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North Limestone (NoLi) Community Assessment

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Ashley Gei

on 9 March 2015

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Transcript of North Limestone (NoLi) Community Assessment

North Limestone (NoLi)
An Asset-Based Community Assessment

helps social workers and community members identify, support, and mobilize existing resources to create a shared vision of change (Sharpe, Greaney, Lee, and Royce, 2000)
encourages greater creativity for community members to address problems and obstacles (Sharpe et al., 2000)
strengthens communities by assessing public capital (Green and Haines, 2012)
encourages active citizenship, which strengthens the capacity of people to claim their rights to assets on which they depend for their livelihood (Mathie and Cunningham, 2003)

What does a Asset-Based Community Assessment do?
Asset Map
Six Neighborhood Characteristics
Census
Data
Results

Conclusion
Presented by: Ashley Gei, John Wade Langston, Emily Weeks & Eva Nyerges
Geographic Characteristics
NoLi Neighborhood seems to be divisions within the neighborhood visible by housing type/quality.

“I think that map works for local organizing and policy purposes, but if you ask residents in the area where they live, I think very few would say noli. The SW area is going to say downtown; the E side is going to say Castlewood. The marketing effect has been really interesting. Just in the last couple of years, a handful of people have branded this area as noli, where it didn't have an unique identity before. “

-L. Flowers, North Lime neighborhood resident

North Limestone Neighborhood Association Map (2014)
Physical Characteristics
Social and Culture Characteristics
Christ Church Cathedral
First Presbyterian Church
Historic St Paul AME Church
St. Andrew’s Episcopal
Church
St. Benedict’s Church
Evergreen Missionary
Baptist Church
House of God
Embrace United Methodist
Church
West End Baptist Church
Grace Baptist Church
New Beginning Church of God in Christ
Arlington Christian Church
Edgelawn Baptist Temple

Churches
The Nest center for Women, Children, and Families
NoLi MusicWorks + Common Good
Center for Family and Community Services
Social Services Agencies
Bars
Molly Brooke’s Irish
Bar
Crossing’s Bar
Limestone Blue
Sidebar Grill
Lexington Beerworks
Arcadium
Al’s Bar/Al’s Sidecar
Willie’s Locally Known
Meeting Spaces
Third Street Stuff

North Limestone Coffee and Donuts
Economic Characteristics
Banks & Lending Institutions
Cardtronics ATM (Circle K)
Chase Bank
Chase Bank ATM(s)
1205 North Broadway
716 North Broadway
300 North Broadway (Translyvania University)
404 North Limestone Street.
Traditional Bank Inc. (Shorty's Urban Market)
First National Building
PNC Bank
"Big Blue Building" (Fifth Third Center)
Central Bank & Trust Co. (Turfland Mall)
Cash American Pawn
Big M Market
H & M Grocery Store
The Fruit Market
Progress Market
Our Market
George’ Deli
Shorty’s Urban Market
Neighborhood Grocery
Walgreen’s
Doc Lane’s Veterinary Pharmacy
CVS Pharmacy
Rite Aid Pharmacy
Save-A-Lot
Lexington Farmer’s Market
Cheapside Park - Only Available Saturdays

Grocery & Drug
Stores
Lextran
• Route #6 - North Broadway
• Route #7 - North Limestone
• Route #24 - Trolley Blue Route
• Route #25 - Trolley Green Route

Taxi Services
• Bluegrass Cab of Lexington
• Yellow Cab
• Mr. Taxi

Bicycling

Transportation
2014 Political Candidates

Kentucky Senate
Mitch McConnell (R) (Incumbent)
Alison Lundergan Grimes (D)

Mayor
Anthany Beatty, Sr.
Jim Gray (Incumbent)

City Council
At – large
Steve Kay
Richard Moloney
Bill Cegelka
Kevin O. Stinnett

District 3
Chuck Ellinger, II
J. “Jake” Gibbs

Political Characteristics
Sheriff
Kathy Witt (incumbent)

Cororner
Larry Owens
Political Issues
Urban development
Gray has argued that downtown revitalization will help stimulate the city's economy, saying, "This project goes far beyond our city limits [...] we can take the next step forward to elevate our brand, and grow jobs and economic opportunity."

