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Poetry

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by

Lesley Wray

on 15 January 2013

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Transcript of Poetry

O Captain! My Captain! O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;





O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up- for you the flag is flung- for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreathes- for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning; Thematic Connection Power, Politics, and Poetry Killing Lincoln by: Bill O'Reilly
Lincoln is assassinated after leading the Union to its victory in the Civil War.
More literal portrayal of Lincoln's death
Mockingjay by: Suzanne Collins
Although the revolution succeeds, Prim is killed.

Portent by: Robert William Service
Explains an oncoming war Sonic Analysis Tonal Analysis Artistic Connection Walt Whitman
contrast between positive connotations in first half of stanza and negative ones in second contributes to bittersweet tone

Parallelism: lines begin the same way to establish the flow of the poem
Repetition: phrases repeated for emphasis
Rhyme: words sounding similar to create flow
Diction: word choice that affects tone
Imagery: words used to describe
Anaphora: The repetition of one or more words at the beginning of phrases

Sensory responses:
sounds in beginning of stanza feel relaxed and associated with contentment
short and fast-paced sounds in second half of stanza feel alarming and attention-grabbing
invoke sense of panic in reader, who relates to narrator’s despair. The poem relates to sacrifices made in a struggle, which are represented by the martyred captain.
Even when achieving a victory, one can experience great loss. Instructions:
first four lines of the first stanza should be triumphant
"the prize [the crew] sought is won"
narrator is explaining how the trip went extremely well
second group of four lines should be read mournfully
though the trip went well, the captain of the ship has "[f]allen cold and dead"

first four lines of the second stanza should be deparate
celebration is for the captain, "for [him the people] call"
next four lines should repeat the mournful tone
narrator repeats that the captain is dead

first four line of the last stanza should be read with an understanding tone
narrator finally accepts that his captain "has no pulse nor will"
next four lines should once again repeat the mournful tone
narrator repeats for the last time that the captain is dead My Captain does not answer, his lips pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with objects won; But O heart! heart! heart! O the bleeding drops of red, Where on the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead. Here Captain! dear father! The arm beneath your head! It is some dream that on the deck, You've fallen cold and dead. Exult O shores, and ring O bells! But I with mournful tread, Walk the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead. O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;





O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up- for you the flag is flung- for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreathes- for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;





My Captain does not answer, his lips pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with objects won; But O heart! heart! heart! O the bleeding drops of red, Where on the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead. Here Captain! dear father! The arm beneath your head! It is some dream that on the deck, You've fallen cold and dead. Exult O shores, and ring O bells! But I with mournful tread, Walk the deck my Captain lies, Fallen cold and dead. Triumphant Mourning Desparate Mourning Understanding Mourning •Bittersweet theme; the voyage is a success, but the captain is killed
A major figure is lost as a consequence of a successful struggle.
•Universal: War, Assassination, Massacre
These are bittersweet because while they might be for a good cause, lives are lost as a consequence.
•Personal: Moving, Death of someone who struggled with illness
Moving is usually for the benefit of the household, but the individuals lose their connections with the people and environment
Death of a sick person: the person no longer has to endure his or her disease, but his or her loved ones have to cope with their loss. Novels: Poems: Visual Art: Passion of Jesus Christ Represents both death and Jesus's willingness to sacrifice to redeem humanity from its sins Giotto di Bondone. Lamentation. 1305-1306.

Jesus's friends and family mourn his death after he completes his sacrifice. Leonardo da Vinci. The Last Supper. 1495-1498. Michelangelo. Pieta. 1498-1499. Mary responds to Jesus's death with a combination of sorrow and acceptance. Jesus accepts his duty and bids farewell to his Apostles Music: "The Star-Spangled Banner"
By Francis Scott Key "And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there." The soldiers successfully defend their freedom despite casualties. Works Cited Esaak, Shelley. "Leonardo da Vinci - The Last Supper." Art
History Resources for Students, Enthusiasts, Artists and Educators - Artist Biographies - Art Timelines - Images and Picture Galleries. About.com, n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. <http://arthistory.about.com/cs/leonardo/a/last_supper.htm>.

"Giotto, Lamentation - Smarthistory." Smarthistory: a
multimedia web-book about art and art history. Khan Academy, n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. <http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/giottos-lamentation.html>.

Service, Robert William. "Portent - Poem by Robert William
Service." Famous Poets and Poems - Read and Enjoy Poetry. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. <http://famouspoetsandpoems.com/poets/robert_william_service/poems/12444.html>.

"Star Spangled Banner Whitney Houston -
YouTube." YouTube. YouTube, LLC, 19 Jan. 2007.
Web. 10 Jan. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wupsPg5H6aE>.

"St Peter's - Chapel of the Pieta." St. Peter's Basilica. St.
Peter's Basilica, n.d. Web. 10 Jan. 2013. <http://saintpetersbasilica.org/Altars/Pieta/Pieta.htm>. "Courage, my comrades, war is near!"
I hear afar its hateful drums;
Its horrid din assails my ear:
I hope I die before it comes. . .
Yet as into the town I go,
And listen to the rabble cheer,
I think with heart of weary woe:
War is not coming - WAR IS HERE." "Portent"
By Robert William Service
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