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UNITY AC 9 History - Industrial Revolution

Designed for teaching and learning of the AC 9 History depth study: The Industrial Revolution. It is presented in terms of its affect on the modern world and its influence on the current Information Technology Revolution.
by

Unity Humanities

on 9 July 2016

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Transcript of UNITY AC 9 History - Industrial Revolution

e·con·o·my
/ikänmē/ Noun
The wealth and resources of a country or region, esp. in terms of the production and consumption of goods and services.
Industrial Revolution
'Causes of the IR'
What was the Industrial Revolution?
REASON 1.
New technology in and mechanisation of farming from 1690
:
Example: Jethro Tull's (1674-1741) seed drill
REASON 2.
New ideas in farming
:
Examples: 4-field crop rotation & the "
enclosure system
"
REASON 4.
New technologies and harnessing new sources of energy
Examples:
James Watt
's steam engine, smelting iron with coal as the energy source
REASON 1.
natural resources
Examples: coal, iron, rivers, and sea ports
Why did the Industrial Revolution start in Britain?
REASON 3.
Available work force:
in·dus·try

(Definition)
/indstrē/ Noun

Economic activity concerned with the processing of raw materials and manufacture of goods in factories.
hand·made
/han(d)mād/ Adjective
Made by hand, not by machine.
REASON 2.
cap·i·tal
/kapitl/ Noun
Money to invest in business opportunities
10,000 years ago to less than 300 years ago...
In just the last 300 years...
REASON 3.
en·tre·pre·neurs
/än-tr-p(r)-nr/ Noun
A person who organizes, manages, and assumes the risks of a business or enterprise.
Urbanization:
the movement of people to the cities.
Daily life during Industrial Revolution (effects)
Geographic Effects
Social Effects
2. Creation of an Industrial Middle Class (bourgeoisie)
1. Creation of a Working Class (
proletariat
)
2. Factories become unsafe & unhealthy work places as
entrepreneurs
try to maximize profits
Examples:
no health or safety laws, children and women exploited (lower wages & working conditions)
Political/Economic Effects
4. labor unions established
Social Effects
Economic Effects
Economic Effects
3.
Laissez faire
policies result in no laws to restrict businesses. One result is that wealthy business owners
buy all their competitors and create monopolies. A
monopoly
means no competition.
Political Effects
1.
Utilitarianism

Idea that government should impose some restrictions on business to create a greatest good for the greatest number of people.
Political Effects
2.
Socialism

Idea that the people as a whole, rather than private individuals, should own the means of production (farms, factories, railroads, natural resources, and other sources of wealth in a nation)
Karl Marx wrote
The Communist Manifesto
in 1848 predicting a class struggle in which proletariat would win and create a classless, "communist" society - the ideal end result of socialism.
The world's first industry was the
TEXTILE INDUSTRY
tex·tile
/tekstīl/ Noun
Any type of cloth or woven fabric.


THINK ABOUT IT!
What kinds of things are made from woven cloth or fabric? And, how important is this in modern Australian society?
The world's first industry
Work Conditions
THINK ABOUT IT!
Where do you take part in the economy? Your parents?
THINK ABOUT IT!
What are 3+ things you use every day that were made in a factory?
THINK ABOUT IT!
What natural resources does Queensland (and Australia for that matter) have a lot of? And, why does China want so much of it?
THINK ABOUT IT!
Is Bothell mostly bourgeoisie, proletariat, or a mix of both?
THINK ABOUT IT!
What workers' rights might have been won by labor unions?
Hint: the hours you work!
THINK ABOUT IT!
What would you experience in a communist country today?
What other terms do we need to know before we dig into the Industrial Revolution?
From farms to factories - the industrial revolution begins...
Social Effects
3. The CLOCK becomes IMPORTANT

Factory work meant that people began to live their lives by the clock rather than by the rising and setting of the sun
THINK ABOUT IT!
Can you list 5+ events that require you to be somewhere at a certain time?
THINK ABOUT IT!
What might some results be if one company was the only place where you could buy a specific product?
Economic Effects
1.
Laissez faire
policies result in no laws to restrict businesses. One result is that wealthy business owners set up their
factories to maximize profits without regard for safety or the lives of the workers.
In urban areas, factory managers join doctors, lawyers, and small business owners in the bourgeoisie (middle class). Workers aspire to join the industrial middle class through promotions.
The unemployed and underemployed come to the cities for factory jobs and become a new social class - the
proletariat
- the industrial working class.
Examples: miners, mill workers, machinery operators...
What is the
Information Technology Revolution?
Information Technology Revolution
The development over the last 30 years of technologies specific to the making and sharing of information.

Examples:
- Innovations in telecommunications
- the invention and development of computers and the Internet
- the social media phenomenon
Information Technology Revolution
The development over the last 25 years of technologies specific to the making and sharing information.

Examples:
- Innovations in telecommunications
- the invention and development of computers and the Internet
- the social media phenomenon
REVIEW

What is the
Information Technology Revolution again?
If we define a REVOLUTION as
"
a sudden, rapid and significant social and/or political change
",
1. What might be the ingredients for revolution to occur? and...
2. What evidence is there that we are in the middle of an Information-Technology Revolution?
1965:
The Programma 101 was the first commercial "desktop computer", but today would usually be considered a printing programmable calculator.


In the 1970s:
Hewlett Packard introduced fully BASIC programmable computers that fit entirely on top of a desk, including a keyboard, a small one-line display and printer.

1976:
Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak sold the Apple I computer circuit board, which was fully prepared and contained about 30 chips.


2002
: More than 500 million personal computers were in use and one billion personal computers had been sold worldwide from the mid-1970s up to this time.


2014
: By the end of 2013, global smartphone penetration will have exploded from 5% of the global population in 2009, to 22%. That’s an increase of nearly 1.3 billion smartphones in four years.
On average, there will be two smartphones for every nine people on earth, or 1.4 billion smartphones, by the end of 2013.
(Business Insider Australia Website, 2014)
IT DEVELOPMENTS TO CONSIDER
Textile Industry before the Industrial Revolution
Working Conditions in the IR
Time to further organise my research...

Let's work out what information will go into my writing!
Organising your research ready to write
BONUS QUESTION

How might the study of this particular period of history have helped you better understand your life for the future?
ACTIVITY: Seminar
PREPARATION: Guiding Questions / Answer individually the following questions in preparation for later discussion!
1. Based on your analysis of the IR and its impacts on British society, what might be the impacts of the I-T Revolution on Australian society?