Anthany Beatthy, Sr., have criticized these efforts, saying that they have come at the expense of Lexington's neighborhoods and surrounding areas.

Crime
Gray pointed out that his downtown revitalization project would help alleviate this problem by rehabilitating traditionally high crime areas. He also noted that budgetary savings under his administration have allowed the city to hire more police officers.

Conversely, Beatty claimed that police staffing levels were far too low and that the number of active police officers in Lexington needed to be increased.

Lexington's city council candidates have added additional layers to the conversation about crime. At-large candidates Richard Moloney and Bill Cegelka, for example, said at a candidate forum in September that neighborhood-specific police units had proven effective in the past. District 6 incumbent turned 2014 at-large candidate Kevin O. Stinnett noted that a combination of additional police resources, better jobs and education was needed.


Lexington, Kentucky municipal election, 2014. (2014) Ballotpedia. http://ballotpedia.org/Lexington,_Kentucky_municipal_elections,_2014#Urban_development
Geographic
Physical
Social and Culture
Economics
Political
Environment

Newspapers
Herald-Leader

Ace Weekly

What Lexington Needs

Business Focus Monthly Magazine
(Greater Lexington Chamber of
Commerce, Inc.)

Kentucky Kernel

Tops Magazine (Fashion)

Parenting Magazine

Lexington and Kentucky
Apartment Guide

Job Issues
Environment
“A community’s environmental capital is diverse because it comprises the entire range of natural resources within a community, from water to air to land and more” (Green and Haines, 2012,
p. 234).
Environmental Capital
Duncan Park, Lexington, KY
Other Environment Capitals
Duncan Park
Castlewood Park
Gratz Park.
North Pole Community Garden
New Beginnings Church of God Community Garden
church garden
empty green lots


street trees
edible fruit trees
former Russell Cave Elementary
STEAM Academy, Sayre
Lexington Traditional Magnet School
NoLi CDC Sustainability plan
recycling bins/trash cans

Community Gardens
North Pole Community Garden
New Beginnings Church of God/Castlewood Community Garden
problems with stormwater drainage due to a lack of upkeep and sewer system neglect over the years.

basements flood several times per year, leaving the houses at risk for toxic mold growth.

According to local historian and real estate agent J. McKeighen, the soils in the neighborhood may contain contaminants at site specific locations, e.g. lead (personal communication, October 10, 2014)

This could be dangerous for children, though adults would be at lower risk for poisoning.

lack of natural or human made body of water

no bike paths

Environmental Issues
Environmental Issues
Historically, homeowners in the area used coal to heat their homes and likely tossed ashes, containing mercury and other toxins, in the yards (J. McKeighen).

The LFUCG will test soils for a nominal fee and the UK extension is available to make suggestions on what plants are safe to grow.

Ryan Koch, the executive director of Seedleaf, helps the area make its own compost and brings in outside soil for raised vegetable beds

train tracks create noise pollution and safety issue, esp.
for youth

Increase community garden capacity
Add rain garden and butterfly garden
Install permeable pavement
Urban forestry
NoLi CDC
Sustainability Plan
Stormwater basin
Cisterns/rain harvesting
Rain barrels
Stormwater planters
Green roof

According to the United States Department of Agriculture [USDA] (2014) approximately half of the North Lime neighborhood is considered to be a low income, low access food desert. http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-access-research-atlas/go-to-the-atlas.aspx#.VC1SMEv7puZ

Urban food deserts are defined as areas with a relatively high number of households (218 of 1,240 total households (17.6%)) without access to
vehicles that are more than half mile
from a Supermarket (USDA, 2014)
Food Sustainability
According to J. Porter, Seedleaf and Tweens Nutrition Coalition staff member, many residents purchase groceries at Save-a-lot, while a few who have access to transportation will go to Kroger or Walmart. o n E New Circle Rd

The Lexington Farmer’s Market is located in Cheapside Park on the E Main St side of this neighborhood every Saturday from May to November, however, according to J. Porter, the food, though quality, is unaffordable for a lot of residents and is located on Lexington’s former slave trading site.

