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Christopher Paul Curtis

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M Tiller

on 23 September 2013

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Transcript of Christopher Paul Curtis

CHRISTOPHER PAUL CURTIS
(Newbery Award-Winning author of "Bud, Not Buddy")

Christopher Paul Curtis
(Newbery Award-Winning Author of"Bud, Not Buddy")

Margaret Tiller
23 September 2013
Literature for the Child
Life Before Writing....
Earl "Lefty" Lewis (pitcher-Negro Baseball League)
Herman E. Curtis, Sr. (Herman Curtis and the Dusky Devastators of the Depression)
Common Themes In Curtis' Writing..
racial identity
civil rights
slavery
abolition
self-discovery
familial relationships
The Great Depression
The Harlem Renaissance
Flint, Michigan
Bud, Not Buddy

"Bud, Not Buddy" centers around a 10-year-old boy who escapes a foster home in search of his father. Though he ultimately never finds his father, Bud’s journey ends with feelings of acceptance. This piece of historical fiction takes place during the Great Depression. Jazz music and relationships play major roles in the story, along with Flint, Michigan, the hometown of Christopher Paul Curtis.
Reference List
AEI Speakers Bureau. (September 22, 2013). AEISpeakers.com: Christopher Paul Curtis. Retrieved September 22, 2013, from AEISpeakers.com.

Curtis, C.P. (2000). Newbery Medal
Acceptance. Horn Book Magazine, 76(4), 386.

Curtis, C.P. (1999). Bud, not Buddy.
New York: Random House Children’s Books.



Fisher Body Plant #1
General Motors Assembly Facility
13 years: the assembly line
the beauty of breaks
The University of Michigan-Flint
"The Jungle"
born May 10, 1953
Flint, Michigan
2nd oldest of 5 children
Leslie Jane Curtis (educator) and Dr. Herman Elmer Curtis (chiropodist)
Life BeforeWriting
Inspiration & Reaction
-Curtis notes that his grandfathers served as inspiration for the character of Bud.
-Incredible reaction: The book garnered a Newbery Award and a Coretta Scott King Award, among several other prestigious awards
Newbery Award Acceptance Speech
(2000)
"Several firsts are taking place here tonight, some very well known, others not so well known. Among the latter is: I’ve done quite a bit of research and I feel quite confident in saying that I’m the first person with dreadlocks to be presented with the Newbery.”


Newbery Award Acceptance Speech (2000)
“And to my children, Steven and Cydney, thank you for your contributions to both of the books. Steven, you are directly responsible for the “Watsons” going as smoothly as it did. You’re the best first reader an author could ask for. And Cydney, many people have told me that their favorite part of “Bud” is the song that you wrote. “Mommy Says No” is a classic, thank you so much.”

“A rite of passage for me occurred at the Flint Public Library. My siblings and I used to spend Saturday mornings at the library with my father. [...] One day Dad took David and Cydney into the youth section and told me to come with him. We walked across the hall into Adult Fiction and Dad said, “You’re a good enough reader to start here now.” From that day on I remember the pride and accomplishment I felt when on Saturdays we’d go to the library and David and Cydney would turn left into the world of Dr. Seuss and “Harold and the Purple Crayon” and I’d turn right into the world of Langston Hughes and Mark Twain.”

“A rite of passage for me occurred at the Flint Public Library. My siblings and I used to spend Saturday mornings at the library with my father. [...] One day Dad took David and Cydney into the youth section and told me to come with him. We walked across the hall into Adult Fiction and Dad said, “You’re a good enough reader to start here now.” From that day on I remember the pride and accomplishment I felt when on Saturdays we’d go to the library and David and Cydney would turn left into the world of Dr. Seuss and “Harold and the Purple Crayon” and I’d turn right into the world of Langston Hughes and Mark Twain.”

Newbery Award Acceptance Speech (2000)
“I’ve been involved with librarians my whole life, and I, just like Bud, have always known where to go for a sympathetic ear or for information or for the key to the magical world of books. Libraries and librarians have always played such an important role in my life.”

Other Award-Winning Books.....
"The Watsons Go to Birmingham--1963"
Newbery Honor Book
Coretta Scott King Award
"Elijah of Buxton"

Newbery Honor Book
Coretta Scott King Award
Inspiration
I could not find books "that were about me." -Christopher Paul Curtis
"The Watsons Go
to Birmingham--1963"
"Elijah of Buxton"
"Bud, Not Buddy"
Newbery Award Acceptance Speech (2000): A Youthful Rite of Passage
Reference List
Curtis, C.P.(2012).NobodyButCurtis.com: Christopher
Paul Curtis.Retrieved September 15, 2013, from www.nobodybutcurtis.com

Random House. (2013). RandomHouse.com
Christopher Paul Curtis.Retrieved September 16, 2013, from www.randomhouse.com





Full transcript