2. Who stands to gain or who lose?

3. What similarities might exist between the I-T Revolution and the Industrial Revolution based on your analysis?

4. Based on your analysis, how might the IR and IT Revolutions be seen as positive? Negative?


Sit with 4 people you would not normally sit with! (4 people per table)

Group members each discuss their responses to the Guiding Questions and decide whether the IR was a positive/negative change. and, whether the current I-T Revolution is a positive or negative change?
Have out your notes from/responses to the Guiding Questions! And...
Preparing and Communicating Historical Knowledge
From when and where can we trace its origin?
Let's take a look!
To the GLOSSARY!!!!!!!!
Link to Australian Curriculum:
The technological innovations that led to the Industrial Revolution, and other conditions that influenced the industrialisation of Britain (the agricultural revolution, access to raw materials, wealthy middle class, cheap labour, transport system, and expanding empire) and of Australia (ACDSEH017)-
Critical and creative thinking capabilities.
The population movements and changing settlement patterns during this period (ACDSEH080) -
Numeracy capabilities
The short and long-term impacts of the Industrial Revolution, including global changes in landscapes, transport and communication (ACDSEH082) -
Critical and creative thinking, intercultural, sustainability capabilities
The experiences of men, women and children during the Industrial Revolution, and their changing way of life (ACDSEH081) -
Personal and Social Capability; Ethical Understanding

NEW TECHNOLOGY:
Spinning Jenny
It is a multi-spool spinning frame. It was invented in 1764 by James Hargreaves in Stanhill, Lancashire, in England. The device reduced the amount of work needed to produce yarn, with a worker able to work 8 or more spools at once. This grew to 120 as technology advanced.
1. Find a world map online and add (snip) to notes circling Britain/United Kingdom as the place where the IR began
2.

Egalitarianism

The idea of 'equality amongst people', that all humans are equal in fundamental worth and status.
Link to Australian Curriculum:
The technological innovations that led to the Industrial Revolution, and other conditions that influenced the industrialisation of Britain (the agricultural revolution, access to raw materials, wealthy middle class, cheap labour, transport system, and expanding empire) and of Australia (ACDSEH017)-
Critical and creative thinking capabilities.
The population movements and changing settlement patterns during this period (ACDSEH080) -
Numeracy capabilities
The short and long-term impacts of the Industrial Revolution, including global changes in landscapes, transport and communication (ACDSEH082) -
Critical and creative thinking, intercultural, sustainability capabilities
The experiences of men, women and children during the Industrial Revolution, and their changing way of life (ACDSEH081) -
Personal and Social Capability; Ethical Understanding
FURTHER READING: Text pp. 133-140
3.

Nationalism

The belief that involves a person's identification with a 'nation'. Prior to the French Revolution (1789-99) and the American Revolution (1775-83) people really only thought of themselves/identified with their local village. Nationalism was enhanced by the ability to travel/move around as a result of the IR.
THINK ABOUT IT! What do you call yourself? Do you identify as a person from the Sunshine Coast? Queenslander? Australian? Why?
When did this begin?
1.
2.
3.
4.
Initial Consideration:
It is said that today we are living
through a technological revolution that
has dramatically changed the way we
communicate and process information.

All of the technology shown earlier has culminated in one device and require power. The telephone was invented in 1872
and remained largely unchanged
until the arrival of mobile phone
technology in the 1980s. Since the
late 1990s the development of smartphone
technology, touch screens, and
the ability to capture and transmit
images has revolutionised the way we
communicate with one another. But didn't people listen to music before the gramophone? Didn't people communicate before the telephone and computer? And, weren't people entertained before the television? Of course! The Industrial Revolution simply heralded a new age of convenience that would lead us to our very convenient - in terms of entertainment, products, and communication - world today!

For most of you these changes may
not seem very revolutionary. But for
your parents and grandparents they are remarkable and profound changes/advances in human communication.
Bringing it together...
Then...
Use evidence from your analysis and reference the Industrial Revolution wherever possible in your discussions!
Final Reflection...
Step 3.
Step 4.
Use examples from your analysis
of the IR to support your responses.
Further Reading on IR comparison to IT Revolution: Oxford Text pp.110-111.
This will help if you are stuck!
STEP 3. Note at least 3 significant points from this clip under the focus question heading you have created ...
Continue note-taking as practiced earlier: at least 3 significant points under the focus question heading while watching the clip ...
Key Focus Question 1/sub-heading:
CAUSE:
New technology and sources of energy
Entrepreneurs
built factories and used machines to replace the
"cottage system"
that had created textiles previously.
Don't forget your notes...
Aim for 5 QUOTES to add to your notes...
Key Focus Question/Sub-heading:
... Possibly the most obvious outcome of the Industrial Revolution in London was the resultant overcrowding. Rapid and relatively unplanned development led to swaths of tenements packed into irregular blocks, bounded by narrow streets covered with straw to dampen noise. There was also no spatial division between residential, commercial, and industrial structures. A housing development might bound a block of noisy, polluting factories or a prison. Even utilities were not relegated to the outskirts, as they are in today’s cities. Gasworks locations, which belched out smoke and foul odors, were scattered throughout the densely populated city center. Sewage systems did not exist for the first half of the era, and sewage dumped into the streets simply ran into the Thames. The creation of the Metropolitan Board of Works in 1855 and Joseph Bazalgette’s sewers led to improvements in sanitation, but many areas still lacked proper sewage...
Source: 'The Dust and Din and Steam of Town: London in Victorian Literature. Manu Venkateswaran '13, English 600J, Brown University (2010)
What manner of life is that which is described in these pages... The cold, wet, shelterless midnight streets of London; the foul and frouzy smelling dens, where vice is closely packed and lacks the room to turn; the haunts of hunger and disease, the shabby rags that scarcely hold together; where are the attractions of these things?
Source: Extract from the author's preface to OLIVER TWIST, Charles Dickens, published by Peter Fenelon Collier, New York, 1879
The IR led to a rapid growth in cities. In Great Britain, London's population boomed. Major factory centres such as Manchester and Birmingham also grew rapidly as prospective workers poured in looking for opportunities. The result was overcrowding and and appalling living conditions. Health risks multiplied as people lived in absolute squalor.
Source: Oxford Big Ideas 2013, Year 9 History. Oxford University Press. Australia. p.33
Skillbooster: 'Corroboration'
Categorise evidence from the sources below in your research as

three lists:
Corroborating evidence showing overcrowded London
Corroborating evidence showing poor living conditions
Things you don't understand or want to know more about.

