and slaying 3 monsters- grendel, his mother, and a dragon "The battle-famed king, bullwork of his earls, / orderde a gold-chained heirloom of Hrethel's / to be brought in; it was the beste example / of a gem-studden sword in the Geat treasury. / This he laid on Beowulf's lap / and then rewarded him with land as well, / seven thousand hides; and a hall and a throne." (lines 2190-2196) Glory of War Good leaders are rewarded Good leaders give "If this combat kills me [...] send Hygelac the treasures I received" (lines 1480-1484). The son of Ecgtheow swam back to his people" (line 2368). "I remember that time when mead was flowing, how we pledged loyalty to our lord in the hall, [...] as and when his need required it" (lines 2633-2638). "So deadly and ineluctable is the underlying thought, that those who in the circle of light, within the besieged hall, are absorbed in work or talk and do not look to the battlements, either do not regard it or recoil. Death comes to the feast, and they say He gibbers: He has no sense of proportion" (Tolkien). -Grendel: "the captain of evil discovered himself in a handgrip harder than anything he had ever encountered in any man on the face of the earth," (lines 749-52) -Grendel's mother: "so the shielding's hero, hard-pressed and enraged,took firm hold of the hilt and swung the blade in an arc, a resolute blow that bit deep into her neck-bone," (lines 1563-6) -dragon: "inspired again by the thought of glory, the war-king threw his whole strength behind a sword-stroke and connected with the skull," (lines 2677-80) “He only knows who needs his lord As I do, eager for long-missing aid;He only knows who never sleeps Without the deepest dreams of longing.Sometimes it seems I see my lord,Kiss and embrace him, bend my handsAnd head to his knee, kneeling as though He still sat enthroned, ruling his thanes” (lines 36-43). Heaney, Seamus. Introduction. Beowulf. Trans.
Tolkien, J. R. R. “Beowulf: The Monsters and the Critics.” DISCovering Authors. Online ed. Detroit: Gale, 2003. Discovering Collection. Gale. Mountain Brook High School. Web. 19 September 2012.

Beowulf. Trans. Seamus Heaney. New York: Ferrar, 2001. Print.

Seamus Heaney. New York: Ferrar, 2001. Ix-xxx. Print.

“The Wanderer.” Trans. Burton Raffel. The Language of Literature British Literature. Ed. Arthur N. Applebee, et al. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2002. Print. http://www.vhinkle.com/feudal/heorot2.jpg http://faculty.weber.edu/dkrantz/images/beowulf_cov.jpg http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/images/anke05.jpg http://csis.pace.edu/grendel/projs991e/Image-fight.jpg http://api.ning.com/files/ZNJCFpsj0VH68VjLJdoTmfyQdy9CJweIRdiNx8g3FpwSF5AHYUyisxeaiBWN-YoBDBiVwvbE8Q8hq-xHcSklMStiwvngi8fK/TreasurePile_Shot_HUGEST_Wide.jpg
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