There are several small grocery stores in the area that are either unaffordable or lack quality food including Shorty’s and Progress Market.

The two community gardens in the area are a source of fresh, free, u-pick produce, though in small quantities, from May - October.

Good Neighbor Store network

Double-Up Food Bucks program

Food Sustainability
•Renovated to run-down
•Historic to impoverished
•Both rental as well as family-owned
•Multiple story, elaborate to shotgun homes
Housing Stock
For Sale Property
For Rent Property
•Evidence of home repair
•Renovations and revitalizations
•Current and
previous projects
•Areas of focus
•Lack of
home
repair in
many areas
Home Repairs
•Roads mainly cared for
•Sidewalks need attention
•Nicer closer to downtown
•Garbage & recycle bins
Roads, Sidewalks,
& Garbage
Health Services
•Lack of services
•Chain pharmacies
•CVS
•Rite Aid
•Walgreens
•UK Hospital (with transportation)
General Population Characteristics
General Housing Characteristics
General Social Characteristics
Asset Map Features
The geographic boundaries of the NoLi neighborhood defined by the LFUCG don’t really adequately define the neighborhood boundaries, at least at present.

However, the census tracts, which divide the neighborhood up into three parts, seem to more accurately define individual neighborhood boundaries within the area.


http://www.lexingtonky.gov/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=16304
Discussion
Discussion
Strengths
diversity
NoLi CDC and LFUCG neighborhood branding
some community engagement (North Limestone Neighborhood Association)
a community art presence

Weaknesses
inequality in terms of income, housing quality, school quality
lack of social services “social services desert”
lack of positive partnerships between the neighborhood and surrounding universities
risk of gentrification

lack of scientifically sound methods for data collection
cannot measure reliability or validity
outsider observations (biased)
subjectivity
convenience sample of key informants
not a community driven process as characterizes ABCD
lack of comparison
hard to not focus on the negatives
we don’t know the extent of what community members have tried to change, are in the process of changing, or are not aware of/do not consider to be worth changing

Limitations
reduce inequality of income, housing quality, and school quality

“social services desert” - increase access to social services within the neighborhood

establish positive partnerships with the University of Kentucky and Transylvania

implement neighborhood watch group

Areas of Focus
for Intervention
Campbell, A. (2009). Better beginnings for babies. University of Kentucky: Lexington, KY. http://www.uky.edu/base/webuk/archives/spot-183.html
Fellin. (2001). The community and the social worker. pp. 138.
Green, G. P. and Haines, A. (2012). Asset Building and Community Development. (3rd ed.) Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Kentucky crime statistics and rate reports. (2012). http://www.cityrating.com/crime-statistics/kentucky/
Lexington Fayette-Urban County Government. (2014). Crime Map. http://www.raidsonline.com/?address=Lexington,%20KY
Mathie, A. and Cunningham, G. (2003). From clients to citizens: Asset-Based community development as a strategy for community driven development. Development in Practice, 13(5), 474-486.
(2014). New reports puts kentucky among states with highest teen births rate. WYKT: Lexington, KY. http://www.wkyt.com/news/state/headlines/New-report-puts-Kentucky-among-states-with-highest-teen-birth-rate-272002451.html
North Lime Community Development Corporation (2009). Sustainability plan. Lexington, KY.
North Limestone Neighborhood Association Map (2014). Retrieved from: http://app.lexingtonky.gov/MapIt.aspx
Sharpe, Greaney, Lee, and Royce (2000). Assets-oriented community assessment. Public Health Reports, 115, 205-211.
United States Department of Agriculture. (2014). [Map of Food Deserts in United States May 14, 2014]. Food Access Research Atlas. Retrieved from http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-access-research-atlas/go-to-the-atlas.aspx#.VC1SMEv7puZ
Yetter, D. & Riley, J. (2011). Status offenders: Kentucky among nation's leaders to jailing children. Courier-Journal. http://archive.courier-journal.com/article/20111211/NEWS01/312110023/status-offenders-1
(2012). Poverty status in the past 12 months : 2008 - 2012 American Community Survey. American FactFinder. http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF
(2012). ACS demographic and housing estimates: 2008 - 2012 American Community Survey. American FactFinder.http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF
(2012). Selected economic charachteristics : 2008 - 2012 American Community Survey. American FactFinder. http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF
(2010). Profile of general population and housing characteristics: 2010 Demographic profile data. American FactFinder. http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?src=CF
References
General Population Characteristics
Population by Age
Median Age (years) 39.0
16 years and over 20,990 (80.6%)
18 years and over 20,393 (78.3%)
21 years and over 19,448 (74.7%)
62 years and over 4,509 (17.3%)
65 years and over 3,642 (14.0%)