1.
SOURCE: Victorian Slum, Modern World History: Interactive Textbook [online]
Skillbooster: 'Change & Continuity'
Now add
2 more columns
to your table (as below) and take evidence from Sources 7 & 8:
Evidence of
CHANGE
since the IR in terms of urbanisation (overcrowding and living conditions)
Evidence of
CONTINUITY
since the IR in terms of urbanisation (overcrowding and living conditions)
2.
3.
Source: Images of the Industrial Era [Online]. Available at: https://www.mtholyoke.edu/courses/rschwart/ind_rev/images/images-ind-era.html
4.
5.
9.
Source: Video of One Direction's 2012 song 'One Thing', filmed in modern London
Source: PBS documentary on 'Megacities'
LIVING CONDITIONS
DURING THE IR
backup
backup
EXTENSION
Continuity & Change: Has the IR reached all parts of the world equally?
Reflecting on the evidence...
10.
BBC (2013) 'The Children that Built the Victorian Britain'.
30minutes in total.
Introductory Key Focus Question?
Key Focus Question/Sub-heading:
Key Focus Question/Sub-heading:
Clip of Victorian London from the 1968 film 'Oliver'
glossary term
glossary term
glossary term
STEP 2. lets begin our research...
glossary term
note this key question as a heading for your inquiry
continue with the glossary table in your notes (continued throughout the inquiry)
LEARNING INTENTIONS:
CORE:
To be able to create a timeline from 1750-2015 that will include periods (chunks) within it.
Create a glossary (ongoing)
Understand the concept 'revolution'
PROFICIENT:

Understand the importance of chronology in the study of history
To be able to apply concept of ‘revolution’ to novel situations
EXPLORING:

Speculate on impact of technological developments for the future

SUCCESS CRITERIA:
Create a timeline with a ‘chunk’ embedded within
Have a glossary started with two accurate definition entries
LEVEL 1: DENOTATION (BASIC ANALYSIS)
List what you see
Our Historical Inquiry:
OPENING DISCUSSION USING THE THREE LEVEL ANALYSIS STRATEGY:
1. Firstly, describe what and who you see. 2. Secondly, guess what this might mean (what we can learn) 3. Are things different in modern Australia?
(SOURCE - A photo from the Industrial Revolution)

STEP 1. create a focus question from this topic heading for your research...
How will we do it?
SKILL: Chronology
HISTORICAL TERMS
'REVOLUTION': How do we best understand this rapid change?
'Life before the Industrial Revolution'
LEARNING INTENTIONS:
CORE:
To be able to set up a research journal for historical inquiry
SUCCESS CRITERIA:
Have a three column research journal begun with the first focus question and at least 6 IMPORTANT and RELEVANT points of information.
The Industrial Revolution occurred between the late 1700s and the early 1900s. Originating in Britain, it was characterised by the introduction of machines for laborious work, the replacement of animal labour with human labour and the widespread use of mineral resources. Broader changes involved the concentration of workers into factories, mills and mines, access to fast transport and the emergence of the middle class.

The First Industrial Revolution, which occurred in Britain in the late 1700s and later spread to Europe, was prompted by mechanisation (as cottage industries gave way to factories and mills), technology (as the steam engine came to replace human, wind and water power) and minerals (as iron became widespread and coal overtook wood as the favoured fuel source).

The Second Industrial Revolution, which began in the 1860s in Europe, the US and Japan, saw great strides in the production of steel, railroads, electricity and chemicals, and was characterised by the mass-production and mass-consumption of goods.
6.
PRACTICAL EFFECTS:
Limited wastage
quicker planting and harvesting
POLITICAL/SOCIAL EFFECTS:
Improved yields and profits
Reduced physical fatigue
reduced demand for labour
PRACTICAL EFFECTS:
More efficient
Better soil quality
Greater yields
POLITICAL/SOCIAL EFFECTS:
Food production doubled
Profits for the rich
Poverty among commoners
More hedges and roads appeared
Movement of people towards industrial (factories) towns for work
The Industrial Revolution was closely tied with the Agricultural Revolution that began in the early 1700s. Traditionally Britain had a series of small local economies rather than a single economic system. Advances in agriculture – including the enclosure movement that divided common fields into private plots – combined with new farming technologies and efficiencies resulted in an increased supply of food and raw materials for exchange. Farmers in Britain became the most productive in Europe, with the possible exception of the Netherlands, and farming for subsistence gave way to large-scale output for the purposes of trade.

Due to the availability of food, prices went down and living standards went up, with farmers able to exchange their surplus goods for new farming equipment, thus supporting manufacturers and further increasing production.
Links with the Agrarian (agricultural/farming) Revolution
HINT:
1. Highlight any key information relating to any of your focus questions so far and make dot points in your notes .
2. what are the periods or 'chunks' that can be added to out timeline?
Background 1...
Background 2.
EXTENSION: Case Study - Manchester
TASK INSTRUCTIONS:
The northern English city of Manchester demonstrates many aspects of the Industrial Revolution and therefore makes a good case study. In 1858 Chambers' Edinburgh Journal stated that 'Manchester streets may be irregular, … its smoke may be dense, and its mud ultra-muddy, but not any or all of these things can prevent the image of a great city rising before us as the very symbol of civilization, foremost in the march of improvement, a grand incarnation of progress'.

1. Make a summary by...
Reading through the list of primary and secondary evidence provided: http://www2.uncp.edu/home/rwb/manchester_19c.html
Completing the table to categorise your analysis of the historical evidence: http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/verve/_resources/htaa_year_9_ind_rev_Manchester_in_the_ind_rev.pdf

2. Examine the two paintings from the period shown to the left:
'Industrial Manchester from Kersal Moor', William Wylde, 1851 and 'Inaugural journey of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway', A.B. Clayton, 1830.
In what sense do the two paintings differ from each other in the impression they give of 1800s Manchester? (Historical interpretation)
Manchester (Britain's first industrial city) Population:
1774: 41,032;
1801: 70,000;
1831: 270,901;
1900: 600,000.


SOURCE: Briggs, Asa. "Manchester, Symbol of a New Age," Victorian Cities. New York and Evanston: Harper and Row, 1970 [original edition,1963): 88-89.
CAUSE:
Population boom + displaced peasants
SKILL: cause and effect
Further reading: text p.32
Background 3.
Millions of people migrated during the Industrial Revolution. Most travelled to find work, but some were transported for their crimes or migrated to escape Britain's poor living conditions. About a million Irish labourers fled the famine of the 1840s for England or North America. From 1701 to 1751 Britain's population went from 6.5 to 7.5 million, and by 1901 it was just under 40 million.

Australia was settled by Europeans during the Industrial Revolution. Convicts in the First Fleet benefited from the knowledge of navigation and diet that had emerged during the Scientific Revolution of the late 1800s. The first steam mill began operating beside Sydney's Darling Harbour in 1813 and steamships were to be found in New South Wales waters as early as 1830. In other Australian colonies ports operated from the early days of settlement and railways emerged during the 1850s.

