Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Food And Drink

No description
by

Hanna Schmitt

on 22 January 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Food And Drink

Patrician And Plebeian Food And Drink
In Rome a way to show off your wealth was to have expensive food. The Patricians would have banquets, with numerous guests. In these banquets they would serve expensive food, such as roast peacock or ostrich. The rich patricians had kitchens in there homes, unlike the plebeians, so they could make and serve the good food.
The plebeians did not have as much money as the patricians, so they could not buy expensive food. Poor Romans would have less extravagant meals. A normal dinner consisted of chunks of fish, asparagus and a fig for desert. Since the poor did not have kitchens they would cook on small grills they owned.
Roman Foods And Feasting
Similarities
Even though the patricians and the plebeians usually ate different foods, they did have some similarities. Both the rich and the poor ate at "fast-food" restaurants called thermopolia. The main foods for both the rich and the poor were bread, beans, spices, a few vegetables, cheeses and meats. The favorite drinks were water and hot water with honey and herbs.

Odd Food That We Don't Eat today
The Romans ate some food that we still eat, such as cheeses and bread. But they also ate different, unique foods. Romans, particularly the patricians, ate mice cooked in honey, roasted parrots stuff with dates, giraffe, flamingo, salted jelly fish and snails dipped in milk.
Roman Markets
The patrician women, or their slaves, would go to get food for the family. Usually the shopping would be, before a dinner party. The markets had fruit, live rabbits, chickens, geese, baskets of snails, and cuts of meat. In the different booths there would be colorful animals life parrots and other birds to lure costumers into the shops.
Roman Food And Drink
Food and drink were a big part of daily Roman life. Type, cost and amount of food were different for different people. The Plebeians and the Patricians shared some similar food quality's and some differences.
Ancient Roman Egg Recipe
For medium-boiled eggs: Pepper, lovage, and soaked pine nuts. Pour on honey and vinegar; mix with garum fish sauce.

Source: Raimer, Carla. "Ancient Roman Recipes." PBS. PBS, 01 Nov. 2000. Web. 15 Jan. 2014.
Ancient Garum Recipe
Use fatty fish, for example, sardines, and a well-sealed (pitched) container with a 26-35 quart capacity. Add dried, aromatic herbs possessing a strong flavor, such as dill, coriander, fennel, celery, mint, oregano, and others, making a layer on the bottom of the container; then put down a layer of fish (if small, leave them whole, if large, use pieces) and over this, add a layer of salt two fingers high. Repeat these layers until the container is filled. Let it rest for seven days in the sun. Then mix the sauce daily for 20 days. After that, it becomes a liquid.
Source: Raimer, Carla. "Ancient Roman Recipes." PBS. PBS, 01 Nov. 2000. Web. 15 Jan. 2014.
Ancient Roman Libum (Cheese Cake) Recipe
Libum to be made as follows: 2 pounds cheese well crushed in a mortar; when it is well crushed, add in 1 pound bread-wheat flour or, if you want it to be lighter, just 1/2 a pound, to be mixed with the cheese. Add one egg and mix all together well. Make a loaf of this, with the leaves under it, and cook slowly in a hot fire under a brick.
Source: Raimer, Carla. "Ancient Roman Recipes." PBS. PBS, 01 Nov. 2000. Web. 15 Jan. 2014.
Ancient Roman Lucanian Sausage Recipe
Pepper is ground with cumin, savory, rue, parsley, condiments, bay berries, and garum. Finely ground meat is mixed in, then ground again together with the other ground ingredients. Mix with garum, peppercorns, and plenty of fat, and pine nuts; fill a casing stretched extremely thin, and thus it is hung in smoke.

Source: Raimer, Carla. "Ancient Roman Recipes." PBS. PBS, 01 Nov. 2000. Web. 15 Jan. 2014.
Full transcript