KY Median Age (years) 38.1
16 years and over 3,432,660 (79.1%)
18 years and over 3,315,996 (76.4%)
21 years and over 3,131,895 (72.2%)
62 years and over 722,724 (16.7%)
65 years and over 578,227 (13.3%)

Education Attainment
Disability
Income & Occupation Results
Unemployment
Rate of Poverty
Families Below Poverty Level
Single Parent Families
Race and Ethnicity
Rate of Adolescent Births
Rate of Low-Birth Weight Babies
Violence Statistics
Juvenile Crime Rates
Types of Crimes
Substance Abuse Statistics
Homicide -- 0
Attempted Homicide -- 0
Death Investigation -- 0
Sexual Assault -- 0
Sexual Offense - Other -- 4
Robbery - Individual** -- 45
Robbery - Commercial -- 0
Aggravate of Assault** -- 10
Assault - Other -- 146
Burglary - Commercial** -- 17
Burglary - Residential** -- 66
Theft -- 0
Fraud** -- 20
Shoplifting** -- 42
Theft - Other -- 196
Motor Vehicle Theft -- 36
Burglary from Motor Vehicle -- 48
Arson -- 0
DUI -- 0
Alcohol Violation -- 0
Drugs/Narcotics Violation -- 4
Disorderly Conduct -- 0
Traffic Incidents -- 0
Vandalism -- 0
Weapons Violation -- 0
All Other - Non-Criminal --173
All Other - Criminal -- 261
All Time Data

Records Uploaded: 44,251
Approved Records: 99%
Flagged Records: 1%
Date Range: Dec 31, 1969 to Nov 1, 2014


Data in Current View

Records in view: 4
Date range: May 16, 2014 to Oct 28, 2014


All Time Data

Records Uploaded: 44,251
Approved Records: 99%
Flagged Records: 1%
Date Range: Dec 31, 1969
to Nov 1, 2014

Data in Current View

Records in view: 254
Date range: Jan 26, 2014
to Oct 25, 2014
Based on this report, the crime rate in Kentucky for 2014 is expected to be higher than in 2012 when the state violent crime rate was lower than the national violent crime rate average by 23.88% and the state property crime rate was lower than the national property crime rate average by 6.78%.
Kentucky crime statistics andrate reports. (2012). http://www.cityrating.com/crime-statistics/kentucky/
Subject Number Percent

Total households 11,020 100.0
1 person household 3,453 31.3
2 person household 3,733 33.9
3 person household 1,777 16.1
4 person household 1,179 10.7
5 person household 533 4.8
6 person household 200 1.8
7+ person household 145 1.3
Average household size 2.35 X
Average family size 2.94 X

Housing Size (person per unit)
X - Not Applicable
The North Limestone Community Development Corporation (NoLi CDC) was founded in 2013 to execute the goals of the 2009 Central Sector Small Area Plan (CSSAP) and the 2011 North Limestone Sustainability Plan. All of our programs and projects are rooted in these two plans, and are centered around 6 areas of focus, derived from the CSSAP in
offering affordable housing, land trust, coordinate cultural programming, enhance public spaces, grow retail nodes, increase access to social services and address threats to neighborhood resources


NoLi Community
Development Corporation
Neighborhood Typology
"Due to its strong group identity, based on factors such as race, social class, age, and physical isolation, the parochial neighborhood has social integration, strong commitment to the locality, and a capacity to get things done without outside help. On the negative side, its functions for residents may be limited in resource procurement by the lack of linkages to the larger community."