The Industrial Revolution was closely associated with the development of capitalism, a system in which individuals own the means of production and attempt to maximise personal profit. Before then the economy was a combination of local industry and mercantilism (control of foreign trade by governments).
HINT: Highlight any key information relating to any of your focus questions so far (even past focus questions) and make dot points in your notes .
EFFECT:
Migration to cities creating work force for factories
=
LEARNING INTENTIONS:
By the end of this section of the inquiry I will...
CORE
:
Know the 4 main reasons/causes of the Industrial Revolution
Understand the historical concept ‘cause and effect’
Understand population movements and changing settlement patterns during the Industrial Revolution
Be able to demonstrate an organised and accurate strategy for note-taking

PROFICIENT:

Understand the practical and political/social effects of these changes
Evaluate the most influential cause of the IR

EXPLORING:

Understand how the practical and political/social effects of these changes influence our world today
SUCCESS CRITERIA:
I successfully...
Used an organized and accurate note-taking strategy to provide evidence of the 4 main causes of the Industrial Revolution
CONCEPT: CHANGE AND CONTINUITY
SKILLBOOSTER: 'Interpretation'
Background 5.
Textile manufacture changed dramatically in the 1700s. Key inventions such as Hargreaves' spinning jenny (1764), Arkwright's water frame (1769), Crompton's spinning mule (1779) and Cartwright's power loom (1784) reduced human labour by up to a third. Early models of these machines tended to be unreliable, and some looms were ruined by machine breakers as a statement against the replacement of human labour with machines.

The main centres of textile production in England became Greater Manchester, Lancashire and West Yorkshire. Leeds, for example, boasted around 170 'scribbling machines' (which prepare wool for spinning) by 1786; this had unfortunate consequences for workers, who signed a petition in that year stating that 'twelve men are thrown out of employ for every single machine used in scribbling'.

By 1830, over half of British exports consisted of cotton textiles. People began to favour the novelty and affordability of British garments over the high-quality Italian textiles that once dominated; France, too, struggled to keep up with British adaptability and ingenuity. India, which previously had the world's largest cotton industry, faced stiff competition from Britain until the early 1900s.
HINT: Highlight any key information relating to any of your focus questions so far (even past focus questions) and make dot points in your notes .
Background 4.
TRANSPORT
In the 1750s, stage coaches achieved an average speed of 5 miles per hour; by the 1790s this had risen to almost 7 miles per hour. By the 1780s there were 16 coach services going from London to Bath per week. A 1754 advertisement boasted: 'However incredible it may appear, this coach will actually arrive in London four days after leaving Manchester'. Consumer transport allowed city-dwellers to go to the countryside on weekends, partly making up for the pollution and stress of daily life.

By 1810 Britain had the world's most well-developed transport system, with 30,000 miles of navigable river, 1500 miles of horse-drawn railways (iron railways emerged in the 1730s) and 2000 miles of canals. Tar roads allowed people to travel readily between centres (as John Wesley did extensively in the late 1700s to spread his new religion of Methodism). Australia developed its transport systems relatively quickly, as it was settled at the time of the Industrial Revolution and tended to adopt new approaches readily.

IRON AND COAL
In the Industrial Revolution, coal replaced wood as the dominant form of fuel. This was partly because wood was becoming very expensive and hard to obtain on account of its overuse; Britain was beginning to rely on imports from Sweden and Russia.
In the mid-1700s, bar iron became available for small forges and by 1770 there were 6.5 million tons of coal mined every year. In 1783, a furnace was invented for producing wrought iron economically – it was used in train tracks, pipes and ships. Between 1788 and 1806 there was a 200% increase in production of crude iron, or pig iron (so named because of the shape of the moulds used).
HINT: Add any key information relating to any of your focus questions so far (even past focus questions) and make dot points in your notes. DON'T FORGET TO REFERENCE IT!
EFFECTS:
????
????
Complete this 'CAUSE & EFFECT' chart while watching the clip
=
SKILL: cause and effect
Pre-class viewing and preparation (
first 20 minutes only
):
1. What were the key names and inventions mentioned in Professor Clarke's lecture?
2. How did the majority of inventors discussed in the lecture end up, financially speaking?
SKILL: PERSPECTIVE
LEARNING INTENTIONS:
By the end of this section of the inquiry I will...
CORE:
Know the world’s first textile industry
Understand the historical concepts ‘change and continuity and apply to working conditions during the Industrial Revolution
Identify and analyse perspectives of people from the past: factory owners and workers
PROFICIENT:

Evaluate contemporary working conditions and compare to that during the IR

SUCCESS CRITERIA:
I successfully...
Used an organized and accurate note-taking strategy to provide evidence of the world’s first industry
Provided written evidence from a particular point of view (perspective) of working life in The IR.
Background 7.
DAILY LIFE
We need to be cautious when generalising about life during the Industrial Revolution, as experiences varied by region, industry and social class. Many literary and artistic representations characterise the era as harsh and ugly, with people and nature exploited relentlessly for personal profit. However, there were some benefits to daily life in the era. Along with improved transport that allowed people to get out of cities on weekends, a new consumer culture emerged in the cities, where people began to experience more opportunities for leisure and improved material comfort.

However, the new consumerism attracted its critics. Quakers, Methodists and others objected to the focus on material wealth – they also feared for the morals of society, with women and children coming into frequent contact with men in workplaces, and many mothers unable to care for their own children because of work demands. Indeed, the era is known for its many representations of moral and environmental decay.

POLITICAL REFORM
The Industrial Revolution was a time of political reform. The Chartists, who were partly influenced by the French Revolution of 1789, were particularly active in pursuing democratic rights. Their key demands were:
A vote for every man 21 years of age, of sound mind, and not undergoing punishment for a crime
The secret ballot
Abolition of the requirement that Members of Parliament (MPs) own a minimum amount of property
The payment of MPs
Constituencies (electorates) of equal sizes
Short-term or annual parliaments.

Due to the efforts of Chartists and others, several important acts of parliament enshrined rights now taken for granted. For example, the Great Reform Act of 1832 increased accountability and the numbers of people eligible to vote (though women and the majority of men were still excluded).
The 1867 Reform Act extended the right to vote by adding just under one-million voters, including workers, and doubling the electorate to almost two-million in England and Wales. Under the 1885 Redistribution Act, the electorate trebled and most agricultural labourers were given the franchise. Voting was starting to be viewed as a basic right – though women were not allowed to vote until 1918.
Australia was well ahead of its time in regard to political rights. The core Chartist demands and women's suffrage were adopted in Australia long before they were achieved in Britain.
HINT: Highlight any key information relating to any of your focus questions so far (even past focus questions) and make dot points in your notes .
Background 6.
During the Industrial Revolution in Britain there was high unemployment – up to 75% in some trades. For many of those that did work, life was extremely arduous. There are countless examples available of harsh working conditions, particularly in coal mines.

