Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Social Construction of Race and Gender

No description
by

Mary Kate Gavigan

on 11 March 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Social Construction of Race and Gender

Social Construction of Race and Gender
By: Mary Kate Gavigan Key Terms
Regarding Gender:
Sex: both sex differences – male/female – which are assumed to flow from anatomy, and a physical drive.
Gender: socially constructed roles, behaviors, activities, and attributes that a given society considers appropriate for men and women. Case Study:
Transsexual Man-to-woman





Gender is socially constructed, sexuality is not. Gender is not a result of natural, physical, or biological differences. Sexuality is defined as to whom one is attracted and his or her sexual character. Gender versus Sexuality Race versus Ethnicity Experiment: Do Children See Race? Social construct: a social mechanism,
phenomenon, or category created and
developed by society; a perception of
an individual, group, or idea that is
'constructed' through cultural or social
practice.
*Opposite of biologically formed What is a social construct? Key Terms Regarding Race: Races: groups of people who have differences and similarities in biological traits deemed by society to be socially significant, meaning that people treat other people differently because of them.
Ethnicity: shared cultural practices, perspectives, and distinctions that set apart one group of people from another; shared cultural heritage.
Racism: hatred or intolerance of another race or other races.
Whiteness: the privilege to assume that whiteness is the norm against which everyone else should be compared and 2) the privilege to live one's life without ever needing to be aware of one's whiteness and how it might be impacting their life. Some Final Thoughts: Gender Some Final Thoughts: Race Race is the biological similarities and differences between people and ethnicity is the shared cultural practices within a group. Different races can share ethnicity. Key Terms
Regarding Race: Race: groups of people who have differences and similarities in biological traits deemed by society to be socially significant.
Racism: prejudice based on socially significant physical features.
Ethnicity: shared cultural practices, perspectives, and distinctions that set apart one group of people from another. About 60 years ago, Kenneth and Mamie Clark studied a group of African-American children ages three to seven. They showed each of them two dolls: identical except in their skin color.

The study was repeated in 2006 by a high school girl and also by a junior college English class more than half of a century later-- the results were very similar. Video: Do Children See Race? -Children DO see race.
-They tend to play/interact with those who look familiar to them.
-They do not have negative connotations assigned to certain races, those beliefs are learned and experienced. Questions: Have certain gender roles changed through the process of globalization? Why? How? Do you think globalization is causing racism to increase or decrease? Gender Identity Versus Gender Roles Gender identity is how one assimilates with his/her sex.
gender roles are socially constructed views on how a sex should behave. Gender identity is biological, gender roles are not.
Gender is socially constructed: the more we are treated in a certain way the more we succumb to that way of acting. Children Notice Race Infants tend to linger longer at faces that are not familiar to them. So, difference is physically notable from birth, but negative connotations are learned by a young age. James Morris was born a male, and describes his (now her) changed life as a woman.
-Women treated her equally.
-She was seen as inferior to men.
-The more she was treated like a woman, the more of a woman she became.
Full transcript