- Fellin. (2001). The community and the social worker. pp. 138.
Parochial Community
Subject Number Percent
Occupied housing units 11,020 100.0
Owner-occupied housing units 6,370 57.8
Population in owner-occupied 14,815 X
housing units

Average household size 2.33 X
of owner-occupied units
Renter-occupied housing units 4,650 X
Population in renter 11,132 X
-occupied housing units

Average household size of 2.39 X
renter-occupied units

House Tenure
YEAR BUILT Occupied Housing Owner-Occupied Housing Renter-Occupied Housing
2010 or later 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
2000 to 2009 3.7% 3.7% 3.7%
1980 to 1999 6.9% 5.4% 8.9%
1960 to 1979 50.8% 48.8% 53.6%
1940 to 1959 29.9% 32.9% 25.8%
1939 or earlier 8.7% 9.2% 8.0%
Average Age and Condition of House
COMPLETE FACILITIES
With complete 99.5% 99.6% 99.3%
plumbing facilities
With complete 99.8% 99.6% 100.0%
kitchen facilities
HOUSE HEATING FUEL
Utility gas 66.5% 75.5% 54.2%
Bottled, tank, 0.9% 1.1% 0.5%
or LP gas
Electricity 31.7% 22.4% 44.6%
Fuel oil, kerosene 0.3% 0.1% 0.6%
Coal or coke 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%
All other fuels 0.6% 1.0% 0.0%
No fuel used 0.0% 0.0% 0.1%
MONTHLY HOUSING COSTS Occupied Housing Owner-Occupied Housing Renter-Occupied

Less than $100 0.1% 0.2% 0.0%
$100 to $199 1.9% 2.3% 1.4%
$200 to $299 6.0% 10.0% 0.5%
$300 to $399 8.8% 12.7% 3.4%
$400 to $499 10.7% 7.5% 15.1%
$500 to $599 11.6% 4.0% 22.1%
$600 to $699 8.6% 5.2% 13.3%
$700 to $799 8.9% 6.4% 12.4%
$800 to $899 9.6% 7.6% 12.4%
$900 to $999 9.6% 10.1% 9.0%
$1,000 to $1,499 18.5% 27.5% 6.1%
$1,500 to $1,999 3.2% 5.2% 0.5%
$2,000 or more 0.9% 1.5% 0.0%
No cash rent 1.6% X 3.9%

Median (dollars) 719 825 650
Median Housing Value
X - Not Applicable

County Estimate Kentucky Number
Population 18 to 24 years 2,071 416,492
Less than high school graduate 25.8% 16.1%
High school graduate (includes equivalency) 33.8% 33.2%
Some college or associate’s degree 38.4% 43.6%
Bachelor’s degree or higher 1.9% 7.1%

Population 25 years and over 17,628 2,902,296
9th to 12th grade, no diploma 15.0% 10.1%
High school graduate (includes equivalency) 34.5% 34.0%
Some college, no degree 22.6% 20.5%
Associate’s degree 6.1% 6.9%
Bachelor’s degree 8.8% 12.5%
Graduate or profession degree 4.2% 8.5%

Percent high school graduate or higher 76.2% 82.4%
Percent bachelor’s degree or higher 13.1% 21.0%

Population 25 to 34 year 3,326 563,435
High school graduate or higher 80.9% 88.2%
Bachelor’s degree or higher 15.7% 25.3%

Population 35 to 44 years 3,500 579,116
High School graduate or higher 78.9% 87.8%
Bachelor’s degree or higher 15.7% 24.4%

Population 45 to 64 years 7,228 1,176,668
High School graduate or higher 77.5% 84.5%
Bachelor’s degree or higher 11.7% 20.7%

Population 65 years and over 3,574 583,077
High School graduate or higher 66.4% 67.3%
Bachelor’s degree or higher 10.8% 14.0%

Less than high school graduate 14,235 3.122


DISABILITY STATUS Number

With any disability 5,268 8.2%
No disability 20,479
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 8.2%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 28.1%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line: 36.0%
Kentucky DISABILITY STATUS Number

With any disability 708,108
No disability 3,489,583

Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 9.2%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 28.0%
Less than 125% of the Poverty: Line: 36.7%