Working life changed in a number of ways. People had to attend work for regular hours every day, they had to maintain consistent physical effort to keep up with machinery, they were continually under the eye of supervisors and they worked in closer proximity to others than they had in the past. Children were said to have been more adaptable to the new demands, as well as cheaper to employ, and thus were a popular choice with employers.
Accounts of working life
KNOWLEDGE & UNDERSTANDING TASK - LOOK AT SOURCES 1 and 2:
1. Note down 5 things you learned from the sources about working in a coal mine during the IR in Britain.

APPLYING TASK - LOOK AT SOURCE SOURCES 3, 4 and 5:
2. Note down 3 things about working conditions that have changed - they are not the same (or not allowed) in modern Australian society today.

3. Why do you think these changes have taken place.

DESIGNING TASK
4. i. Go to the International Labour Organisation (ILO) website: http://www.ilo.org/global/topics/child-labour/lang--en/index.htm

ii. Find statistics to show whether child labour is continuing in the world or changing since the IR.

iii. As a news reporter, write an article or blog post explaining whether work conditions have improved (changed) or stayed the same (continuity) since the IR. Base your writing on:
the sources used earlier,
statistics from ILO
your own knowledge of work conditions in Australia
In groups of 3 or 4 examine the document 'Accounts of working life' and complete the tasks below.
DOCUMENT LINK:
http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/verve/_resources/htaa_year_9_ind_rev_accounts_of_working_life.pdf
+
+
=
Does yours look like this?
Global dominance over time - an EMPIRE. The IR provided Britain the technology to COLONISE the most countries around the world.

DISCUSSION
:
1. What might be the benefit of having these colonies all over the world?
2. What would you need to keep this empire?
3. Is there any evidence of this empire still existing today?
From this...
...to this in 100 years. Impressive?
Then it's as easy as 1, 2, 3!
SUCCESS CRITERIA:
I successfully...
Accurately identified Britain/United Kingdom on a world map
Provided evidence in the form of a flowchart of why the Industrial Revolution began in Britain.
LEARNING INTENTIONS:
By the end of this section of the inquiry I will...
CORE:
Know the three main reasons why the IR began in Britain/United Kingdom
Know Britain's geographical location in the world
Understand the concept 'empire' and 'imperialism'
PROFICIENT:

Understand the cyclical role of colonisation in Britain's industrialisation
EXPLORING:
Be able to make contemporary links to China's thirst for resources
Further reading: text pp.37-41
LEARNING INTENTIONS:
By the end of this section you will...
CORE

ORGANISE RESEARCH- Summarise relevant evidence and organise it into a logical sequence that addresses the Inquiry Questions ready for writing

DEVELOP HYPOTHESIS- Re-examine relevant evidence and use it to develop a working argument or hypothesis that addresses the Inquiry Question

COMMUNICATE HISTORICAL LEARNING - Use relevant evidence from your research to plan and draft an analytical essay using the TEEL framework that supports your hypothesis.
These could be discussed on your teacher's blog
Further reading: text pp.49-50
Go to your research now...

Grab three different coloured highlighters...

STEP 1.
Highlight with one colour at least 2 or 3 CREDIBLE points from your 'causes' notes/reflections that you would like to use in your FIRST BODY PARAGRAPH - CAUSES PARAGRAPH - as supporting evidence.

STEP 2.
With another colour, highlight with at least 2 or 3 CREDIBLE points from your 'Work Conditions' and 'Daily Life (effects)' notes/reflections that you would like to use in your SECOND BODY PARAGRAPH - EFFECTS PARAGRAPH - as supporting evidence.

STEP 3.
With the last colour, highlight with at least 2 or 3 CREDIBLE points from your 'IT Revolution' notes/reflections that you would like to use in your THIRD BODY PARAGRAPH - CHANGE/CONTINUITY PARAGRAPH - as supporting evidence.

You have just made your research ORGANISED and SYSTEMATIC!!!!
Create a table for your glossary which you will keep coming back to throughout this inquiry and in it define the concept 'revolution'
Unpacking the Inquiry Question:
1. From this, what do we already know?
2. What might we need to know/find out?
Making Connections:
CHANGE OR CONTINUITY?
SOURCE: Carrodus, G. & T. Delany, B. Howitt, R. Smith, C. Young. (2012) Oxford Big - History 9. Oxford University Press. Australia. pp.112-113.
Teacher Checkpoint!
Self/Peer Reflection checkpoint!
The first learning intention was:
ORGANISE RESEARCH- Organise relevant/credible evidence and organise it into a logical sequence that addresses the Inquiry Questions ready for writing
1. Have you done this to the best of your ability?
2. Swap your work with a classmate and ask if he/she has advice for improvement
Check with your teacher to see if your are ready to proceed to PLANNING STAGE!
How Do We Write Analytical Essays?
STEP 1: Developing an argument/hypothesis
But what is it?
After the research...
DEFINITION:

Hypo = 'under'
Thesis = 'proposal'
Hypothesis =
'Underlying proposal'

Therefore, an hypothesis is...
a proposal which attempts to explain the reason(s) for an event or situation

An informed judgement which is debatable

A statement which can be supported by evidence and logical argument

For example...
Event or situation:
Jack and Jill went up the hill

Reason
To fetch a pail of water.

The Australian national character is seen as determined and courageous today

because of the horrific experiences of the ANZACs in World War I.
An hypothesis is NOT ...
Jack and Jill went up the hill so they could go up the hill.
The ANZACs are remembered as being brave because of their courage.
It cannot just state an indisputable fact. For example,
Jack and Jill went up the hill.
Australians fought bravely in World War I.
It cannot be an inevitable consequence . eg
An hypothesis is debatable
There must be other possibilities. For example,

I think Jack and Jill went up the hill to keep fit.
Jack and Jill went up the hill because they are idiots!
The ANZACs were inspirational.

Jack and Jill may have gone up the hill to watch the sunset.
They may have gone up the hill to escape a flood.
Australians might be lazy because the war was really easy to win.
It cannot be an opinion (which cannot be argued):
Your hypothesis is YOUR ESSAY'S FOCUS...
Everything you include in your essay will relate to proving the hypothesis in some way.

Each focus question will lead to a conclusion which helps prove the hypothesis.

You will state the hypothesis in the introduction and conclusion.

Your turn ...
1. KEY INQUIRY QUESTION:
Does chocolate in all its forms have any positive health benefits?
2. Essay Question:
Which aspect of daily life had the most influence on society in the Middle Ages?
For example,
Even though they were enemies, the soldiers on both sides of the
Gallipoli campaign in Turkey

during WWI in 1915

had a mutual respect for each other's fighting spirit.
YOUR HYPOTHESIS WILL HAVE THREE BASIC INGREDIENTS:
1. CHRONOLOGY ELEMENT (TIME/DATE)
2. GEOGRAPHICAL ELEMENT (PLACE)
3. ARGUMENT THAT IS DEBATABLE
Below are two Key Inquiry questions for you to practice making hypothesis. Work in groups of three to come up with them.
Then, you will be asked to make your own hypothesis for YOUR essay.
REMEMBER: the 3 ingredients
CHECK YOUR HYPOTHESIS:
Whilst most chocolate types have only negative health effects, dark chocolate has been found in modern times by scientists in the United States to have some positive health benefits.
CHECK YOUR HYPOTHESIS:
Although there were many important influences on European society in the Middle ages, religion was the most significant because of the power and control it held over the people.

OUR ESSAY KEY INQUIRY QUESTION...

Self/Peer Reflection Checkpoint!
1. Does your hypothesis have all the ingredients?
2. Check a classmates... any advice for improvement?
Teacher Hypothesis Checkpoint!
Check with your teacher to see if your hypothesis is ready for writing...
LEVEL 3: MEANING (THINKING DEEPLY AND MAKING CONNECTIONS) Hypothesize...
What might this mean for the world in the future?
LEVEL 2: CONNOTATION (DEEPER ANALYSIS)
What is the pattern here?
THREE LEVEL ANALYSIS STRATEGY:
Think Pair Share
i. What or who might each of these be?
ii. How might they relate to each other?
iii. How would life be different without each of these?

Task:
In groups of 3, DESIGN a timeline starting from 1750 and finishing THIS YEAR. What increments might be best to go up in?
Now, add a period or 'chunk' within the timeline titled IT Revolution spanning from 1965 to THIS YEAR. You'll be filling this section out from the information in the next Zoom
Also, don't forget to add your birthdays! :)

NOTE
: you will be adding to this throughout this inquiry!

Working historically, first try to work out the following on your own. Then, discuss with your partner...

1. What is the time of day (morning, afternoon, evening)?
2. Where is the event happening (city, village, countryside, other)?
3. In what type of district is the event happening (residential, industrial, retail, other)?
4. In what type of building do these people appear to be located (household, office, shop, factory, other)?
5. What technology is displayed here? And what might power it?
6. What is the social status of the people (poor, well-off, other)?
7. How do the people appear to be feeling (determined, happy, sad, angry, anxious, other)?
8. In which country might this event be happening?
9. Roughly how long ago would this event have happened (200years, 100 years, 50 years, 20 years, recently)?

Think:Pair:Share - GETTING STARTED: A PHOTO FROM THE PAST
You are visiting your grandparents house. You have just found a photo in the house that nobody has seen before! What could it mean about our past? Look at the photo here.
Interpretation:
using clues from the evidence to make assumptions (Big room with a machine that has rolls of thread >>> textile/clothes factory)
Application of prior knowledge:
using clues in conjunction with what you already know to make assumptions (your knowledge of facial expressions >>> Unhappy child in shabby clothes working under the strict eye of an adult - like what I've seen in the movie 'Oliver Twist' >>> England in the Industrial Revolution)
Tentative answers:
you can't be sure that your answers are correct (suspenders worn in other countries too >>> Germany, USA, Australia???)

All three features are typical of historical inquiry. Keep them in mind as you continue through!
Now, as a class discuss: When answering these questions, you might have noticed three things:
What happened?
Why did it happen?
What were the consequences?

Before you realised that historical investigation involves interpretation and tentative knowledge, therefore, the historian would also keep two other questions in mind:

How do I know?
Am I certain of my conclusions?

A good idea is to also devise a
KEY QUESTION
to keep your investigation focused. When first thinking about the IT Revolution before, and now thinking about the children working in poor conditions in a factory depicted in the earlier photos, a key question could be:


Having decided that the event is worth investigating, what can an historian (or history student) do? An historian (or history student), when deciding that an event is worth investigating, would usually start by asking three questions:
Now that we've scratched the surface, let's dig a little deeper.
So... if this is work, what is the worst job in the world?
The majority of the population must be unhappy with the old way of life or doing things.

The majority of the population must be willing to bring about RAPID change.

The change that comes must be able to make the majority of people more happy.
SOURCE: Ashton & Anderson (2012) History 9: The Making of the Modern World. Macmillan. p.27
SOURCE: Ashton & Anderson (2012) History 9: The Making of the Modern World. Macmillan. p.27
Add these key dates to the timeline
Peer Feedback
Opportunity
CRITERIA - CLEAR EVIDENCE OF:
Knowledge of the 4 main causes of the Industrial Revolution
Understanding of the historical concept ‘cause and effect’
Understanding of population movements and changing settlement patterns during the Industrial Revolution
Ablility to demonstrate an organised and accurate strategy for note-taking
EXCELLENT
SOUND
Tips for improvement
For each criteria tick either EXCELLENT, SOUND or give TIPS FOR IMPROVEMENT
NOTE: thumbs up are for marking in your peers' work - two great things that the marker recognises and the thought bubble is a suggestions/recommendation
Peer Feedback
Opportunity
For each criteria tick either EXCELLENT, SOUND or give TIPS FOR IMPROVEMENT
NOTE: thumbs up are for marking in your peers' work - two great things that the marker recognises and the thought bubble is a suggestions/recommendation
EXCELLENT
SOUND
TIPS FOR
IMPROVEMENT
CRITERIA - CLEAR EVIDENCE OF:
Used an organized and accurate note-taking strategy to provide evidence of the
world’s first industry
and the
concept: CHANGE/CONTINUITY
Provided written evidence from a particular
point of view (perspective)
of working life in The IR.
SUCCESS CRITERIA:
I have successfully.
.
Organized my research into a logical format
Developed an hypothesis/argument from the Inquiry question
Written an analytical essay that,
has a clear introduction with hypothesis and key ideas (from the focus questions)
has paragraphs that address each focus question
uses the TEEL framework
overall, answers the hypothesis/essay argument

Craft these into your next focus question
3 level analysis:
LEVEL 1. LITERAL UNDERSTANDING (Denotation)
>>> List what you see
LEVEL 2. DRAWING CONCLUSIONS (Connotation)
>>> Are there any patterns? What conclusions can we draw (what can we learn from this)?
LEVEL 3. APPLYING KNOWLEDGE (Meaning)
>>> to what extent would does this support the argument that 'Britain is best suited to industrialize fastest.'
THINK ABOUT IT!
Do you think it would have been easy to be an ENTREPRENEUR? Have a go!