Occupation
OCCUPATION

Civilian employed population 16 years and over 11,498
Management, business, science, and arts occupations 2,251
Service occupations 3,054
Sales and office occupations 3,226
Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations 1,257
Production, transportation, and material moving occupations 1,710

INDUSTRY
Civilian employed population 16 years and over 11,498
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining 221
Construction 659
Manufacturing 1,130
Wholesale trade 187
Retail trade 1,499
Transportation and warehousing, and utilities 474
Information 360
Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing 435
Professional, scientific, and management, and administrative 1,066
and waste management services
Educational services, and health care and social assistance 2,807
Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodation 1,539
and food services
Other services, except public administration 768
Public administration 353

CLASS OF WORKER

Civilian employed population 16 years and over 11,498
Private wage and salary workers 9,228
Government workers 1,623
Self-employed in own not incorporated business workers 618
Unpaid family workers 29

INCOME AND BENEFITS (IN 2012 INFLATION-ADJUSTED DOLLARS) Estimated

Total households 10,885
Less than $10,000 1,133
$10,000 to $14,999 871
$15,000 to $24,999 1,937
$25,000 to $34,999 1,562
$35,000 to $49,999 1,846
$50,000 to $74,999 1,774
$75,000 to $99,999 1,023
$100,000 to $149,999 619
$150,000 to $199,999 32
$200,000 or more 88
Median household income (dollars) 34,596
Mean household income (dollars) 44,232

With earnings 8,499
Mean earnings (dollars) 41,504
With Social Security 3,451
Mean Social Security income (dollars) 15,354
With retirement income 2,291
Mean retirement income (dollars) 16,516

With Supplemental Security Income 879
Mean Supplemental Security Income (dollars) 8,528
Income
EMPLOYMENT STATUS Estimated
Population 16 years and over 20,411
In labor force 13,263
Civilian labor force 13,242
Employed 11,498
Unemployed 1,744
Armed Forces 21
Not in labor force 7,148

Number
Female householder, no husband present families 1,788
With related children under 18 years 1,129 (63.1%)
With own children under 18 years 894 (50.0%)
Under 6 years only 215 (12.0%)
Under 6 and 6 to 17 years 188 (10.5%)
6 to 17 years only 491 (27.5%)
Kentucky Household Types
Male householder, no wife present 82,545 (4.8%)
With own children under 18 years 41,976 (2.4%)
Female householder, no husband present 219,036 (12.7%)
With own children under 18 years 121,891 (7.1%)
LIVING ARRANGEMENT Estimated
In family households 20,402
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 7.6%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 19.7%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line: 28.5%

In married-couple family 13,077
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 2.9%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 12.0%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line: 21.2%

In Female householder, 5,679
(no husband present households)
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 19.2%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 38.3%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line: 44.1%

In other living arrangements 5,366
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 8.1%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 28.5%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line: 37.2%
Kentucky judges are jailing youths for truancy and other noncriminal offenses at one of the highest rates in the nation, sidestepping federal and state laws and ignoring the near-unanimous agreement of experts and advocates that it harms children.

Last year, more than 1,500 Kentucky children were sent to juvenile jails for such “status offenses” as missing school or running away from home — offenses that aren’t considered criminal and don’t apply to adults.

Although that’s roughly 200 fewer Kentucky children jailed than in the previous year, advocates and detention officials say the number is far too high and the practice is no way to treat children whose problems generally stem from abuse, neglect, poverty, mental illness or other social ills.
Yetter, D. & Riley, J. (2011). Status offenders: Kentucky among nation's leaders to jailing children. Courier-Journal. http://archive.courier-journal.com/article/20111211/NEWS01/312110023/status-offenders-1
The data you requested are not available.

Possible reasons include:
No data are available for the combination of geographic area(s) and other items in "Your Selections".
Selecting a table from a dataset that is currently being released on a flow basis, and the selected geographic area(s) have not yet been released.
Program- and dataset-specific reasons for data not being available:
American Community Survey - Data may not be available because the number of sample cases is too small.
The data you requested are not available.