1. Play who want to be a cotton industry millionaire: http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/victorians/launch_gms_cotton_millionaire.shtml
2. note down 5 things you have learned about the being a cotton industry entrepreneur during the IR (FROM A FACTORY OWNER'S PERSPECTIVE)
SOURCE: Joseph Sitko PhD. 2003 'Life Before the Industrial Revolution', [online] Produced by United Learning, cited on YouTube Channel, 2009 and accessed on 01/01/14
SOURCE: KTC Channel 'The Industrial Revolution', [online] Produced by KTC, cited on YouTube Channel, 2014 and accessed on 01/01/14
SOURCE: History Teachers Association of Australia, 2014. 'The Industrial Revolution: 1750-1914'. [online] History Teachers' Association of Australia website: http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/unit-program/y8-industrial-revolution-overview.html. Accessed 01/01/2015)
SOURCE: History Teachers Association of Australia, 2014. 'The Industrial Revolution: 1750-1914'. [online] History Teachers' Association of Australia website: http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/unit-program/y8-industrial-revolution-overview.html. Accessed 01/01/2015)
SOURCE: History Teachers Association of Australia, 2014. 'The Industrial Revolution: 1750-1914'. [online] History Teachers' Association of Australia website: http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/unit-program/y8-industrial-revolution-overview.html. Accessed 01/01/2015)
SOURCE: History Teachers Association of Australia, 2014. 'The Industrial Revolution: 1750-1914'. [online] History Teachers' Association of Australia website: http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/unit-program/y8-industrial-revolution-overview.html. Accessed 01/01/2015)
SOURCE: History Teachers Association of Australia, 2014. 'The Industrial Revolution: 1750-1914'. [online] History Teachers' Association of Australia website: http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/unit-program/y8-industrial-revolution-overview.html. Accessed 01/01/2015)
SOURCE: History Teachers Association of Australia, 2014. 'The Industrial Revolution: 1750-1914'. [online] History Teachers' Association of Australia website: http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/unit-program/y8-industrial-revolution-overview.html. Accessed 01/01/2015)
SOURCE: History Teachers Association of Australia, 2014. 'The Industrial Revolution: 1750-1914'. [online] History Teachers' Association of Australia website: http://www.achistoryunits.edu.au/unit-program/y8-industrial-revolution-overview.html. Accessed 01/01/2015)
SOURCE: Ashton & Anderson (2012) History 9: The Making of the Modern World. Macmillan. p.27
SOURCE: Great Matthew Boulton and James Watt's Steam Engine : Why Industrial revolution started only in Britain. BBC. [online] Available on YouTube at:
SOURCE: Ashton & Anderson (2012) History 9: The Making of the Modern World. Macmillan. p.31
4 field rotation of crops allows nutrients to regenerate in the soil, especially if one field was left fallow (empty).
In your notes... ILLUSTRATE how technological innovations in the textile industry led to the Industrial Revolution from this diagram.
SOURCE: Ashton & Anderson (2012) History 9: The Making of the Modern World. Macmillan. p.27
CORE ACTIVITY:
As you go through this section on the causes of the IR,
take dot points notes on the information in this section and record your thinking too in Document 3.

EXTENSION ACTIVITY:
Add an 'extent barometer'
next to each of the four causes in Document 3 to EVALUATE how influential each cause was in starting the IR (see example below).
INSTRUCTIONS:
Example

of Extent Barometer mind-map
that assesses the extent to which the high Australian dollar has adversely affected the Australia economy
EXTENSION:
SOURCE: The Steam Machine changes the world', [online] Produced by Its History, on YouTube, accessed on 01/01/14. Available on Youtube
SOURCE: Joseph Sitko PhD. 2003 'Life Before the Industrial Revolution', [online] Produced by United Learning, cited on YouTube Channel, 2009 and accessed on 01/01/14
Source
Notes/Quotes/Source info
reflections/my thoughts (analysis & CUP evaluations)
FOCUS QUESTION:
______________________________________
What was life like before the Industrial Revolution?
Large amount of poor / small amount of rich
No machines >>> Quiet = pace of life slow
No cars >>> people didn't travel much
9/10 people lived rural areas
little/no education
>>> Very different to today with or reliance on tech. and machines
>>> without cars it would take a long time to get anywhere
>>> I would guess that 9/10 Australians get education n can read today = big change
>>> Today in Australia n Britain most people are not poor
FOR EXAMPLE...
LEARNING INTENTIONS:
By the end of this section of the inquiry I will...
CORE:
Know some of effects of the IR on daily life
Understand the concept of
CORROBORATION
Be able to identify the
ORIGIN
,
PURPOSE
and
CONTEXT
of primary and secondary sources using the
CUP EVALUATION STRATEGY

PROFICIENT:
Understand the concept of
INTERPRETATION
and understand how this may affect our knowledge of the past.
Craft a focus question from this topic in your books.
SUCCESS CRITERIA:
I successfully...
Created a table of
CORROBORATED
evidence
Evaluated primary and secondary evidence in terms of
CREDIBILITY
and
UTILITY
(usefulness)
Lecture and Class Discussion (optional)
Corroborating evidence showing overcrowded London
Corroborating evidence showing poor living conditions
Questions. Things you don't understand or want to know more about.
FQ: ______________________
CORROBORATION:
The same information in more than one historical source
Lastly, let's reflect on and EVALUATE the sources examined here. In accordance with our CUP EVALUATION SYSTEM,
rate each of the 8 sources out of 5 for
CREDIBILITY
(is the source reliable and believable?),
rate each of the 8 sources out of 5 for
USEFULNESS
(is the source useful to historians like you in studying this period of history)
- The source was produced by a professor (PhD) and therefore is very CREDIBLE/reliable/believeable

- Contains USEFUL statistics
WORKSHOP 1
After you have an hypothesis/argument ...
WORKSHOP 2
How Do We Write Analytical Essays?
STEP 2: Plan your essay out well
Making a essay plan...
All essays contain the same ingredients...
Getting started...
2. You will now receive a planning document to fill out. This will be your essay plan :) NOTE: you will need to refer to your research!
1. Take a look at the key points on planning your essay here in this clip...
SELF/PEER Reflection Checkpoint!
Refer to your task sheet...
Refer to your task sheet...
Refer to your task sheet...
Have you completed a detailed essay plan with
Introduction (hypothesis and 3 key points)
Paragraphs (topic sentences, evidence to be included) and linking sentences)
Teacher Checkpoint!
Check with your teacher to see if your plan is ready for drafting...
Now that the research is almost done...
Let's reflect &make connections...
Respond in your notes...
Respond in your notes
Respond in your notes
2. Let's begin a flowchart in your notes in order to answer this question.
Your teacher will give you a flowchart template for this task :)
After you have planned... its time to write!
How Do We Write Analytical Essays?
WORKSHOP 3
STEP 3: Stick to your planning and write according to the TEEL framework
Writing your introduction...
Your introduction covers the topic of your essay... It is like a ROAD MAP for the rest of the essay. It is structured as follows:
3. List the key arguments/points that you will make - each of these will be a body paragraph.
Finish the following sentences:
'
Firstly this essay will discuss...

(causes: changes in technology etc.)'.
Secondly, this essay will examine ...
(effects: working and living conditions)'.
And lastly, the essay will compare...
(comparison to IT Rev. as historical continuity).
1. Introduce the topic and related key terms - Industrial Revolution
Finish the following sentences:
'
The Industrial Revolution began ...
'
'The Industrial Revolution was a revolution because ...' Just like this, we are currently living through a revolution of our own - the Information Technology Revolution. The IT Revolution is...
'
2. Introduce your hypothesis/argument:
Finish this sentence:
'
This essay with argue that ...
'
How do we structure the body paragraphs?
Your teacher will give you a scaffold worksheet to complete each body paragraph.

NOTE:
1. You need to mention in your writing where information is coming from. Some examples of how you can do this include:

‘According to the historian Peter Williams ...’
‘The depiction of workers during the Industrial Revolution in ...’
'Experiences in Charles Dicken’s book and film adaptation 'Oliver' shows that ...’
2. You need to 'in-text reference' when you use evidence from your research:
>>> (author surname, year of publication)
>>> (Smith, 2015)
How do we conclude?
Begin by restating your hypothesis.
Finish this sentence:

'In conclusion, this essay has argued that ...'
Then, restate the key points that you have addressed throughout your essay.
Finish these sentences:
'
Firstly, in support of the central argument, this essay discussed that ...

(causes: changes in technology etc.)
'.
Secondly, this essay examined ...

(effects: working and living conditions)
'.
And lastly, the essay compared ...
(comparison to IT Rev. as historical continuity)
.
NOTE:
Your essay will ALWAYS be in the third person. This means that you will NEVER use 'I'!
In-text reference throughout the essay
Include a bibliography (can be done in Word automatically)
Include photos, statistics in an APPENDIX
Conclude on a strong note. Maybe give your prediction for the future, or end on a very relevant quote that leaves the reader thinking. But REMEMBER, never introduce any new evidence in the conclusion. YOUR TURN NOW!
SELF/PEER FEEDBACK CHECKPOINT!
Refer to your task sheet:
Have you completed your draft with:
Introduction; Body Paragraphs; Conclusion.
TEACHER DRAFT FEEDBACK CHECKPOINT!
Email your draft to your teacher at this point... He/She will give you personalised feedback
ACCORDING TO THE CRITERIA SHEET
which you will be expected to address in the following week of editing.

If you are unsure of any feedback advice from your teacher, email or use class time to conference and discuss for clarification >>> Use all the help/advice from your peers and teacher to improve your work! WORK HARD AND YOU WILL IMPROVE!
Some children, called scavengers, had Jobs such as cleaning the
machines while they were still working, which was very dangerous

Children working down mines during the IR
NOTE:
Not all your research will make it into the essay... and thats ok!
But, Where to next?
The 'Internet of Things' - what are the benefits?
ACTIVITY - Pros:Cons:Questions (P:C:Q)
The 'recipe' for rapid change...
How did our major technological change start?
Another photo of children working in a similar place at a similar time
Is this event worth investigating?
All events are probably important to the people involved. But historically, some events are more important than others. The event depicted in the photo seems interesting: however, you will need to look further in order to decide whether it is important historically.
Look at the next photo to the left. You might notice
that the children are standing on the factory machines working without any protective footwear.
You can imagine how noisy the machines would have been >>> effects on hearing?
They are not going to school
They are NOT being supervised or helped by adults

Now, read below the section from a report commissioned by the British House of Commons in 1832 on working conditions throughout industrial England.
Would any of this be possible today? Why? What has changed and how did this change come about? >>> worth investigation
"abandoned from the moment that an accident occurs; their wages are stopped, no medical attendance is provided, and whatever the extent of the injury, no compensation is afforded." (British House of Commons 1832)
SEE DOCUMENT 2
SEE DOCUMENT 1
SOURCE 1: Joseph Sitko PhD. 2003 'Life Before the Industrial Revolution', [online] Produced by United Learning, cited on YouTube Channel, 2009 and accessed on 01/01/14
You will need to have open 'Document 3' for this section...
Key Focus Question 2/sub-heading:
LEARNING INTENTIONS:
By the end of this section of the inquiry I will...
CORE
:
KNOW what was the INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION.

PROFICIENT:

UNDERSTAND 'utility' of historical evidence in answering inquiry questions


SUCCESS CRITERIA:
I successfully...
Worked in a group to categorise evidence based on the concept 'utility' (Utility Activity);
Completed research tables in Document 2 (with at least two entries in each table)
See your teacher for all the resources and instructions.
'UTILITY' Activity
Document 3 continued...
3 Level Analysis Opportunity:
In Document 4, complete the '3 Level Analysis' of William Bell Scott's painting - 'Iron and Coal' (1855-60)
VIEWING: BBC (2013) Why did the IR first happen in Britain?
So... what has changed?
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2df9zb_bbc-panorama-apple-s-broken-promises_tv
7.
A cartoon drawn in the 1880s at the height of a cholera epidemic (Punch Magazine)
During the first decade of the Victoria's reign, baths were virtually unknown in the poorer districts and uncommon anywhere. Most households of all economic classes still used "privy-pails"; water closets (flush toilets) were rare. Sewers had flat bottoms, and because drains were made out of stone, seepage was considerable. If, as was often the case in towns, streets were unpaved, they migfht remain ankle-deep in mud and sewerage for weeks.

SOURE: Taken from the internet site 'Victorian Web' 2002
8.
Let's get active!
We will play the 'Envelope Game'. After you play the game, discuss your learning with the class >>> note down how the this activity helped you understand the 'cottage industry'
To do as you watch:
Note down anything that you find particularly interesting
Note down anything that shocks you
To do after you watch:
Discuss and share your notes with your peers and explain why you were 'interested' and/or 'shocked'
Note at least 3 points that show 'change' to work conditions in modern Australia - why doesn't this still happen in modern Australian society?

What changed as a result of the Industrial Revolution?
ASSESSMENT: You will later dig deeper and explore one of the following in an essay.
Full transcript