Possible reasons include:
No data are available for the combination of geographic area(s) and other items in "Your Selections".
Selecting a table from a dataset that is currently being released on a flow basis, and the selected geographic area(s) have not yet been released.
Program- and dataset-specific reasons for data not being available:
American Community Survey - Data may not be available because the number of sample cases is too small.
Kentucky has the eighth highest teen birth rate at 41.5 births for every one thousand teenagers, ages 15 to 19.
(2014). New reports puts kentucky among states with highest teen births rate. WYKT: Lexington, KY. http://www.wkyt.com/news/state/headlines/New-report-puts-Kentucky-among-states-with-highest-teen-birth-rate-272002451.html
FERTILITY Estimated
Female 142,449
white alone, non - Hispanic 118,320
Black or African American 14,029
Hispanic or Latino 4,873

Female with a birth in the past 12 months 3.3%
White alone, non-Hispanic 3.0%
Black or African American 5.0%
Hispanic or Latino 3.3%
Approximately 5,000 premature, low birth weight babies are born in the Commonwealth every year. In fact, Kentucky’s rates of preterm baby deliveries and low birth weight babies are among the highest in the nation and have increased by nearly 20 percent over the last 10 years.
Campbell, A. (2009). Better beginnings for babies. University of Kentucky: Lexington, KY. http://www.uky.edu/base/webuk/archives/spot-183.html

Estimated
One race 24,793 (95.9%)
White 19,833 (76.7%)
Black or African American 4,472 (17.3%)
American Indian and Alaska Native 46 (0.2%)
Cherokee tribal grouping 4(0.0%)
Asian 109 (0.4%)
Chinese 72 (0.3%)
Vietnamese 11 (0.0%)
Other Asian 26 (0.1%)
Native Hawaiian and Other 9 (0.0%)
Pacific Islander
Samoan 9 (0.0%)
Some other race 324 (1.3%)
Results of One Race Affiliation

Estimated
Two or more races 1,056(4.1% )
White and Black or African American 765(3.0%)
White and American Indian and 84(0.3%)
Alaska Native
White and Asian 28 (0.1%)
Black or African American and 0(0.0%)
American Indian and Alaska Native
Two or More Race Affiliations
Race alone or in combination with one or more other races

Estimated
Total population 25,849
White 20,851(80.7%)
Black or African American 5,275 (20.4%)
American Indian and Alaska Native 130 (0.5%)
Asian 137(0.5%)
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 34 (0.1%)
Some other race 478 (1.8% )
Race Affiliation, Cont.
Estimated
Total population 26,040
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 2,382 (9.1%)
Mexican 1,905 (7.3%)
Puerto Rican 67 (0.3%)
Cuban 28 (0.1%)
Other Hispanic or Latino 382 (1.5%)
Not Hispanic or Latino 23,568 (90.9%)



Hispanic Population
Ages and Gender of Poverty
Population for whom poverty status is determined 25,768


SEX Estimated
Male 12,561
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 7.2%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 22.5%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line : 32.1%

Female 13,207
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 8.3%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 20.6%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line : 28.6%


AGE Estimated
Under 18 years 6,087
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 13.2%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 31.2%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line : 44.6%

Related children under 18 years 6,075
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 13.1%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 31.1%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line : 44.5%

18 to 64 years 16,119
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 7.0%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 21.1%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line : 28.6%

65 years and over 3,562
Less than 50% of the Poverty Line: 1.9%
Less than 100% of the Poverty Line: 6.9%
Less than 125% of the Poverty Line : 13.5%

With cash public assistance income 547(5.0%)
Mean cash public assistance income (dollars) 4,966
With Food Stamp/SNAP benefits 2,349(21.6%)
in the past 12 months
Welfare Services
EMPLOYMENT STATUS Estimated
Population 16 years and over 20,411
Art
Cultural Expression
Living Arts and Science
Center
The Night Market
Lexington Art League
Institute 193
Downtown Arts Center
Ann Tower Gallery
The Black Lodge
Artist Spaces at Griffin's Modern Hotel
Collexion
Holler Poet Series (Al's Bar)
Lexarts Inc.
Sayre School
Lexington Traditional Magnet School
STEAM Academy
Arlington Elementary
Transylvania University
Lexington Public Library
Carnegie Center
LuigART Makers Spaces
Schools and Libraries
Full transcript